Interlochen Center for the Arts

Interlochen Center for the Arts

Interlochen College of Creative Arts - 2015

Activity Start Date End Date Status  
Adult Band Camp Dinner - Assistant (8/5, 5:30pm)

Assist in organizing participant polo shirts and distributing them.

Time: 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.

Venue: Mallory-Towsley

Venue Note: The Mallory-Towsley Center for Arts Leadership is the home of Interlochen College of Creative Arts. The Mallory-Towsley building is located to the left of the Phoenix Theatre. Please park in parking lot U that is located directly across the street.

8/5/2015 8/5/2015 3Scheduled  2No shifts available  
Adult Band Camp Faculty Recital - Greeter (8/6, 6:30pm)

Time: 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Venue: Dendrinos Chapel

 

8/6/2015 8/6/2015 3Scheduled  2No shifts available  
Adult Band Camp Participant Recital - Greeter (8/9, 6:30pm)

Time: 6:30 - 9:30 p.m.

Venue: Dendrinos Chapel

 

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/17, 11:15am)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/17/2015 8/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/17, 4:30pm)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 4:30 - 6:15 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/17/2015 8/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/18, 11:15am)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/18/2015 8/18/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/18, 4:30pm)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 4:30 - 7:00 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/18/2015 8/18/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/19, 11:15am)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/19, 4:30pm)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 4:30 - 6:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/20, 11:15am)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/20/2015 8/20/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/20, 4:30pm)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 4:30 - 6:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/20/2015 8/20/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/21, 11:15am)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/21/2015 8/21/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/21, 4pm)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 4:00 - 8:15 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/21/2015 8/21/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/22, 11:15am)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/22/2015 8/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chamber Music Camp - Instrument Check-In (8/22, 5:15pm)

Receive, tag and watch over instruments for participants to attend activity. Provide instruments back when requested.

Time: 5:15 - 6:45 p.m.

Location: Stone Hotel Basement

8/22/2015 8/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Chapman Stick Faculty Concert - Usher (7/16, 7pm)

Time: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Venue: Mallory-Towsley

Venue Note: The Mallory-Towsley Center for Arts Leadership is the home of Interlochen College of Creative Arts. The Mallory-Towsley building is located to the left of the Phoenix Theatre. Please park in parking lot U that is located directly across the street.

7/16/2015 7/16/2015 3Scheduled  2No shifts available  
Chapman Stick Student Recital - Usher (7/18, 6:30pm)

Time: 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Venue: Mallory-Towsley

Venue Note: The Mallory-Towsley Center for Arts Leadership is the home of Interlochen College of Creative Arts. The Mallory-Towsley building is located to the left of the Phoenix Theatre. Please park in parking lot U that is located directly across the street.

7/18/2015 7/18/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Enso String Quartet Reception - Host (8/17, 8pm)

 Time: 8:00 - 10:00 p.m.

 Venue: Corson Auditorium

Please wear your summer uniform, including volunteer ID badge.

 

 

8/17/2015 8/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Enso String Quartet Reception - Host (8/22, 8:30pm)

 Time: 8:30 - 10:00 p.m.

 Venue: Corson Auditorium

Please wear your summer uniform, including volunteer ID badge.

 

 

8/22/2015 8/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Fingerstyle Guitar Faculty Concert - Usher (7/29, 7pm)

Time: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Venue: Mallory-Towsley Great Room

Venue Note: The Mallory-Towsley Center for Arts Leadership is the home of Interlochen College of Creative Arts. The Mallory-Towsley building is located to the left of the Phoenix Theatre. Please park in parking lot U that is located directly across the street.

Please wear your summer uniform, including volunteer ID badge.

7/29/2015 7/29/2015 3Scheduled  2No shifts available  
Fingerstyle Guitar Faculty Concert - Usher (7/31, 7pm)

Time: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Venue: Mallory-Towsley Great Room

Venue Note: The Mallory-Towsley Center for Arts Leadership is the home of Interlochen College of Creative Arts. The Mallory-Towsley building is located to the left of the Phoenix Theatre. Please park in parking lot U that is located directly across the street.

Please wear your summer uniform, including volunteer ID badge.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  2No shifts available  
Fingerstyle Guitar Faculty Concert - Usher (8/1, 2:30pm)

Time: 2:30 - 5:00 p.m.

Venue: Mallory-Towsley Great Room

Venue Note: The Mallory-Towsley Center for Arts Leadership is the home of Interlochen College of Creative Arts. The Mallory-Towsley building is located to the left of the Phoenix Theatre. Please park in parking lot U that is located directly across the street.

Please wear your summer uniform, including volunteer ID badge.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  2No shifts available  

Summer Concerts: *JULY 2015

Activity Start Date End Date Status  
"The Tender Land" (7/31 - 8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

"The Tender Land”
Music: Aaron Copland
Libretto: Horace Everett
Conductor, James Bagwell

"The Tender Land" was composed in 1953 on a commission from Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II and received its premiere on April 1, 1954 at the City Center in New York. Concerning a girl transformed into a young woman by her first experience of love, "The Tender Land" is set in the American Midwest during the 1930s.

The libretto by Horace Everett (a pseudonym of Erik Johns) was inspired by photographs taken by Walker Evans of a rural, Depression-era mother and her daughter that had appeared in James Agee's book "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men."

The music is cut from the same cloth as that of "Appalachian Spring"—the melodic, easygoing, folkish vein that Copland could manage about as easily as breathing. Lightly scored (calling for winds and brass in twos) and with spoken dialogue in the style of the musical stage, the score has come to be regarded as one of Copland's finest, as he himself believed it to be.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
A Prairie Home Companion (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION 
Enjoy this popular variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor, now on its 41st anniversary tour.

About the Show
The America the Beautiful Tour 2015 will feature 2½ hours of Sweet Harmony & Garrison Keillor with Piano Master Richard Dworsky and Fred Newman World's Greatest SFX Man & The Radio Rhubarb Band with Fiddling Richard Kriehn & Chris Siebold Boy Guitarist, Guy Noir, Private Eye & News from Lake Wobegon & Audience Chorale & Poetry Declamation & Other Classics from 41 Years of Radio History.

If you showed up on July 6, 1974, at the Janet Wallace Auditorium at Macalester College in Saint Paul and plunked down your $1 admission (50 cents for kids) to attend the very first broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion, you were in select company. There were about 12 people in the audience. But those in attendance thought there were worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon, so Garrison Keillor and the APHC team went on to produce close to 500 live shows in the first 10 years alone. There were broadcasts from this venue and that, until March 4, 1978, when the show moved to The World Theater, a lovely, crumbling building that was one plaster crack away from the wrecking ball. (Now fully renovated and renamed The Fitzgerald, it is the show's home base.)

In June of 1987, APHC ended for a while. Garrison thought it was a good idea at the time, but only two years later, the show was back, based in New York and called American Radio Company of the Air. But there's no place like home. So in 1992, it was back to Minnesota and, soon after, back to the old name: A Prairie Home Companion.

There has been plenty of adventure in the past 30-plus years — broadcasts from Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Germany, Iceland and almost every one of the 50 states; wonderful performers, little-known and world-renowned; standing ovations and stares of bewilderment. We've missed planes, coped with lost luggage, dodged swooping bats and hungry mosquitoes, plodded through blizzards, and flown by the seat of our pants.

Today, A Prairie Home Companion is heard by four million listeners each week on more than 600 public radio stations, and abroad on America One and the Armed Forces Networks in Europe and the Far East. Garrison recalls, "When the show started, it was something funny to do with my friends, and then it became an achievement that I hoped would be successful, and now it's a good way of life."

A Prairie Home Companion is produced by Prairie Home Productions, and distributed nationwide by American Public Media. The program is underwritten by Ford and Holiday Vacations.

Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, graduated from the University of Minnesota ('66), and lives in St. Paul. He is the author of numerous books, including Pilgrims: A Wobegon Romance; O, What A Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound (Grove Press); and The Keillor Reader (Viking). He is also the editor of the Good Poems anthologies.

Fred Newman
Sound effects man Fred Newman is an actor, writer, musician, and sound designer for film and TV. Turns out, no one is more surprised than Fred that he's made a career out of doing what he used to do behind the teacher's back — crossing his eyes, making sounds, and doing voices. He readily admits that, growing up, he was unceremoniously removed from several classrooms, "once by my bottom lip."

Richard Dworsky
Keyboardist, composer, and arranger Richard Dworsky is APHC's music director. He leads the band, composes themes, improvises script underscores, and collaborates with such diverse guests as Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, Brad Paisley, Kristin Chenoweth, and Sheryl Crow. He has released many recordings of original material and has provided music for documentaries on HBO and PBS.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
A Prairie Home Companion (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION 
Enjoy this popular variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor, now on its 41st anniversary tour.

About the Show
The America the Beautiful Tour 2015 will feature 2½ hours of Sweet Harmony & Garrison Keillor with Piano Master Richard Dworsky and Fred Newman World's Greatest SFX Man & The Radio Rhubarb Band with Fiddling Richard Kriehn & Chris Siebold Boy Guitarist, Guy Noir, Private Eye & News from Lake Wobegon & Audience Chorale & Poetry Declamation & Other Classics from 41 Years of Radio History.

If you showed up on July 6, 1974, at the Janet Wallace Auditorium at Macalester College in Saint Paul and plunked down your $1 admission (50 cents for kids) to attend the very first broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion, you were in select company. There were about 12 people in the audience. But those in attendance thought there were worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon, so Garrison Keillor and the APHC team went on to produce close to 500 live shows in the first 10 years alone. There were broadcasts from this venue and that, until March 4, 1978, when the show moved to The World Theater, a lovely, crumbling building that was one plaster crack away from the wrecking ball. (Now fully renovated and renamed The Fitzgerald, it is the show's home base.)

In June of 1987, APHC ended for a while. Garrison thought it was a good idea at the time, but only two years later, the show was back, based in New York and called American Radio Company of the Air. But there's no place like home. So in 1992, it was back to Minnesota and, soon after, back to the old name: A Prairie Home Companion.

There has been plenty of adventure in the past 30-plus years — broadcasts from Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Germany, Iceland and almost every one of the 50 states; wonderful performers, little-known and world-renowned; standing ovations and stares of bewilderment. We've missed planes, coped with lost luggage, dodged swooping bats and hungry mosquitoes, plodded through blizzards, and flown by the seat of our pants.

Today, A Prairie Home Companion is heard by four million listeners each week on more than 600 public radio stations, and abroad on America One and the Armed Forces Networks in Europe and the Far East. Garrison recalls, "When the show started, it was something funny to do with my friends, and then it became an achievement that I hoped would be successful, and now it's a good way of life."

A Prairie Home Companion is produced by Prairie Home Productions, and distributed nationwide by American Public Media. The program is underwritten by Ford and Holiday Vacations.

Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, graduated from the University of Minnesota ('66), and lives in St. Paul. He is the author of numerous books, including Pilgrims: A Wobegon Romance; O, What A Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound (Grove Press); and The Keillor Reader (Viking). He is also the editor of the Good Poems anthologies.

Fred Newman
Sound effects man Fred Newman is an actor, writer, musician, and sound designer for film and TV. Turns out, no one is more surprised than Fred that he's made a career out of doing what he used to do behind the teacher's back — crossing his eyes, making sounds, and doing voices. He readily admits that, growing up, he was unceremoniously removed from several classrooms, "once by my bottom lip."

Richard Dworsky
Keyboardist, composer, and arranger Richard Dworsky is APHC's music director. He leads the band, composes themes, improvises script underscores, and collaborates with such diverse guests as Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, Brad Paisley, Kristin Chenoweth, and Sheryl Crow. He has released many recordings of original material and has provided music for documentaries on HBO and PBS.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
A Prairie Home Companion (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION 
Enjoy this popular variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor, now on its 41st anniversary tour.

About the Show
The America the Beautiful Tour 2015 will feature 2½ hours of Sweet Harmony & Garrison Keillor with Piano Master Richard Dworsky and Fred Newman World's Greatest SFX Man & The Radio Rhubarb Band with Fiddling Richard Kriehn & Chris Siebold Boy Guitarist, Guy Noir, Private Eye & News from Lake Wobegon & Audience Chorale & Poetry Declamation & Other Classics from 41 Years of Radio History.

If you showed up on July 6, 1974, at the Janet Wallace Auditorium at Macalester College in Saint Paul and plunked down your $1 admission (50 cents for kids) to attend the very first broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion, you were in select company. There were about 12 people in the audience. But those in attendance thought there were worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon, so Garrison Keillor and the APHC team went on to produce close to 500 live shows in the first 10 years alone. There were broadcasts from this venue and that, until March 4, 1978, when the show moved to The World Theater, a lovely, crumbling building that was one plaster crack away from the wrecking ball. (Now fully renovated and renamed The Fitzgerald, it is the show's home base.)

In June of 1987, APHC ended for a while. Garrison thought it was a good idea at the time, but only two years later, the show was back, based in New York and called American Radio Company of the Air. But there's no place like home. So in 1992, it was back to Minnesota and, soon after, back to the old name: A Prairie Home Companion.

There has been plenty of adventure in the past 30-plus years — broadcasts from Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Germany, Iceland and almost every one of the 50 states; wonderful performers, little-known and world-renowned; standing ovations and stares of bewilderment. We've missed planes, coped with lost luggage, dodged swooping bats and hungry mosquitoes, plodded through blizzards, and flown by the seat of our pants.

Today, A Prairie Home Companion is heard by four million listeners each week on more than 600 public radio stations, and abroad on America One and the Armed Forces Networks in Europe and the Far East. Garrison recalls, "When the show started, it was something funny to do with my friends, and then it became an achievement that I hoped would be successful, and now it's a good way of life."

A Prairie Home Companion is produced by Prairie Home Productions, and distributed nationwide by American Public Media. The program is underwritten by Ford and Holiday Vacations.

Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, graduated from the University of Minnesota ('66), and lives in St. Paul. He is the author of numerous books, including Pilgrims: A Wobegon Romance; O, What A Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound (Grove Press); and The Keillor Reader (Viking). He is also the editor of the Good Poems anthologies.

Fred Newman
Sound effects man Fred Newman is an actor, writer, musician, and sound designer for film and TV. Turns out, no one is more surprised than Fred that he's made a career out of doing what he used to do behind the teacher's back — crossing his eyes, making sounds, and doing voices. He readily admits that, growing up, he was unceremoniously removed from several classrooms, "once by my bottom lip."

Richard Dworsky
Keyboardist, composer, and arranger Richard Dworsky is APHC's music director. He leads the band, composes themes, improvises script underscores, and collaborates with such diverse guests as Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, Brad Paisley, Kristin Chenoweth, and Sheryl Crow. He has released many recordings of original material and has provided music for documentaries on HBO and PBS.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
A Prairie Home Companion (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION 
Enjoy this popular variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor, now on its 41st anniversary tour.

About the Show
The America the Beautiful Tour 2015 will feature 2½ hours of Sweet Harmony & Garrison Keillor with Piano Master Richard Dworsky and Fred Newman World's Greatest SFX Man & The Radio Rhubarb Band with Fiddling Richard Kriehn & Chris Siebold Boy Guitarist, Guy Noir, Private Eye & News from Lake Wobegon & Audience Chorale & Poetry Declamation & Other Classics from 41 Years of Radio History.

If you showed up on July 6, 1974, at the Janet Wallace Auditorium at Macalester College in Saint Paul and plunked down your $1 admission (50 cents for kids) to attend the very first broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion, you were in select company. There were about 12 people in the audience. But those in attendance thought there were worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon, so Garrison Keillor and the APHC team went on to produce close to 500 live shows in the first 10 years alone. There were broadcasts from this venue and that, until March 4, 1978, when the show moved to The World Theater, a lovely, crumbling building that was one plaster crack away from the wrecking ball. (Now fully renovated and renamed The Fitzgerald, it is the show's home base.)

In June of 1987, APHC ended for a while. Garrison thought it was a good idea at the time, but only two years later, the show was back, based in New York and called American Radio Company of the Air. But there's no place like home. So in 1992, it was back to Minnesota and, soon after, back to the old name: A Prairie Home Companion.

There has been plenty of adventure in the past 30-plus years — broadcasts from Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Germany, Iceland and almost every one of the 50 states; wonderful performers, little-known and world-renowned; standing ovations and stares of bewilderment. We've missed planes, coped with lost luggage, dodged swooping bats and hungry mosquitoes, plodded through blizzards, and flown by the seat of our pants.

Today, A Prairie Home Companion is heard by four million listeners each week on more than 600 public radio stations, and abroad on America One and the Armed Forces Networks in Europe and the Far East. Garrison recalls, "When the show started, it was something funny to do with my friends, and then it became an achievement that I hoped would be successful, and now it's a good way of life."

A Prairie Home Companion is produced by Prairie Home Productions, and distributed nationwide by American Public Media. The program is underwritten by Ford and Holiday Vacations.

Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, graduated from the University of Minnesota ('66), and lives in St. Paul. He is the author of numerous books, including Pilgrims: A Wobegon Romance; O, What A Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound (Grove Press); and The Keillor Reader (Viking). He is also the editor of the Good Poems anthologies.

Fred Newman
Sound effects man Fred Newman is an actor, writer, musician, and sound designer for film and TV. Turns out, no one is more surprised than Fred that he's made a career out of doing what he used to do behind the teacher's back — crossing his eyes, making sounds, and doing voices. He readily admits that, growing up, he was unceremoniously removed from several classrooms, "once by my bottom lip."

Richard Dworsky
Keyboardist, composer, and arranger Richard Dworsky is APHC's music director. He leads the band, composes themes, improvises script underscores, and collaborates with such diverse guests as Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, Brad Paisley, Kristin Chenoweth, and Sheryl Crow. He has released many recordings of original material and has provided music for documentaries on HBO and PBS.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
A Prairie Home Companion (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION 
Enjoy this popular variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor, now on its 41st anniversary tour.

About the Show
The America the Beautiful Tour 2015 will feature 2½ hours of Sweet Harmony & Garrison Keillor with Piano Master Richard Dworsky and Fred Newman World's Greatest SFX Man & The Radio Rhubarb Band with Fiddling Richard Kriehn & Chris Siebold Boy Guitarist, Guy Noir, Private Eye & News from Lake Wobegon & Audience Chorale & Poetry Declamation & Other Classics from 41 Years of Radio History.

If you showed up on July 6, 1974, at the Janet Wallace Auditorium at Macalester College in Saint Paul and plunked down your $1 admission (50 cents for kids) to attend the very first broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion, you were in select company. There were about 12 people in the audience. But those in attendance thought there were worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon, so Garrison Keillor and the APHC team went on to produce close to 500 live shows in the first 10 years alone. There were broadcasts from this venue and that, until March 4, 1978, when the show moved to The World Theater, a lovely, crumbling building that was one plaster crack away from the wrecking ball. (Now fully renovated and renamed The Fitzgerald, it is the show's home base.)

In June of 1987, APHC ended for a while. Garrison thought it was a good idea at the time, but only two years later, the show was back, based in New York and called American Radio Company of the Air. But there's no place like home. So in 1992, it was back to Minnesota and, soon after, back to the old name: A Prairie Home Companion.

There has been plenty of adventure in the past 30-plus years — broadcasts from Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Germany, Iceland and almost every one of the 50 states; wonderful performers, little-known and world-renowned; standing ovations and stares of bewilderment. We've missed planes, coped with lost luggage, dodged swooping bats and hungry mosquitoes, plodded through blizzards, and flown by the seat of our pants.

Today, A Prairie Home Companion is heard by four million listeners each week on more than 600 public radio stations, and abroad on America One and the Armed Forces Networks in Europe and the Far East. Garrison recalls, "When the show started, it was something funny to do with my friends, and then it became an achievement that I hoped would be successful, and now it's a good way of life."

A Prairie Home Companion is produced by Prairie Home Productions, and distributed nationwide by American Public Media. The program is underwritten by Ford and Holiday Vacations.

Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, graduated from the University of Minnesota ('66), and lives in St. Paul. He is the author of numerous books, including Pilgrims: A Wobegon Romance; O, What A Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound (Grove Press); and The Keillor Reader (Viking). He is also the editor of the Good Poems anthologies.

Fred Newman
Sound effects man Fred Newman is an actor, writer, musician, and sound designer for film and TV. Turns out, no one is more surprised than Fred that he's made a career out of doing what he used to do behind the teacher's back — crossing his eyes, making sounds, and doing voices. He readily admits that, growing up, he was unceremoniously removed from several classrooms, "once by my bottom lip."

Richard Dworsky
Keyboardist, composer, and arranger Richard Dworsky is APHC's music director. He leads the band, composes themes, improvises script underscores, and collaborates with such diverse guests as Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, Brad Paisley, Kristin Chenoweth, and Sheryl Crow. He has released many recordings of original material and has provided music for documentaries on HBO and PBS.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
A Prairie Home Companion (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION 
Enjoy this popular variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor, now on its 41st anniversary tour.

About the Show
The America the Beautiful Tour 2015 will feature 2½ hours of Sweet Harmony & Garrison Keillor with Piano Master Richard Dworsky and Fred Newman World's Greatest SFX Man & The Radio Rhubarb Band with Fiddling Richard Kriehn & Chris Siebold Boy Guitarist, Guy Noir, Private Eye & News from Lake Wobegon & Audience Chorale & Poetry Declamation & Other Classics from 41 Years of Radio History.

If you showed up on July 6, 1974, at the Janet Wallace Auditorium at Macalester College in Saint Paul and plunked down your $1 admission (50 cents for kids) to attend the very first broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion, you were in select company. There were about 12 people in the audience. But those in attendance thought there were worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon, so Garrison Keillor and the APHC team went on to produce close to 500 live shows in the first 10 years alone. There were broadcasts from this venue and that, until March 4, 1978, when the show moved to The World Theater, a lovely, crumbling building that was one plaster crack away from the wrecking ball. (Now fully renovated and renamed The Fitzgerald, it is the show's home base.)

In June of 1987, APHC ended for a while. Garrison thought it was a good idea at the time, but only two years later, the show was back, based in New York and called American Radio Company of the Air. But there's no place like home. So in 1992, it was back to Minnesota and, soon after, back to the old name: A Prairie Home Companion.

There has been plenty of adventure in the past 30-plus years — broadcasts from Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Germany, Iceland and almost every one of the 50 states; wonderful performers, little-known and world-renowned; standing ovations and stares of bewilderment. We've missed planes, coped with lost luggage, dodged swooping bats and hungry mosquitoes, plodded through blizzards, and flown by the seat of our pants.

Today, A Prairie Home Companion is heard by four million listeners each week on more than 600 public radio stations, and abroad on America One and the Armed Forces Networks in Europe and the Far East. Garrison recalls, "When the show started, it was something funny to do with my friends, and then it became an achievement that I hoped would be successful, and now it's a good way of life."

A Prairie Home Companion is produced by Prairie Home Productions, and distributed nationwide by American Public Media. The program is underwritten by Ford and Holiday Vacations.

Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, graduated from the University of Minnesota ('66), and lives in St. Paul. He is the author of numerous books, including Pilgrims: A Wobegon Romance; O, What A Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound (Grove Press); and The Keillor Reader (Viking). He is also the editor of the Good Poems anthologies.

Fred Newman
Sound effects man Fred Newman is an actor, writer, musician, and sound designer for film and TV. Turns out, no one is more surprised than Fred that he's made a career out of doing what he used to do behind the teacher's back — crossing his eyes, making sounds, and doing voices. He readily admits that, growing up, he was unceremoniously removed from several classrooms, "once by my bottom lip."

Richard Dworsky
Keyboardist, composer, and arranger Richard Dworsky is APHC's music director. He leads the band, composes themes, improvises script underscores, and collaborates with such diverse guests as Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, Brad Paisley, Kristin Chenoweth, and Sheryl Crow. He has released many recordings of original material and has provided music for documentaries on HBO and PBS.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Aaron Copland film screening "Our Town" (8pm, DeRoy)

Location: DeRoy

Please arrive at DeRoy no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Aaron Copland composed a number of film scores which exemplify his unique style and experimental characteristics to varying degrees — offering listeners a diverse range of 20th century music for film.

"Our Town"
"Our Town" is a 1940 film adaptation of a play of the same name by Thornton Wilder starring William Holden, Martha Scott, Fay Bainter, Beulah Bondi, Thomas Mitchell, Guy Kibbee and Frank Craven. It was adapted by Harry Chandlee, Craven and Wilder. It was directed by Sam Wood. The movie was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Scott, who repeated her stage role as Emily Webb, was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress, and Aaron Copland was nominated for Best Score.

7/16/2015 7/16/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Aaron Copland film screening "The Heiress" (8pm, DeRoy)

Location: DeRoy

Please arrive at DeRoy no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Aaron Copland composed a number of film scores which exemplify his unique style and experimental characteristics to varying degrees — offering listeners a diverse range of 20th century music for film.

"The Heiress"
Aaron Copland wrote the score for "The Heiress," a 1949 American drama film directed by William Wyler and starring Olivia de Havilland as Catherine Sloper, Montgomery Clift as Morris Townsend, and Ralph Richardson as Dr. Sloper. Written by Ruth and Augustus Goetz, adapted from their 1947 play "The Heiress." The play was suggested by the 1880 novel "Washington Square" by Henry James. The film is about a young naive woman who falls in love with a handsome young man, despite the objections of her emotionally abusive father who suspects the man of being a fortune hunter.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Aaron Copland film screening "The Red Pony" (8pm, DeRoy)

Location: DeRoy

Please arrive at DeRoy no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Aaron Copland composed a number of film scores which exemplify his unique style and experimental characteristics to varying degrees — offering listeners a diverse range of 20th century music for film.

"The Red Pony"
Aaron Copland composed the score for "The Red Pony," a 1949 Western drama film based on one of John Steinbeck's short stories published in the 1930s under the title "The Red Pony." Steinbeck also wrote the screenplay for this film.

7/20/2015 7/20/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Boz Scaggs (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

BOZ SCAGGS with special guest TOWER OF POWER
Grammy-Award winning rock legend Boz Scaggs joins "Urban Soul Music" Tower of Power for this unforgettable night of hits.

Boz Scaggs
Singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, best known as a member of the Steve Miller Band, was born William Royce Scaggs in Canton, Ohio in 1944. As a child, he lived first in Oklahoma and then Texas, where he picked up his nickname Boz. He encountered Steve Miller when he was still in school, and having already learned the guitar, Scaggs paired up with Miller as a musical duo.

Later, as a young man, Boz Scaggs left for London and spent some time performing with such bands as Mother Earth and the Wigs, before recording his solo debut, Boz, in 1965. He returned to the United States, heading for San Francisco, and joined up with Steve Miller again in 1987. Scaggs joined Miller for the albums Children of the Future and Sailor, but shortly thereafter Boz signed a record deal as a solo artist, and his second album, Boz Scaggs, was released in 1969.

The 1970s brought Boz Scaggs his greatest success as a solo artist. Moments, released in 1971, was followed by My Time in 1972 and Slow Dancer in 1974, but it was Silk Degrees in 1976 that reached the top of the charts and gave audiences the hit singles "Lowdown" and "Lido Shuffle." Down Two Then Left (1977) and Middle Man (1980) were equally successful, spawning the singles "Jo Jo" and "Breakdown Dead Ahead."

Boz Scaggs took a hiatus for most of the 1980s, but returned in 1988 with Other Roads. Some Change followed in 1994, and Come on Home and My Time: The Anthology after that in 1997. In 2003, Boz Scaggs explored his love of jazz with his album But Beautiful.
When not growing grapes and producing wine with his family in California's Napa Valley, Boz Scaggs hits the stage for regular tours, nearly every summer. Scaggs maintains a steady fan base that continues to support his live performances, and in 2010, he enjoyed a highly successful tour as a member of The Dukes of September Rhythm Review, with Michael McDonald and Donald Fagen.

Tower of Power
For well close to five decades, Tower of Power has delivered the best in Rhythm and Blues music. But, as group co-founder Emilio Castillo says, they could have had a much different name.

"We were a Soul band called The Motowns." he recalls. Rocco Prestia was the bass player, I was in there, and my brother was the drummer. I met Doc Kupka at the Alameda County Fair over the Fourth of July weekend back in 1968, and gave him an audition. He came in the band, and we eventually changed our name to the Tower of Power." The reason for the band name change was that they had a specific goal in mind.

"We wanted to get into the Fillmore Auditorium and with a name like the Motowns, dressed in suits with razor cuts, we knew we'd never get in there. We grew our hair long, and started to be hippies, and changed our name. Doc then suggested to me that we should start writing our own songs. Our first song was 'You're Still A Young Man."

The gig at the Fillmore was a major goal for the band, which incidentally came along at just the right time. "At the time, we had been playing nightclubs, and we had gotten busted for being underage. We had been playing underage in nightclubs for years. That's all we knew. One night, the ABC came in, and caught the trumpet player drinking a screwdriver, and the next thing we knew, they put a notice out to all the clubs in the Bay Area that if they hired us again, they would lose their liquor license. We found ourselves with no work and no money. My parents had moved to Detroit and I was on my own for the first time. I was broke and hungry, and all I did was rehearse. We wrote the songs for the East Bay Grease record, and we practiced them every day. By the time November came around, we were at the end of our rope. I told the guys that I was going to Detroit for the holidays to see my parents, and if nothing happened with this audition, I wasn't coming back."

Fortunately, he did have to make a return trip to the Bay Area. "A couple of days later, Doc called me, and said 'You've gotta come back. He dug it." I said 'Who dug it?" He said 'Bill Graham.' As it turned out, Bill and David Rubinson – the producer for his new label, San Francisco Records - liked the band because we were soulful. Everyone had grown out of the whole psychedelic thing. Bands like Jefferson Airplane and Grateful Dead had been happening for about three years. The collective ear of the Bay Area was ready for something soulful. That's right when we came along."

Their first record, East Bay Grease, helped to define the East Bay sound, and did well enough to warrant a recording contract with Warner Brothers. Bump City, their 1972 debut for the label, was a hit on both the Billboard 200 and the chart's R&B Albums chart, and netted them the hits "You're Still A Young Man" and "Down To The Nightclub." The decade of the 1970s were a boom period for the group, who hit with radio classics like "So Very Hard To Go" and "What Is Hip?" and the band has continued to tour and record over the years with their latest project Hipper Than Hip being a live flash back to their 1974 tour. Castillo says their love of the stage is the same today as it was back in 1968.

"I still love it as much as ever. We're not a smooth jazz band, or a retro band...we don't follow trends, we just make our music exactly the way we want it to be. We noticed years ago that when we did that, the fans liked it. We stay true to that, and that makes it easy to go to work on a daily basis. Every time we go to play, we're playing music we love because we got to make it our way" The thrill of stepping on stage has never gone away, because as Castillo says, he loves the attention. "Let's face it. Musicians are some of the most self-centered people in the world. So, that never gets old. People ask what it feels like to hear your song on the radio. It never gets old. What's it like to see yourself on TV? Again, it never gets old."

In 2014, Tower of Power will be on the road – a lot – as a result of their tour with Journey and the Steve Miller Band. He credits their involvement to an old friend, Journey guitarist Neal Schon. "We've known him for years, back to when he was hired to play in Carlos Santana's band as an extra guitarist. When we were new, Carlos really dug the band, and he used to take us on tour – even when people around the nation didn't know us. Some of those nights, we were playing at a high level, and gave him a good run for his money. He liked that. He liked being challenged. It made him play better. At the time, Neil was in the band, and we've known him ever since then. About a year or two ago, he noticed our presence was becoming a little more known on the Internet and TV. He came to a few gigs, and the next thing we know, we get this offer to tour," he says with a smile.

Fans that come out to see Tower of Power this year will get a look at their brand new lead singer, Ray Greene. Castillo says he's a perfect fit. "It's phenomenal. Most bands lose their singer, and it's over. But, we've changed singers and other players so many times, the fans actually get excited about who's next." he said, as the band has had over forty members throughout their history. "I worked on finding a new singer for about a year, and prayed about it a lot. I found out about Ray, and he's amazing. All the guys come on stage, and we just think 'Wow. God has really blessed us.' He's doing a great job, and has a great personality. One of the things you learn when you've been in the business as long as I have is to hire good people with principles because you're going to spend as much as twenty hours a day with these guys. Ray's got everything – he looks great, he sings great, he's a good person. We're just really blessed to have him."

With a new member comes a new attitude, and Emilio says it's contagious. "Everybody in the band is saying 'Wow, what is happening?' You get to an age where we're at and things can start to run down but it seems like for us that things are really kicking into high gear."

And, that's the way Tower of Power likes it!

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Boz Scaggs (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

BOZ SCAGGS with special guest TOWER OF POWER
Grammy-Award winning rock legend Boz Scaggs joins "Urban Soul Music" Tower of Power for this unforgettable night of hits.

Boz Scaggs
Singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, best known as a member of the Steve Miller Band, was born William Royce Scaggs in Canton, Ohio in 1944. As a child, he lived first in Oklahoma and then Texas, where he picked up his nickname Boz. He encountered Steve Miller when he was still in school, and having already learned the guitar, Scaggs paired up with Miller as a musical duo.

Later, as a young man, Boz Scaggs left for London and spent some time performing with such bands as Mother Earth and the Wigs, before recording his solo debut, Boz, in 1965. He returned to the United States, heading for San Francisco, and joined up with Steve Miller again in 1987. Scaggs joined Miller for the albums Children of the Future and Sailor, but shortly thereafter Boz signed a record deal as a solo artist, and his second album, Boz Scaggs, was released in 1969.

The 1970s brought Boz Scaggs his greatest success as a solo artist. Moments, released in 1971, was followed by My Time in 1972 and Slow Dancer in 1974, but it was Silk Degrees in 1976 that reached the top of the charts and gave audiences the hit singles "Lowdown" and "Lido Shuffle." Down Two Then Left (1977) and Middle Man (1980) were equally successful, spawning the singles "Jo Jo" and "Breakdown Dead Ahead."

Boz Scaggs took a hiatus for most of the 1980s, but returned in 1988 with Other Roads. Some Change followed in 1994, and Come on Home and My Time: The Anthology after that in 1997. In 2003, Boz Scaggs explored his love of jazz with his album But Beautiful.
When not growing grapes and producing wine with his family in California's Napa Valley, Boz Scaggs hits the stage for regular tours, nearly every summer. Scaggs maintains a steady fan base that continues to support his live performances, and in 2010, he enjoyed a highly successful tour as a member of The Dukes of September Rhythm Review, with Michael McDonald and Donald Fagen.

Tower of Power
For well close to five decades, Tower of Power has delivered the best in Rhythm and Blues music. But, as group co-founder Emilio Castillo says, they could have had a much different name.

"We were a Soul band called The Motowns." he recalls. Rocco Prestia was the bass player, I was in there, and my brother was the drummer. I met Doc Kupka at the Alameda County Fair over the Fourth of July weekend back in 1968, and gave him an audition. He came in the band, and we eventually changed our name to the Tower of Power." The reason for the band name change was that they had a specific goal in mind.

"We wanted to get into the Fillmore Auditorium and with a name like the Motowns, dressed in suits with razor cuts, we knew we'd never get in there. We grew our hair long, and started to be hippies, and changed our name. Doc then suggested to me that we should start writing our own songs. Our first song was 'You're Still A Young Man."

The gig at the Fillmore was a major goal for the band, which incidentally came along at just the right time. "At the time, we had been playing nightclubs, and we had gotten busted for being underage. We had been playing underage in nightclubs for years. That's all we knew. One night, the ABC came in, and caught the trumpet player drinking a screwdriver, and the next thing we knew, they put a notice out to all the clubs in the Bay Area that if they hired us again, they would lose their liquor license. We found ourselves with no work and no money. My parents had moved to Detroit and I was on my own for the first time. I was broke and hungry, and all I did was rehearse. We wrote the songs for the East Bay Grease record, and we practiced them every day. By the time November came around, we were at the end of our rope. I told the guys that I was going to Detroit for the holidays to see my parents, and if nothing happened with this audition, I wasn't coming back."

Fortunately, he did have to make a return trip to the Bay Area. "A couple of days later, Doc called me, and said 'You've gotta come back. He dug it." I said 'Who dug it?" He said 'Bill Graham.' As it turned out, Bill and David Rubinson – the producer for his new label, San Francisco Records - liked the band because we were soulful. Everyone had grown out of the whole psychedelic thing. Bands like Jefferson Airplane and Grateful Dead had been happening for about three years. The collective ear of the Bay Area was ready for something soulful. That's right when we came along."

Their first record, East Bay Grease, helped to define the East Bay sound, and did well enough to warrant a recording contract with Warner Brothers. Bump City, their 1972 debut for the label, was a hit on both the Billboard 200 and the chart's R&B Albums chart, and netted them the hits "You're Still A Young Man" and "Down To The Nightclub." The decade of the 1970s were a boom period for the group, who hit with radio classics like "So Very Hard To Go" and "What Is Hip?" and the band has continued to tour and record over the years with their latest project Hipper Than Hip being a live flash back to their 1974 tour. Castillo says their love of the stage is the same today as it was back in 1968.

"I still love it as much as ever. We're not a smooth jazz band, or a retro band...we don't follow trends, we just make our music exactly the way we want it to be. We noticed years ago that when we did that, the fans liked it. We stay true to that, and that makes it easy to go to work on a daily basis. Every time we go to play, we're playing music we love because we got to make it our way" The thrill of stepping on stage has never gone away, because as Castillo says, he loves the attention. "Let's face it. Musicians are some of the most self-centered people in the world. So, that never gets old. People ask what it feels like to hear your song on the radio. It never gets old. What's it like to see yourself on TV? Again, it never gets old."

In 2014, Tower of Power will be on the road – a lot – as a result of their tour with Journey and the Steve Miller Band. He credits their involvement to an old friend, Journey guitarist Neal Schon. "We've known him for years, back to when he was hired to play in Carlos Santana's band as an extra guitarist. When we were new, Carlos really dug the band, and he used to take us on tour – even when people around the nation didn't know us. Some of those nights, we were playing at a high level, and gave him a good run for his money. He liked that. He liked being challenged. It made him play better. At the time, Neil was in the band, and we've known him ever since then. About a year or two ago, he noticed our presence was becoming a little more known on the Internet and TV. He came to a few gigs, and the next thing we know, we get this offer to tour," he says with a smile.

Fans that come out to see Tower of Power this year will get a look at their brand new lead singer, Ray Greene. Castillo says he's a perfect fit. "It's phenomenal. Most bands lose their singer, and it's over. But, we've changed singers and other players so many times, the fans actually get excited about who's next." he said, as the band has had over forty members throughout their history. "I worked on finding a new singer for about a year, and prayed about it a lot. I found out about Ray, and he's amazing. All the guys come on stage, and we just think 'Wow. God has really blessed us.' He's doing a great job, and has a great personality. One of the things you learn when you've been in the business as long as I have is to hire good people with principles because you're going to spend as much as twenty hours a day with these guys. Ray's got everything – he looks great, he sings great, he's a good person. We're just really blessed to have him."

With a new member comes a new attitude, and Emilio says it's contagious. "Everybody in the band is saying 'Wow, what is happening?' You get to an age where we're at and things can start to run down but it seems like for us that things are really kicking into high gear."

And, that's the way Tower of Power likes it!

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Boz Scaggs (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

BOZ SCAGGS with special guest TOWER OF POWER
Grammy-Award winning rock legend Boz Scaggs joins "Urban Soul Music" Tower of Power for this unforgettable night of hits.

Boz Scaggs
Singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, best known as a member of the Steve Miller Band, was born William Royce Scaggs in Canton, Ohio in 1944. As a child, he lived first in Oklahoma and then Texas, where he picked up his nickname Boz. He encountered Steve Miller when he was still in school, and having already learned the guitar, Scaggs paired up with Miller as a musical duo.

Later, as a young man, Boz Scaggs left for London and spent some time performing with such bands as Mother Earth and the Wigs, before recording his solo debut, Boz, in 1965. He returned to the United States, heading for San Francisco, and joined up with Steve Miller again in 1987. Scaggs joined Miller for the albums Children of the Future and Sailor, but shortly thereafter Boz signed a record deal as a solo artist, and his second album, Boz Scaggs, was released in 1969.

The 1970s brought Boz Scaggs his greatest success as a solo artist. Moments, released in 1971, was followed by My Time in 1972 and Slow Dancer in 1974, but it was Silk Degrees in 1976 that reached the top of the charts and gave audiences the hit singles "Lowdown" and "Lido Shuffle." Down Two Then Left (1977) and Middle Man (1980) were equally successful, spawning the singles "Jo Jo" and "Breakdown Dead Ahead."

Boz Scaggs took a hiatus for most of the 1980s, but returned in 1988 with Other Roads. Some Change followed in 1994, and Come on Home and My Time: The Anthology after that in 1997. In 2003, Boz Scaggs explored his love of jazz with his album But Beautiful.
When not growing grapes and producing wine with his family in California's Napa Valley, Boz Scaggs hits the stage for regular tours, nearly every summer. Scaggs maintains a steady fan base that continues to support his live performances, and in 2010, he enjoyed a highly successful tour as a member of The Dukes of September Rhythm Review, with Michael McDonald and Donald Fagen.

Tower of Power
For well close to five decades, Tower of Power has delivered the best in Rhythm and Blues music. But, as group co-founder Emilio Castillo says, they could have had a much different name.

"We were a Soul band called The Motowns." he recalls. Rocco Prestia was the bass player, I was in there, and my brother was the drummer. I met Doc Kupka at the Alameda County Fair over the Fourth of July weekend back in 1968, and gave him an audition. He came in the band, and we eventually changed our name to the Tower of Power." The reason for the band name change was that they had a specific goal in mind.

"We wanted to get into the Fillmore Auditorium and with a name like the Motowns, dressed in suits with razor cuts, we knew we'd never get in there. We grew our hair long, and started to be hippies, and changed our name. Doc then suggested to me that we should start writing our own songs. Our first song was 'You're Still A Young Man."

The gig at the Fillmore was a major goal for the band, which incidentally came along at just the right time. "At the time, we had been playing nightclubs, and we had gotten busted for being underage. We had been playing underage in nightclubs for years. That's all we knew. One night, the ABC came in, and caught the trumpet player drinking a screwdriver, and the next thing we knew, they put a notice out to all the clubs in the Bay Area that if they hired us again, they would lose their liquor license. We found ourselves with no work and no money. My parents had moved to Detroit and I was on my own for the first time. I was broke and hungry, and all I did was rehearse. We wrote the songs for the East Bay Grease record, and we practiced them every day. By the time November came around, we were at the end of our rope. I told the guys that I was going to Detroit for the holidays to see my parents, and if nothing happened with this audition, I wasn't coming back."

Fortunately, he did have to make a return trip to the Bay Area. "A couple of days later, Doc called me, and said 'You've gotta come back. He dug it." I said 'Who dug it?" He said 'Bill Graham.' As it turned out, Bill and David Rubinson – the producer for his new label, San Francisco Records - liked the band because we were soulful. Everyone had grown out of the whole psychedelic thing. Bands like Jefferson Airplane and Grateful Dead had been happening for about three years. The collective ear of the Bay Area was ready for something soulful. That's right when we came along."

Their first record, East Bay Grease, helped to define the East Bay sound, and did well enough to warrant a recording contract with Warner Brothers. Bump City, their 1972 debut for the label, was a hit on both the Billboard 200 and the chart's R&B Albums chart, and netted them the hits "You're Still A Young Man" and "Down To The Nightclub." The decade of the 1970s were a boom period for the group, who hit with radio classics like "So Very Hard To Go" and "What Is Hip?" and the band has continued to tour and record over the years with their latest project Hipper Than Hip being a live flash back to their 1974 tour. Castillo says their love of the stage is the same today as it was back in 1968.

"I still love it as much as ever. We're not a smooth jazz band, or a retro band...we don't follow trends, we just make our music exactly the way we want it to be. We noticed years ago that when we did that, the fans liked it. We stay true to that, and that makes it easy to go to work on a daily basis. Every time we go to play, we're playing music we love because we got to make it our way" The thrill of stepping on stage has never gone away, because as Castillo says, he loves the attention. "Let's face it. Musicians are some of the most self-centered people in the world. So, that never gets old. People ask what it feels like to hear your song on the radio. It never gets old. What's it like to see yourself on TV? Again, it never gets old."

In 2014, Tower of Power will be on the road – a lot – as a result of their tour with Journey and the Steve Miller Band. He credits their involvement to an old friend, Journey guitarist Neal Schon. "We've known him for years, back to when he was hired to play in Carlos Santana's band as an extra guitarist. When we were new, Carlos really dug the band, and he used to take us on tour – even when people around the nation didn't know us. Some of those nights, we were playing at a high level, and gave him a good run for his money. He liked that. He liked being challenged. It made him play better. At the time, Neil was in the band, and we've known him ever since then. About a year or two ago, he noticed our presence was becoming a little more known on the Internet and TV. He came to a few gigs, and the next thing we know, we get this offer to tour," he says with a smile.

Fans that come out to see Tower of Power this year will get a look at their brand new lead singer, Ray Greene. Castillo says he's a perfect fit. "It's phenomenal. Most bands lose their singer, and it's over. But, we've changed singers and other players so many times, the fans actually get excited about who's next." he said, as the band has had over forty members throughout their history. "I worked on finding a new singer for about a year, and prayed about it a lot. I found out about Ray, and he's amazing. All the guys come on stage, and we just think 'Wow. God has really blessed us.' He's doing a great job, and has a great personality. One of the things you learn when you've been in the business as long as I have is to hire good people with principles because you're going to spend as much as twenty hours a day with these guys. Ray's got everything – he looks great, he sings great, he's a good person. We're just really blessed to have him."

With a new member comes a new attitude, and Emilio says it's contagious. "Everybody in the band is saying 'Wow, what is happening?' You get to an age where we're at and things can start to run down but it seems like for us that things are really kicking into high gear."

And, that's the way Tower of Power likes it!

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Boz Scaggs (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

BOZ SCAGGS with special guest TOWER OF POWER
Grammy-Award winning rock legend Boz Scaggs joins "Urban Soul Music" Tower of Power for this unforgettable night of hits.

Boz Scaggs
Singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, best known as a member of the Steve Miller Band, was born William Royce Scaggs in Canton, Ohio in 1944. As a child, he lived first in Oklahoma and then Texas, where he picked up his nickname Boz. He encountered Steve Miller when he was still in school, and having already learned the guitar, Scaggs paired up with Miller as a musical duo.

Later, as a young man, Boz Scaggs left for London and spent some time performing with such bands as Mother Earth and the Wigs, before recording his solo debut, Boz, in 1965. He returned to the United States, heading for San Francisco, and joined up with Steve Miller again in 1987. Scaggs joined Miller for the albums Children of the Future and Sailor, but shortly thereafter Boz signed a record deal as a solo artist, and his second album, Boz Scaggs, was released in 1969.

The 1970s brought Boz Scaggs his greatest success as a solo artist. Moments, released in 1971, was followed by My Time in 1972 and Slow Dancer in 1974, but it was Silk Degrees in 1976 that reached the top of the charts and gave audiences the hit singles "Lowdown" and "Lido Shuffle." Down Two Then Left (1977) and Middle Man (1980) were equally successful, spawning the singles "Jo Jo" and "Breakdown Dead Ahead."

Boz Scaggs took a hiatus for most of the 1980s, but returned in 1988 with Other Roads. Some Change followed in 1994, and Come on Home and My Time: The Anthology after that in 1997. In 2003, Boz Scaggs explored his love of jazz with his album But Beautiful.
When not growing grapes and producing wine with his family in California's Napa Valley, Boz Scaggs hits the stage for regular tours, nearly every summer. Scaggs maintains a steady fan base that continues to support his live performances, and in 2010, he enjoyed a highly successful tour as a member of The Dukes of September Rhythm Review, with Michael McDonald and Donald Fagen.

Tower of Power
For well close to five decades, Tower of Power has delivered the best in Rhythm and Blues music. But, as group co-founder Emilio Castillo says, they could have had a much different name.

"We were a Soul band called The Motowns." he recalls. Rocco Prestia was the bass player, I was in there, and my brother was the drummer. I met Doc Kupka at the Alameda County Fair over the Fourth of July weekend back in 1968, and gave him an audition. He came in the band, and we eventually changed our name to the Tower of Power." The reason for the band name change was that they had a specific goal in mind.

"We wanted to get into the Fillmore Auditorium and with a name like the Motowns, dressed in suits with razor cuts, we knew we'd never get in there. We grew our hair long, and started to be hippies, and changed our name. Doc then suggested to me that we should start writing our own songs. Our first song was 'You're Still A Young Man."

The gig at the Fillmore was a major goal for the band, which incidentally came along at just the right time. "At the time, we had been playing nightclubs, and we had gotten busted for being underage. We had been playing underage in nightclubs for years. That's all we knew. One night, the ABC came in, and caught the trumpet player drinking a screwdriver, and the next thing we knew, they put a notice out to all the clubs in the Bay Area that if they hired us again, they would lose their liquor license. We found ourselves with no work and no money. My parents had moved to Detroit and I was on my own for the first time. I was broke and hungry, and all I did was rehearse. We wrote the songs for the East Bay Grease record, and we practiced them every day. By the time November came around, we were at the end of our rope. I told the guys that I was going to Detroit for the holidays to see my parents, and if nothing happened with this audition, I wasn't coming back."

Fortunately, he did have to make a return trip to the Bay Area. "A couple of days later, Doc called me, and said 'You've gotta come back. He dug it." I said 'Who dug it?" He said 'Bill Graham.' As it turned out, Bill and David Rubinson – the producer for his new label, San Francisco Records - liked the band because we were soulful. Everyone had grown out of the whole psychedelic thing. Bands like Jefferson Airplane and Grateful Dead had been happening for about three years. The collective ear of the Bay Area was ready for something soulful. That's right when we came along."

Their first record, East Bay Grease, helped to define the East Bay sound, and did well enough to warrant a recording contract with Warner Brothers. Bump City, their 1972 debut for the label, was a hit on both the Billboard 200 and the chart's R&B Albums chart, and netted them the hits "You're Still A Young Man" and "Down To The Nightclub." The decade of the 1970s were a boom period for the group, who hit with radio classics like "So Very Hard To Go" and "What Is Hip?" and the band has continued to tour and record over the years with their latest project Hipper Than Hip being a live flash back to their 1974 tour. Castillo says their love of the stage is the same today as it was back in 1968.

"I still love it as much as ever. We're not a smooth jazz band, or a retro band...we don't follow trends, we just make our music exactly the way we want it to be. We noticed years ago that when we did that, the fans liked it. We stay true to that, and that makes it easy to go to work on a daily basis. Every time we go to play, we're playing music we love because we got to make it our way" The thrill of stepping on stage has never gone away, because as Castillo says, he loves the attention. "Let's face it. Musicians are some of the most self-centered people in the world. So, that never gets old. People ask what it feels like to hear your song on the radio. It never gets old. What's it like to see yourself on TV? Again, it never gets old."

In 2014, Tower of Power will be on the road – a lot – as a result of their tour with Journey and the Steve Miller Band. He credits their involvement to an old friend, Journey guitarist Neal Schon. "We've known him for years, back to when he was hired to play in Carlos Santana's band as an extra guitarist. When we were new, Carlos really dug the band, and he used to take us on tour – even when people around the nation didn't know us. Some of those nights, we were playing at a high level, and gave him a good run for his money. He liked that. He liked being challenged. It made him play better. At the time, Neil was in the band, and we've known him ever since then. About a year or two ago, he noticed our presence was becoming a little more known on the Internet and TV. He came to a few gigs, and the next thing we know, we get this offer to tour," he says with a smile.

Fans that come out to see Tower of Power this year will get a look at their brand new lead singer, Ray Greene. Castillo says he's a perfect fit. "It's phenomenal. Most bands lose their singer, and it's over. But, we've changed singers and other players so many times, the fans actually get excited about who's next." he said, as the band has had over forty members throughout their history. "I worked on finding a new singer for about a year, and prayed about it a lot. I found out about Ray, and he's amazing. All the guys come on stage, and we just think 'Wow. God has really blessed us.' He's doing a great job, and has a great personality. One of the things you learn when you've been in the business as long as I have is to hire good people with principles because you're going to spend as much as twenty hours a day with these guys. Ray's got everything – he looks great, he sings great, he's a good person. We're just really blessed to have him."

With a new member comes a new attitude, and Emilio says it's contagious. "Everybody in the band is saying 'Wow, what is happening?' You get to an age where we're at and things can start to run down but it seems like for us that things are really kicking into high gear."

And, that's the way Tower of Power likes it!

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Boz Scaggs (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

BOZ SCAGGS with special guest TOWER OF POWER
Grammy-Award winning rock legend Boz Scaggs joins "Urban Soul Music" Tower of Power for this unforgettable night of hits.

Boz Scaggs
Singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, best known as a member of the Steve Miller Band, was born William Royce Scaggs in Canton, Ohio in 1944. As a child, he lived first in Oklahoma and then Texas, where he picked up his nickname Boz. He encountered Steve Miller when he was still in school, and having already learned the guitar, Scaggs paired up with Miller as a musical duo.

Later, as a young man, Boz Scaggs left for London and spent some time performing with such bands as Mother Earth and the Wigs, before recording his solo debut, Boz, in 1965. He returned to the United States, heading for San Francisco, and joined up with Steve Miller again in 1987. Scaggs joined Miller for the albums Children of the Future and Sailor, but shortly thereafter Boz signed a record deal as a solo artist, and his second album, Boz Scaggs, was released in 1969.

The 1970s brought Boz Scaggs his greatest success as a solo artist. Moments, released in 1971, was followed by My Time in 1972 and Slow Dancer in 1974, but it was Silk Degrees in 1976 that reached the top of the charts and gave audiences the hit singles "Lowdown" and "Lido Shuffle." Down Two Then Left (1977) and Middle Man (1980) were equally successful, spawning the singles "Jo Jo" and "Breakdown Dead Ahead."

Boz Scaggs took a hiatus for most of the 1980s, but returned in 1988 with Other Roads. Some Change followed in 1994, and Come on Home and My Time: The Anthology after that in 1997. In 2003, Boz Scaggs explored his love of jazz with his album But Beautiful.
When not growing grapes and producing wine with his family in California's Napa Valley, Boz Scaggs hits the stage for regular tours, nearly every summer. Scaggs maintains a steady fan base that continues to support his live performances, and in 2010, he enjoyed a highly successful tour as a member of The Dukes of September Rhythm Review, with Michael McDonald and Donald Fagen.

Tower of Power
For well close to five decades, Tower of Power has delivered the best in Rhythm and Blues music. But, as group co-founder Emilio Castillo says, they could have had a much different name.

"We were a Soul band called The Motowns." he recalls. Rocco Prestia was the bass player, I was in there, and my brother was the drummer. I met Doc Kupka at the Alameda County Fair over the Fourth of July weekend back in 1968, and gave him an audition. He came in the band, and we eventually changed our name to the Tower of Power." The reason for the band name change was that they had a specific goal in mind.

"We wanted to get into the Fillmore Auditorium and with a name like the Motowns, dressed in suits with razor cuts, we knew we'd never get in there. We grew our hair long, and started to be hippies, and changed our name. Doc then suggested to me that we should start writing our own songs. Our first song was 'You're Still A Young Man."

The gig at the Fillmore was a major goal for the band, which incidentally came along at just the right time. "At the time, we had been playing nightclubs, and we had gotten busted for being underage. We had been playing underage in nightclubs for years. That's all we knew. One night, the ABC came in, and caught the trumpet player drinking a screwdriver, and the next thing we knew, they put a notice out to all the clubs in the Bay Area that if they hired us again, they would lose their liquor license. We found ourselves with no work and no money. My parents had moved to Detroit and I was on my own for the first time. I was broke and hungry, and all I did was rehearse. We wrote the songs for the East Bay Grease record, and we practiced them every day. By the time November came around, we were at the end of our rope. I told the guys that I was going to Detroit for the holidays to see my parents, and if nothing happened with this audition, I wasn't coming back."

Fortunately, he did have to make a return trip to the Bay Area. "A couple of days later, Doc called me, and said 'You've gotta come back. He dug it." I said 'Who dug it?" He said 'Bill Graham.' As it turned out, Bill and David Rubinson – the producer for his new label, San Francisco Records - liked the band because we were soulful. Everyone had grown out of the whole psychedelic thing. Bands like Jefferson Airplane and Grateful Dead had been happening for about three years. The collective ear of the Bay Area was ready for something soulful. That's right when we came along."

Their first record, East Bay Grease, helped to define the East Bay sound, and did well enough to warrant a recording contract with Warner Brothers. Bump City, their 1972 debut for the label, was a hit on both the Billboard 200 and the chart's R&B Albums chart, and netted them the hits "You're Still A Young Man" and "Down To The Nightclub." The decade of the 1970s were a boom period for the group, who hit with radio classics like "So Very Hard To Go" and "What Is Hip?" and the band has continued to tour and record over the years with their latest project Hipper Than Hip being a live flash back to their 1974 tour. Castillo says their love of the stage is the same today as it was back in 1968.

"I still love it as much as ever. We're not a smooth jazz band, or a retro band...we don't follow trends, we just make our music exactly the way we want it to be. We noticed years ago that when we did that, the fans liked it. We stay true to that, and that makes it easy to go to work on a daily basis. Every time we go to play, we're playing music we love because we got to make it our way" The thrill of stepping on stage has never gone away, because as Castillo says, he loves the attention. "Let's face it. Musicians are some of the most self-centered people in the world. So, that never gets old. People ask what it feels like to hear your song on the radio. It never gets old. What's it like to see yourself on TV? Again, it never gets old."

In 2014, Tower of Power will be on the road – a lot – as a result of their tour with Journey and the Steve Miller Band. He credits their involvement to an old friend, Journey guitarist Neal Schon. "We've known him for years, back to when he was hired to play in Carlos Santana's band as an extra guitarist. When we were new, Carlos really dug the band, and he used to take us on tour – even when people around the nation didn't know us. Some of those nights, we were playing at a high level, and gave him a good run for his money. He liked that. He liked being challenged. It made him play better. At the time, Neil was in the band, and we've known him ever since then. About a year or two ago, he noticed our presence was becoming a little more known on the Internet and TV. He came to a few gigs, and the next thing we know, we get this offer to tour," he says with a smile.

Fans that come out to see Tower of Power this year will get a look at their brand new lead singer, Ray Greene. Castillo says he's a perfect fit. "It's phenomenal. Most bands lose their singer, and it's over. But, we've changed singers and other players so many times, the fans actually get excited about who's next." he said, as the band has had over forty members throughout their history. "I worked on finding a new singer for about a year, and prayed about it a lot. I found out about Ray, and he's amazing. All the guys come on stage, and we just think 'Wow. God has really blessed us.' He's doing a great job, and has a great personality. One of the things you learn when you've been in the business as long as I have is to hire good people with principles because you're going to spend as much as twenty hours a day with these guys. Ray's got everything – he looks great, he sings great, he's a good person. We're just really blessed to have him."

With a new member comes a new attitude, and Emilio says it's contagious. "Everybody in the band is saying 'Wow, what is happening?' You get to an age where we're at and things can start to run down but it seems like for us that things are really kicking into high gear."

And, that's the way Tower of Power likes it!

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Boz Scaggs (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

BOZ SCAGGS with special guest TOWER OF POWER
Grammy-Award winning rock legend Boz Scaggs joins "Urban Soul Music" Tower of Power for this unforgettable night of hits.

Boz Scaggs
Singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, best known as a member of the Steve Miller Band, was born William Royce Scaggs in Canton, Ohio in 1944. As a child, he lived first in Oklahoma and then Texas, where he picked up his nickname Boz. He encountered Steve Miller when he was still in school, and having already learned the guitar, Scaggs paired up with Miller as a musical duo.

Later, as a young man, Boz Scaggs left for London and spent some time performing with such bands as Mother Earth and the Wigs, before recording his solo debut, Boz, in 1965. He returned to the United States, heading for San Francisco, and joined up with Steve Miller again in 1987. Scaggs joined Miller for the albums Children of the Future and Sailor, but shortly thereafter Boz signed a record deal as a solo artist, and his second album, Boz Scaggs, was released in 1969.

The 1970s brought Boz Scaggs his greatest success as a solo artist. Moments, released in 1971, was followed by My Time in 1972 and Slow Dancer in 1974, but it was Silk Degrees in 1976 that reached the top of the charts and gave audiences the hit singles "Lowdown" and "Lido Shuffle." Down Two Then Left (1977) and Middle Man (1980) were equally successful, spawning the singles "Jo Jo" and "Breakdown Dead Ahead."

Boz Scaggs took a hiatus for most of the 1980s, but returned in 1988 with Other Roads. Some Change followed in 1994, and Come on Home and My Time: The Anthology after that in 1997. In 2003, Boz Scaggs explored his love of jazz with his album But Beautiful.
When not growing grapes and producing wine with his family in California's Napa Valley, Boz Scaggs hits the stage for regular tours, nearly every summer. Scaggs maintains a steady fan base that continues to support his live performances, and in 2010, he enjoyed a highly successful tour as a member of The Dukes of September Rhythm Review, with Michael McDonald and Donald Fagen.

Tower of Power
For well close to five decades, Tower of Power has delivered the best in Rhythm and Blues music. But, as group co-founder Emilio Castillo says, they could have had a much different name.

"We were a Soul band called The Motowns." he recalls. Rocco Prestia was the bass player, I was in there, and my brother was the drummer. I met Doc Kupka at the Alameda County Fair over the Fourth of July weekend back in 1968, and gave him an audition. He came in the band, and we eventually changed our name to the Tower of Power." The reason for the band name change was that they had a specific goal in mind.

"We wanted to get into the Fillmore Auditorium and with a name like the Motowns, dressed in suits with razor cuts, we knew we'd never get in there. We grew our hair long, and started to be hippies, and changed our name. Doc then suggested to me that we should start writing our own songs. Our first song was 'You're Still A Young Man."

The gig at the Fillmore was a major goal for the band, which incidentally came along at just the right time. "At the time, we had been playing nightclubs, and we had gotten busted for being underage. We had been playing underage in nightclubs for years. That's all we knew. One night, the ABC came in, and caught the trumpet player drinking a screwdriver, and the next thing we knew, they put a notice out to all the clubs in the Bay Area that if they hired us again, they would lose their liquor license. We found ourselves with no work and no money. My parents had moved to Detroit and I was on my own for the first time. I was broke and hungry, and all I did was rehearse. We wrote the songs for the East Bay Grease record, and we practiced them every day. By the time November came around, we were at the end of our rope. I told the guys that I was going to Detroit for the holidays to see my parents, and if nothing happened with this audition, I wasn't coming back."

Fortunately, he did have to make a return trip to the Bay Area. "A couple of days later, Doc called me, and said 'You've gotta come back. He dug it." I said 'Who dug it?" He said 'Bill Graham.' As it turned out, Bill and David Rubinson – the producer for his new label, San Francisco Records - liked the band because we were soulful. Everyone had grown out of the whole psychedelic thing. Bands like Jefferson Airplane and Grateful Dead had been happening for about three years. The collective ear of the Bay Area was ready for something soulful. That's right when we came along."

Their first record, East Bay Grease, helped to define the East Bay sound, and did well enough to warrant a recording contract with Warner Brothers. Bump City, their 1972 debut for the label, was a hit on both the Billboard 200 and the chart's R&B Albums chart, and netted them the hits "You're Still A Young Man" and "Down To The Nightclub." The decade of the 1970s were a boom period for the group, who hit with radio classics like "So Very Hard To Go" and "What Is Hip?" and the band has continued to tour and record over the years with their latest project Hipper Than Hip being a live flash back to their 1974 tour. Castillo says their love of the stage is the same today as it was back in 1968.

"I still love it as much as ever. We're not a smooth jazz band, or a retro band...we don't follow trends, we just make our music exactly the way we want it to be. We noticed years ago that when we did that, the fans liked it. We stay true to that, and that makes it easy to go to work on a daily basis. Every time we go to play, we're playing music we love because we got to make it our way" The thrill of stepping on stage has never gone away, because as Castillo says, he loves the attention. "Let's face it. Musicians are some of the most self-centered people in the world. So, that never gets old. People ask what it feels like to hear your song on the radio. It never gets old. What's it like to see yourself on TV? Again, it never gets old."

In 2014, Tower of Power will be on the road – a lot – as a result of their tour with Journey and the Steve Miller Band. He credits their involvement to an old friend, Journey guitarist Neal Schon. "We've known him for years, back to when he was hired to play in Carlos Santana's band as an extra guitarist. When we were new, Carlos really dug the band, and he used to take us on tour – even when people around the nation didn't know us. Some of those nights, we were playing at a high level, and gave him a good run for his money. He liked that. He liked being challenged. It made him play better. At the time, Neil was in the band, and we've known him ever since then. About a year or two ago, he noticed our presence was becoming a little more known on the Internet and TV. He came to a few gigs, and the next thing we know, we get this offer to tour," he says with a smile.

Fans that come out to see Tower of Power this year will get a look at their brand new lead singer, Ray Greene. Castillo says he's a perfect fit. "It's phenomenal. Most bands lose their singer, and it's over. But, we've changed singers and other players so many times, the fans actually get excited about who's next." he said, as the band has had over forty members throughout their history. "I worked on finding a new singer for about a year, and prayed about it a lot. I found out about Ray, and he's amazing. All the guys come on stage, and we just think 'Wow. God has really blessed us.' He's doing a great job, and has a great personality. One of the things you learn when you've been in the business as long as I have is to hire good people with principles because you're going to spend as much as twenty hours a day with these guys. Ray's got everything – he looks great, he sings great, he's a good person. We're just really blessed to have him."

With a new member comes a new attitude, and Emilio says it's contagious. "Everybody in the band is saying 'Wow, what is happening?' You get to an age where we're at and things can start to run down but it seems like for us that things are really kicking into high gear."

And, that's the way Tower of Power likes it!

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Copland Festival - Faculty Showcase: Dance (8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/16/2015 7/16/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Copland in Context: "Dancing for Copland" & film screening (7pm, Mallory-Towsley)

Location: Mallory-Towsley Center for Arts Leadership

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

COPLAND IN CONTEXT: "DANCING FOR COPLAND" & FILM SCREENING OF "MARTHA GRAHAM IN PERFORMANCE: APPALACHIAN SPRING"
Interlochen alumna and Martha Graham artistic director Janet Eilber and Martha Graham ensemble members will take part in a panel discussion with Interlochen President Jeffrey S. Kimpton, before a film screening of Martha Graham in Performance: Appalachian Spring.

7/21/2015 7/21/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Copland in Context: Writing Toward a New America (8pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge and green vest.

Copland in Context: Writing Toward a New America
David Griffith, Director of Creative Writing at Interlochen Center for the Arts, will be joined by creative writing and theatre faculty in an evening of readings and reflection based on James Agee's "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men," the inspiration for Copland's opera, "The Tender Land."

7/27/2015 7/27/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Doobie Brothers (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

AN EVENING WITH THE DOOBIE BROTHERS
As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock. They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville.

As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy-winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock.  They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville. With the release of their new record Southbound, a collaboration with the top country stars of today, they are poised to introduce a new generation to these infectious, toe-tapping, iconic sing-alongs.

In 2011, the band began a new chapter of their career when they filmed a CMT "Crossroads" special with country superstar Luke Bryan, and appeared for the first time ever on the Grand Ole Opry. That story continues with the release of their new album Southbound on Arista Nashville, and their appearance on the 2014 CMA awards, where they performed "Listen To the Music" and "Takin it to the Streets" with long-time band member, Michael McDonald. The performances served as a highlight of the show and brought on country royalty like Jennifer Nettles, Hillary Scott (of Lady Antebellum), Hunter Hayes and Brad Paisley to join the Doobie Brothers in the iconic jam.

"Believe it or not, this is the first time we have ever re-recorded these hits in all these years," Tom Johnston says of recording Southbound. "The addition of all these amazing artists has added new creative energy to these songs. Since they sing on it with us we have gotten the opportunity to learn how other singers approach the music and it turned out great!" Johnston, Patrick Simmons, John McFee and Michael McDonald worked with country artists like Blake Shelton, Brad Paisley, Zac Brown Band, Toby Keith and many others to bring this exciting project to their fans.

The Doobie Brothers' Southbound Singer-songwriter-guitarist Simmons says, "We have entered a territory that we never imagined for ourselves, as far as being a part of the cultural landscape. It's kind of odd when you see your songs in television commercials and hear yourself as background music in a commercial business, but it's cool. I hear B.B. King in the same places. We're in good company"

The Doobies have rung up a glittering track record that would be the envy of any band. Beginning with their multi-million-selling sophomore collection Toulouse Street (1972), the Doobies have three multi-platinum, seventeen platinum and fourteen Gold albums. Their Best of the Doobies (1976) has sold more than eleven million copies – a rare "diamond record."   The Doobies propulsive roots-based, harmony-laden, guitar-driven style has sold more than 30 million albums.

Their number one singles "Black Water" (1974) and "What a Fool Believes" (1979), both gold, lead a catalog of indelible songs that include  "Jesus Is Just All Right," "Rockin' Down the Highway," "Long Train Runnin,'" "China Grove," "Take Me In Your Arms," Takin' it to the Streets," "Minute by Minute," "You Belong to Me," "The Doctor" and more. In all, the Doobies have tallied up five top 10 singles and 16 top 40 hits.

Formed in 1969 by Simmons, singer-songwriter-guitarist Tom Johnston, founding drummer John Hartman and bassist Dave Shogren, the Doobies made their mark with a run of punchy, melodic hits on Warner Bros. Records. They attained radio and chart ubiquity in the late '70s, when the group's expanded lineup was augmented by Michael McDonald, whose soaring lead vocals pushed the band to new commercial and critical heights.

The years have witnessed many changes in the Doobies, but the band's most recent studio lineup harkens back to their earliest days. Simmons and Johnston continue to front the group. And multi-instrumentalist John McFee's history with the Brothers dates back to 1978.

Simmons says, "The sound of the band is the same. Tom and I are still involved in writing the songs and arranging. It brings the sound of the early '70s back to the forefront. Tommy and I now have been working together longer than any other time the band has been in existence, steadily working every year, touring."

The Doobies' familiar and inimitable sound effortlessly draws from virtually every imaginable tributary of American music.

"We're basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas," says Johnston. "We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, rock 'n' roll. It's based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That's been the signature of the band."

He continues, "Think about the influences that come into this band. You take Pat, who comes from a folk-blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that – he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock 'n' roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix – John came from a country background when he started out, and was in a country band, Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he's played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it's got strings, he can play it."

The Doobies' unique blend of native styles came about with a lack of calculation that remains one of the key sources of their continuing appeal.

Simmons notes, "We didn't really sit around and think, 'Oh, we need this element or that element.' The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It's always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are."

While the Doobie Brothers continue to draw their sound from the deep well of the past, their music has always been grounded in the here-and-now, dating back to their very first hit single, issued at the height of the Vietnam War.

Johnston notes, "'Listen to the Music' was written thinking, 'Wouldn't it be great if world leaders could get together and, if they could communicated through music, as opposed to words, they might be able to find some sort of a bridge to get through our disagreements?'"
The ability of the Doobie Brothers' music to deal with the essentials of people's lives in direct, tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today.

Simmons says, "We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children's children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, 'My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I've loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now."

"And the songs that people all know, be it 'Listen to the Music' or 'Black Water' or 'China Grove,' are still getting played," Johnston adds. "Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they had something to say that resonated with people. I'd like to say this band has been relevant – it's been relevant musically, it's been relevant lyrically, and we've always put out a high quality of music."

The band took a five year respite then regrouped in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans' groups and children's charities, the Doobie Brothers have been taking their music to their fans regularly on tour.

Modest almost to a fault, the co-founders of the Doobie Brothers sometimes grope to define the characteristics that have led their band to become one of the country's most enduring musical institutions. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to his group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

"In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word 'hope,'" says Simmons. "We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we're just the same – we're still hopeful about the future. In my lifetime, there has always been struggle and challenge and some darkness, but with the sun shining through, and that's what we all live for. You have to look towards the future and recognize that as long as there are thoughtful, intelligent people on the planet, there's hope for the rest of us."

7/7/2015 7/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Doobie Brothers (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

AN EVENING WITH THE DOOBIE BROTHERS
As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock. They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville.

As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy-winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock.  They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville. With the release of their new record Southbound, a collaboration with the top country stars of today, they are poised to introduce a new generation to these infectious, toe-tapping, iconic sing-alongs.

In 2011, the band began a new chapter of their career when they filmed a CMT "Crossroads" special with country superstar Luke Bryan, and appeared for the first time ever on the Grand Ole Opry. That story continues with the release of their new album Southbound on Arista Nashville, and their appearance on the 2014 CMA awards, where they performed "Listen To the Music" and "Takin it to the Streets" with long-time band member, Michael McDonald. The performances served as a highlight of the show and brought on country royalty like Jennifer Nettles, Hillary Scott (of Lady Antebellum), Hunter Hayes and Brad Paisley to join the Doobie Brothers in the iconic jam.

"Believe it or not, this is the first time we have ever re-recorded these hits in all these years," Tom Johnston says of recording Southbound. "The addition of all these amazing artists has added new creative energy to these songs. Since they sing on it with us we have gotten the opportunity to learn how other singers approach the music and it turned out great!" Johnston, Patrick Simmons, John McFee and Michael McDonald worked with country artists like Blake Shelton, Brad Paisley, Zac Brown Band, Toby Keith and many others to bring this exciting project to their fans.

The Doobie Brothers' Southbound Singer-songwriter-guitarist Simmons says, "We have entered a territory that we never imagined for ourselves, as far as being a part of the cultural landscape. It's kind of odd when you see your songs in television commercials and hear yourself as background music in a commercial business, but it's cool. I hear B.B. King in the same places. We're in good company"

The Doobies have rung up a glittering track record that would be the envy of any band. Beginning with their multi-million-selling sophomore collection Toulouse Street (1972), the Doobies have three multi-platinum, seventeen platinum and fourteen Gold albums. Their Best of the Doobies (1976) has sold more than eleven million copies – a rare "diamond record."   The Doobies propulsive roots-based, harmony-laden, guitar-driven style has sold more than 30 million albums.

Their number one singles "Black Water" (1974) and "What a Fool Believes" (1979), both gold, lead a catalog of indelible songs that include  "Jesus Is Just All Right," "Rockin' Down the Highway," "Long Train Runnin,'" "China Grove," "Take Me In Your Arms," Takin' it to the Streets," "Minute by Minute," "You Belong to Me," "The Doctor" and more. In all, the Doobies have tallied up five top 10 singles and 16 top 40 hits.

Formed in 1969 by Simmons, singer-songwriter-guitarist Tom Johnston, founding drummer John Hartman and bassist Dave Shogren, the Doobies made their mark with a run of punchy, melodic hits on Warner Bros. Records. They attained radio and chart ubiquity in the late '70s, when the group's expanded lineup was augmented by Michael McDonald, whose soaring lead vocals pushed the band to new commercial and critical heights.

The years have witnessed many changes in the Doobies, but the band's most recent studio lineup harkens back to their earliest days. Simmons and Johnston continue to front the group. And multi-instrumentalist John McFee's history with the Brothers dates back to 1978.

Simmons says, "The sound of the band is the same. Tom and I are still involved in writing the songs and arranging. It brings the sound of the early '70s back to the forefront. Tommy and I now have been working together longer than any other time the band has been in existence, steadily working every year, touring."

The Doobies' familiar and inimitable sound effortlessly draws from virtually every imaginable tributary of American music.

"We're basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas," says Johnston. "We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, rock 'n' roll. It's based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That's been the signature of the band."

He continues, "Think about the influences that come into this band. You take Pat, who comes from a folk-blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that – he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock 'n' roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix – John came from a country background when he started out, and was in a country band, Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he's played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it's got strings, he can play it."

The Doobies' unique blend of native styles came about with a lack of calculation that remains one of the key sources of their continuing appeal.

Simmons notes, "We didn't really sit around and think, 'Oh, we need this element or that element.' The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It's always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are."

While the Doobie Brothers continue to draw their sound from the deep well of the past, their music has always been grounded in the here-and-now, dating back to their very first hit single, issued at the height of the Vietnam War.

Johnston notes, "'Listen to the Music' was written thinking, 'Wouldn't it be great if world leaders could get together and, if they could communicated through music, as opposed to words, they might be able to find some sort of a bridge to get through our disagreements?'"
The ability of the Doobie Brothers' music to deal with the essentials of people's lives in direct, tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today.

Simmons says, "We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children's children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, 'My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I've loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now."

"And the songs that people all know, be it 'Listen to the Music' or 'Black Water' or 'China Grove,' are still getting played," Johnston adds. "Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they had something to say that resonated with people. I'd like to say this band has been relevant – it's been relevant musically, it's been relevant lyrically, and we've always put out a high quality of music."

The band took a five year respite then regrouped in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans' groups and children's charities, the Doobie Brothers have been taking their music to their fans regularly on tour.

Modest almost to a fault, the co-founders of the Doobie Brothers sometimes grope to define the characteristics that have led their band to become one of the country's most enduring musical institutions. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to his group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

"In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word 'hope,'" says Simmons. "We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we're just the same – we're still hopeful about the future. In my lifetime, there has always been struggle and challenge and some darkness, but with the sun shining through, and that's what we all live for. You have to look towards the future and recognize that as long as there are thoughtful, intelligent people on the planet, there's hope for the rest of us."

7/7/2015 7/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Doobie Brothers (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

AN EVENING WITH THE DOOBIE BROTHERS
As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock. They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville.

As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy-winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock.  They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville. With the release of their new record Southbound, a collaboration with the top country stars of today, they are poised to introduce a new generation to these infectious, toe-tapping, iconic sing-alongs.

In 2011, the band began a new chapter of their career when they filmed a CMT "Crossroads" special with country superstar Luke Bryan, and appeared for the first time ever on the Grand Ole Opry. That story continues with the release of their new album Southbound on Arista Nashville, and their appearance on the 2014 CMA awards, where they performed "Listen To the Music" and "Takin it to the Streets" with long-time band member, Michael McDonald. The performances served as a highlight of the show and brought on country royalty like Jennifer Nettles, Hillary Scott (of Lady Antebellum), Hunter Hayes and Brad Paisley to join the Doobie Brothers in the iconic jam.

"Believe it or not, this is the first time we have ever re-recorded these hits in all these years," Tom Johnston says of recording Southbound. "The addition of all these amazing artists has added new creative energy to these songs. Since they sing on it with us we have gotten the opportunity to learn how other singers approach the music and it turned out great!" Johnston, Patrick Simmons, John McFee and Michael McDonald worked with country artists like Blake Shelton, Brad Paisley, Zac Brown Band, Toby Keith and many others to bring this exciting project to their fans.

The Doobie Brothers' Southbound Singer-songwriter-guitarist Simmons says, "We have entered a territory that we never imagined for ourselves, as far as being a part of the cultural landscape. It's kind of odd when you see your songs in television commercials and hear yourself as background music in a commercial business, but it's cool. I hear B.B. King in the same places. We're in good company"

The Doobies have rung up a glittering track record that would be the envy of any band. Beginning with their multi-million-selling sophomore collection Toulouse Street (1972), the Doobies have three multi-platinum, seventeen platinum and fourteen Gold albums. Their Best of the Doobies (1976) has sold more than eleven million copies – a rare "diamond record."   The Doobies propulsive roots-based, harmony-laden, guitar-driven style has sold more than 30 million albums.

Their number one singles "Black Water" (1974) and "What a Fool Believes" (1979), both gold, lead a catalog of indelible songs that include  "Jesus Is Just All Right," "Rockin' Down the Highway," "Long Train Runnin,'" "China Grove," "Take Me In Your Arms," Takin' it to the Streets," "Minute by Minute," "You Belong to Me," "The Doctor" and more. In all, the Doobies have tallied up five top 10 singles and 16 top 40 hits.

Formed in 1969 by Simmons, singer-songwriter-guitarist Tom Johnston, founding drummer John Hartman and bassist Dave Shogren, the Doobies made their mark with a run of punchy, melodic hits on Warner Bros. Records. They attained radio and chart ubiquity in the late '70s, when the group's expanded lineup was augmented by Michael McDonald, whose soaring lead vocals pushed the band to new commercial and critical heights.

The years have witnessed many changes in the Doobies, but the band's most recent studio lineup harkens back to their earliest days. Simmons and Johnston continue to front the group. And multi-instrumentalist John McFee's history with the Brothers dates back to 1978.

Simmons says, "The sound of the band is the same. Tom and I are still involved in writing the songs and arranging. It brings the sound of the early '70s back to the forefront. Tommy and I now have been working together longer than any other time the band has been in existence, steadily working every year, touring."

The Doobies' familiar and inimitable sound effortlessly draws from virtually every imaginable tributary of American music.

"We're basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas," says Johnston. "We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, rock 'n' roll. It's based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That's been the signature of the band."

He continues, "Think about the influences that come into this band. You take Pat, who comes from a folk-blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that – he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock 'n' roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix – John came from a country background when he started out, and was in a country band, Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he's played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it's got strings, he can play it."

The Doobies' unique blend of native styles came about with a lack of calculation that remains one of the key sources of their continuing appeal.

Simmons notes, "We didn't really sit around and think, 'Oh, we need this element or that element.' The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It's always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are."

While the Doobie Brothers continue to draw their sound from the deep well of the past, their music has always been grounded in the here-and-now, dating back to their very first hit single, issued at the height of the Vietnam War.

Johnston notes, "'Listen to the Music' was written thinking, 'Wouldn't it be great if world leaders could get together and, if they could communicated through music, as opposed to words, they might be able to find some sort of a bridge to get through our disagreements?'"
The ability of the Doobie Brothers' music to deal with the essentials of people's lives in direct, tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today.

Simmons says, "We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children's children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, 'My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I've loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now."

"And the songs that people all know, be it 'Listen to the Music' or 'Black Water' or 'China Grove,' are still getting played," Johnston adds. "Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they had something to say that resonated with people. I'd like to say this band has been relevant – it's been relevant musically, it's been relevant lyrically, and we've always put out a high quality of music."

The band took a five year respite then regrouped in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans' groups and children's charities, the Doobie Brothers have been taking their music to their fans regularly on tour.

Modest almost to a fault, the co-founders of the Doobie Brothers sometimes grope to define the characteristics that have led their band to become one of the country's most enduring musical institutions. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to his group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

"In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word 'hope,'" says Simmons. "We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we're just the same – we're still hopeful about the future. In my lifetime, there has always been struggle and challenge and some darkness, but with the sun shining through, and that's what we all live for. You have to look towards the future and recognize that as long as there are thoughtful, intelligent people on the planet, there's hope for the rest of us."

7/7/2015 7/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Doobie Brothers (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

AN EVENING WITH THE DOOBIE BROTHERS
As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock. They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville.

As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy-winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock.  They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville. With the release of their new record Southbound, a collaboration with the top country stars of today, they are poised to introduce a new generation to these infectious, toe-tapping, iconic sing-alongs.

In 2011, the band began a new chapter of their career when they filmed a CMT "Crossroads" special with country superstar Luke Bryan, and appeared for the first time ever on the Grand Ole Opry. That story continues with the release of their new album Southbound on Arista Nashville, and their appearance on the 2014 CMA awards, where they performed "Listen To the Music" and "Takin it to the Streets" with long-time band member, Michael McDonald. The performances served as a highlight of the show and brought on country royalty like Jennifer Nettles, Hillary Scott (of Lady Antebellum), Hunter Hayes and Brad Paisley to join the Doobie Brothers in the iconic jam.

"Believe it or not, this is the first time we have ever re-recorded these hits in all these years," Tom Johnston says of recording Southbound. "The addition of all these amazing artists has added new creative energy to these songs. Since they sing on it with us we have gotten the opportunity to learn how other singers approach the music and it turned out great!" Johnston, Patrick Simmons, John McFee and Michael McDonald worked with country artists like Blake Shelton, Brad Paisley, Zac Brown Band, Toby Keith and many others to bring this exciting project to their fans.

The Doobie Brothers' Southbound Singer-songwriter-guitarist Simmons says, "We have entered a territory that we never imagined for ourselves, as far as being a part of the cultural landscape. It's kind of odd when you see your songs in television commercials and hear yourself as background music in a commercial business, but it's cool. I hear B.B. King in the same places. We're in good company"

The Doobies have rung up a glittering track record that would be the envy of any band. Beginning with their multi-million-selling sophomore collection Toulouse Street (1972), the Doobies have three multi-platinum, seventeen platinum and fourteen Gold albums. Their Best of the Doobies (1976) has sold more than eleven million copies – a rare "diamond record."   The Doobies propulsive roots-based, harmony-laden, guitar-driven style has sold more than 30 million albums.

Their number one singles "Black Water" (1974) and "What a Fool Believes" (1979), both gold, lead a catalog of indelible songs that include  "Jesus Is Just All Right," "Rockin' Down the Highway," "Long Train Runnin,'" "China Grove," "Take Me In Your Arms," Takin' it to the Streets," "Minute by Minute," "You Belong to Me," "The Doctor" and more. In all, the Doobies have tallied up five top 10 singles and 16 top 40 hits.

Formed in 1969 by Simmons, singer-songwriter-guitarist Tom Johnston, founding drummer John Hartman and bassist Dave Shogren, the Doobies made their mark with a run of punchy, melodic hits on Warner Bros. Records. They attained radio and chart ubiquity in the late '70s, when the group's expanded lineup was augmented by Michael McDonald, whose soaring lead vocals pushed the band to new commercial and critical heights.

The years have witnessed many changes in the Doobies, but the band's most recent studio lineup harkens back to their earliest days. Simmons and Johnston continue to front the group. And multi-instrumentalist John McFee's history with the Brothers dates back to 1978.

Simmons says, "The sound of the band is the same. Tom and I are still involved in writing the songs and arranging. It brings the sound of the early '70s back to the forefront. Tommy and I now have been working together longer than any other time the band has been in existence, steadily working every year, touring."

The Doobies' familiar and inimitable sound effortlessly draws from virtually every imaginable tributary of American music.

"We're basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas," says Johnston. "We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, rock 'n' roll. It's based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That's been the signature of the band."

He continues, "Think about the influences that come into this band. You take Pat, who comes from a folk-blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that – he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock 'n' roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix – John came from a country background when he started out, and was in a country band, Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he's played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it's got strings, he can play it."

The Doobies' unique blend of native styles came about with a lack of calculation that remains one of the key sources of their continuing appeal.

Simmons notes, "We didn't really sit around and think, 'Oh, we need this element or that element.' The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It's always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are."

While the Doobie Brothers continue to draw their sound from the deep well of the past, their music has always been grounded in the here-and-now, dating back to their very first hit single, issued at the height of the Vietnam War.

Johnston notes, "'Listen to the Music' was written thinking, 'Wouldn't it be great if world leaders could get together and, if they could communicated through music, as opposed to words, they might be able to find some sort of a bridge to get through our disagreements?'"
The ability of the Doobie Brothers' music to deal with the essentials of people's lives in direct, tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today.

Simmons says, "We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children's children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, 'My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I've loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now."

"And the songs that people all know, be it 'Listen to the Music' or 'Black Water' or 'China Grove,' are still getting played," Johnston adds. "Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they had something to say that resonated with people. I'd like to say this band has been relevant – it's been relevant musically, it's been relevant lyrically, and we've always put out a high quality of music."

The band took a five year respite then regrouped in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans' groups and children's charities, the Doobie Brothers have been taking their music to their fans regularly on tour.

Modest almost to a fault, the co-founders of the Doobie Brothers sometimes grope to define the characteristics that have led their band to become one of the country's most enduring musical institutions. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to his group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

"In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word 'hope,'" says Simmons. "We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we're just the same – we're still hopeful about the future. In my lifetime, there has always been struggle and challenge and some darkness, but with the sun shining through, and that's what we all live for. You have to look towards the future and recognize that as long as there are thoughtful, intelligent people on the planet, there's hope for the rest of us."

7/7/2015 7/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Doobie Brothers (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

AN EVENING WITH THE DOOBIE BROTHERS
As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock. They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville.

As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy-winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock.  They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville. With the release of their new record Southbound, a collaboration with the top country stars of today, they are poised to introduce a new generation to these infectious, toe-tapping, iconic sing-alongs.

In 2011, the band began a new chapter of their career when they filmed a CMT "Crossroads" special with country superstar Luke Bryan, and appeared for the first time ever on the Grand Ole Opry. That story continues with the release of their new album Southbound on Arista Nashville, and their appearance on the 2014 CMA awards, where they performed "Listen To the Music" and "Takin it to the Streets" with long-time band member, Michael McDonald. The performances served as a highlight of the show and brought on country royalty like Jennifer Nettles, Hillary Scott (of Lady Antebellum), Hunter Hayes and Brad Paisley to join the Doobie Brothers in the iconic jam.

"Believe it or not, this is the first time we have ever re-recorded these hits in all these years," Tom Johnston says of recording Southbound. "The addition of all these amazing artists has added new creative energy to these songs. Since they sing on it with us we have gotten the opportunity to learn how other singers approach the music and it turned out great!" Johnston, Patrick Simmons, John McFee and Michael McDonald worked with country artists like Blake Shelton, Brad Paisley, Zac Brown Band, Toby Keith and many others to bring this exciting project to their fans.

The Doobie Brothers' Southbound Singer-songwriter-guitarist Simmons says, "We have entered a territory that we never imagined for ourselves, as far as being a part of the cultural landscape. It's kind of odd when you see your songs in television commercials and hear yourself as background music in a commercial business, but it's cool. I hear B.B. King in the same places. We're in good company"

The Doobies have rung up a glittering track record that would be the envy of any band. Beginning with their multi-million-selling sophomore collection Toulouse Street (1972), the Doobies have three multi-platinum, seventeen platinum and fourteen Gold albums. Their Best of the Doobies (1976) has sold more than eleven million copies – a rare "diamond record."   The Doobies propulsive roots-based, harmony-laden, guitar-driven style has sold more than 30 million albums.

Their number one singles "Black Water" (1974) and "What a Fool Believes" (1979), both gold, lead a catalog of indelible songs that include  "Jesus Is Just All Right," "Rockin' Down the Highway," "Long Train Runnin,'" "China Grove," "Take Me In Your Arms," Takin' it to the Streets," "Minute by Minute," "You Belong to Me," "The Doctor" and more. In all, the Doobies have tallied up five top 10 singles and 16 top 40 hits.

Formed in 1969 by Simmons, singer-songwriter-guitarist Tom Johnston, founding drummer John Hartman and bassist Dave Shogren, the Doobies made their mark with a run of punchy, melodic hits on Warner Bros. Records. They attained radio and chart ubiquity in the late '70s, when the group's expanded lineup was augmented by Michael McDonald, whose soaring lead vocals pushed the band to new commercial and critical heights.

The years have witnessed many changes in the Doobies, but the band's most recent studio lineup harkens back to their earliest days. Simmons and Johnston continue to front the group. And multi-instrumentalist John McFee's history with the Brothers dates back to 1978.

Simmons says, "The sound of the band is the same. Tom and I are still involved in writing the songs and arranging. It brings the sound of the early '70s back to the forefront. Tommy and I now have been working together longer than any other time the band has been in existence, steadily working every year, touring."

The Doobies' familiar and inimitable sound effortlessly draws from virtually every imaginable tributary of American music.

"We're basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas," says Johnston. "We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, rock 'n' roll. It's based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That's been the signature of the band."

He continues, "Think about the influences that come into this band. You take Pat, who comes from a folk-blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that – he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock 'n' roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix – John came from a country background when he started out, and was in a country band, Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he's played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it's got strings, he can play it."

The Doobies' unique blend of native styles came about with a lack of calculation that remains one of the key sources of their continuing appeal.

Simmons notes, "We didn't really sit around and think, 'Oh, we need this element or that element.' The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It's always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are."

While the Doobie Brothers continue to draw their sound from the deep well of the past, their music has always been grounded in the here-and-now, dating back to their very first hit single, issued at the height of the Vietnam War.

Johnston notes, "'Listen to the Music' was written thinking, 'Wouldn't it be great if world leaders could get together and, if they could communicated through music, as opposed to words, they might be able to find some sort of a bridge to get through our disagreements?'"
The ability of the Doobie Brothers' music to deal with the essentials of people's lives in direct, tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today.

Simmons says, "We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children's children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, 'My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I've loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now."

"And the songs that people all know, be it 'Listen to the Music' or 'Black Water' or 'China Grove,' are still getting played," Johnston adds. "Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they had something to say that resonated with people. I'd like to say this band has been relevant – it's been relevant musically, it's been relevant lyrically, and we've always put out a high quality of music."

The band took a five year respite then regrouped in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans' groups and children's charities, the Doobie Brothers have been taking their music to their fans regularly on tour.

Modest almost to a fault, the co-founders of the Doobie Brothers sometimes grope to define the characteristics that have led their band to become one of the country's most enduring musical institutions. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to his group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

"In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word 'hope,'" says Simmons. "We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we're just the same – we're still hopeful about the future. In my lifetime, there has always been struggle and challenge and some darkness, but with the sun shining through, and that's what we all live for. You have to look towards the future and recognize that as long as there are thoughtful, intelligent people on the planet, there's hope for the rest of us."

7/7/2015 7/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Doobie Brothers (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

AN EVENING WITH THE DOOBIE BROTHERS
As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock. They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville.

As durable as American steel, Northern California's four-time Grammy-winning Doobie Brothers sound has become part of America's musical firmament, sampled on dance records, reinterpreted on "American Idol," and a fixture on radio formats from top 40 to classic rock.  They continue to write and record new material, tour the world, boasting one of the most loyal fan bases in music, all while breaking new creative ground in the exploration of their musical connection with Nashville. With the release of their new record Southbound, a collaboration with the top country stars of today, they are poised to introduce a new generation to these infectious, toe-tapping, iconic sing-alongs.

In 2011, the band began a new chapter of their career when they filmed a CMT "Crossroads" special with country superstar Luke Bryan, and appeared for the first time ever on the Grand Ole Opry. That story continues with the release of their new album Southbound on Arista Nashville, and their appearance on the 2014 CMA awards, where they performed "Listen To the Music" and "Takin it to the Streets" with long-time band member, Michael McDonald. The performances served as a highlight of the show and brought on country royalty like Jennifer Nettles, Hillary Scott (of Lady Antebellum), Hunter Hayes and Brad Paisley to join the Doobie Brothers in the iconic jam.

"Believe it or not, this is the first time we have ever re-recorded these hits in all these years," Tom Johnston says of recording Southbound. "The addition of all these amazing artists has added new creative energy to these songs. Since they sing on it with us we have gotten the opportunity to learn how other singers approach the music and it turned out great!" Johnston, Patrick Simmons, John McFee and Michael McDonald worked with country artists like Blake Shelton, Brad Paisley, Zac Brown Band, Toby Keith and many others to bring this exciting project to their fans.

The Doobie Brothers' Southbound Singer-songwriter-guitarist Simmons says, "We have entered a territory that we never imagined for ourselves, as far as being a part of the cultural landscape. It's kind of odd when you see your songs in television commercials and hear yourself as background music in a commercial business, but it's cool. I hear B.B. King in the same places. We're in good company"

The Doobies have rung up a glittering track record that would be the envy of any band. Beginning with their multi-million-selling sophomore collection Toulouse Street (1972), the Doobies have three multi-platinum, seventeen platinum and fourteen Gold albums. Their Best of the Doobies (1976) has sold more than eleven million copies – a rare "diamond record."   The Doobies propulsive roots-based, harmony-laden, guitar-driven style has sold more than 30 million albums.

Their number one singles "Black Water" (1974) and "What a Fool Believes" (1979), both gold, lead a catalog of indelible songs that include  "Jesus Is Just All Right," "Rockin' Down the Highway," "Long Train Runnin,'" "China Grove," "Take Me In Your Arms," Takin' it to the Streets," "Minute by Minute," "You Belong to Me," "The Doctor" and more. In all, the Doobies have tallied up five top 10 singles and 16 top 40 hits.

Formed in 1969 by Simmons, singer-songwriter-guitarist Tom Johnston, founding drummer John Hartman and bassist Dave Shogren, the Doobies made their mark with a run of punchy, melodic hits on Warner Bros. Records. They attained radio and chart ubiquity in the late '70s, when the group's expanded lineup was augmented by Michael McDonald, whose soaring lead vocals pushed the band to new commercial and critical heights.

The years have witnessed many changes in the Doobies, but the band's most recent studio lineup harkens back to their earliest days. Simmons and Johnston continue to front the group. And multi-instrumentalist John McFee's history with the Brothers dates back to 1978.

Simmons says, "The sound of the band is the same. Tom and I are still involved in writing the songs and arranging. It brings the sound of the early '70s back to the forefront. Tommy and I now have been working together longer than any other time the band has been in existence, steadily working every year, touring."

The Doobies' familiar and inimitable sound effortlessly draws from virtually every imaginable tributary of American music.

"We're basically an American band – we cover a lot of areas," says Johnston. "We cover blues, R&B, country, bluegrass, rock 'n' roll. It's based on rhythms, rhythm structures, picking, and harmonies. That's been the signature of the band."

He continues, "Think about the influences that come into this band. You take Pat, who comes from a folk-blues background, with a lot of picking and stuff like that – he was a big fan of Rev. Gary Davis and Dave Van Ronk. I come from a blues, soul, R&B, and rock 'n' roll background. Then you stick John McFee into that mix – John came from a country background when he started out, and was in a country band, Southern Pacific. And he is a session musician – he's played with everybody from Steve Miller to Van Morrison to Elvis Costello. If it's got strings, he can play it."

The Doobies' unique blend of native styles came about with a lack of calculation that remains one of the key sources of their continuing appeal.

Simmons notes, "We didn't really sit around and think, 'Oh, we need this element or that element.' The music has always been an honest representation of whatever we happen to be working on at the time. We had all been playing music for a long time before we put the band together, and our roots influences are what come out. Those influences always overtake whatever conceptual ideas you might have. It's always been that way with this band — you always return to who you really are."

While the Doobie Brothers continue to draw their sound from the deep well of the past, their music has always been grounded in the here-and-now, dating back to their very first hit single, issued at the height of the Vietnam War.

Johnston notes, "'Listen to the Music' was written thinking, 'Wouldn't it be great if world leaders could get together and, if they could communicated through music, as opposed to words, they might be able to find some sort of a bridge to get through our disagreements?'"
The ability of the Doobie Brothers' music to deal with the essentials of people's lives in direct, tuneful, affecting songs has developed an audience that spans generations today.

Simmons says, "We have a hardcore fan base that has handed our music down through the years to their children and their children's children. Repeatedly, people go to our concerts and come up to us and say, 'My dad turned me on to you guys years ago, and I've loved you guys all this time, and my kids are listening to you now."

"And the songs that people all know, be it 'Listen to the Music' or 'Black Water' or 'China Grove,' are still getting played," Johnston adds. "Any song that stands the test of time for 40 years or is getting played around the country on a daily basis – that to me is a testament to the quality of the tunes, and that they had something to say that resonated with people. I'd like to say this band has been relevant – it's been relevant musically, it's been relevant lyrically, and we've always put out a high quality of music."

The band took a five year respite then regrouped in 1987 for a series of gigs benefiting veterans' groups and children's charities, the Doobie Brothers have been taking their music to their fans regularly on tour.

Modest almost to a fault, the co-founders of the Doobie Brothers sometimes grope to define the characteristics that have led their band to become one of the country's most enduring musical institutions. The fundamental appeal that has drawn listeners to his group for four decades may be best expressed by Simmons:

"In a certain sense, what this band has always had in common with everyone else is the word 'hope,'" says Simmons. "We hoped we would make some good music, and we hoped there would be some acceptance, and we hoped that things would get better in the world. In that respect, we're just the same – we're still hopeful about the future. In my lifetime, there has always been struggle and challenge and some darkness, but with the sun shining through, and that's what we all live for. You have to look towards the future and recognize that as long as there are thoughtful, intelligent people on the planet, there's hope for the rest of us."

7/7/2015 7/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Emerson String Quartet (8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

Emerson String Quartet

The Emerson String Quartet presents a Copland–inspired program featuring works by Copland and his contemporaries.

The Emerson String Quartet has an unparalleled list of achievements over three decades: more than thirty acclaimed recordings, nine Grammys® (including two for Best Classical Album), three Gramophone Awards, the Avery Fisher Prize, Musical America's "Ensemble of the Year" and collaborations with many of the greatest artists of our time.

The Emerson String Quartet has an unparalleled list of achievements over three decades: more than thirty acclaimed recordings, nine Grammys® (including two for Best Classical Album), three Gramophone Awards, the Avery Fisher Prize, Musical America's "Ensemble of the Year" and collaborations with many of the greatest artists of our time.

The arrival of Paul Watkins in 2013 has had a profound effect on the Emerson Quartet. Mr. Watkins, a distinguished soloist, award-winning conductor, and devoted chamber musician, joined the ensemble in its 37th season, and his dedication and enthusiasm have infused the Quartet with a warm, rich tone and a palpable joy in the collaborative process. The reconfigured group has been greeted with impressive accolades.

"One of the characteristics of the Emerson Quartet is that its players (the violinists Eugene Drucker and Philip Setzer and the violist Lawrence Dutton in addition, now, to Mr. Watkins) all have the ability and the instruments to produce a sweet and glossy sound — but do so sparingly. Instead, they establish a chromatic scale of timbres that range from dry and tart over clean and zesty all the way to lustrous and singing. Listening to them pass tiny rhythmic motifs around the group, I was struck by how evenly calibrated these timbres were."  The New York Times

The Quartet's summer season began with engagements in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and a pair of concerts in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Following a tour of Japan, the Quartet performed at the Ravinia, Tanglewood, Chamber Music Northwest, Aspen, Domaine Forget, Toronto, Austin, Norfolk, Cape Cod and Mostly Mozart festivals. In a season of over 80 quartet performances, mingled with the Quartet members' individual artistic commitments, Emerson highlights feature numerous concerts on both coasts and throughout North America. In October, Paul Watkins performs with the Emerson Quartet for the first time in Carnegie Hall.  The program includes the Schumann Piano Quintet with acclaimed pianist and colleague Yefim Bronfman. Multiple tours of Europe comprise dates in Austria, Ireland, Switzerland, France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The Quartet continues its series at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC for its 35th season, and, in May, is presented by colleagues David Finckel and Wu Han for the two final season concerts at Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in Alice Tully Hall. Guest artists Colin Carr and Paul Neubauer join the Emerson in a program that also includes the New York premiere of Lowell Liebermann's String Quartet No. 5, commissioned by a consortium of presenters through Music Accord.

As an exclusive artist for SONY Classical, the Emerson recently released Journeys, its second CD on that label, featuring Tchaikovsky's Souvenir de Florence and Schoenberg's Verklaerte Nacht. Future recordings are planned with Mr. Watkins.        

Formed in 1976 and based in New York City, the Emerson was one of the first quartets formed with two violinists alternating in the first chair position. In 2002, the Quartet began to stand for most of its concerts, with the cellist seated on a riser. The Emerson Quartet took its name from the American poet and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson and is Quartet-in-Residence at Stony Brook University. In January of 2015, the Quartet received the Richard J. Bogomolny National Service Award, Chamber Music America's highest honor, in recognition of its significant and lasting contribution to the chamber music field.

7/23/2015 7/23/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Faculty Showcase: Copland's Chamber Music (7/15 - 8pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 7:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge and green vest.

7/15/2015 7/15/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Faculty Showcase: Copland's Chamber Music (7/22 - 8pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 7:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge and green vest.

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Faculty Showcase: Copland's Chamber Music (7/30 - 8pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 7:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge and green vest.

7/30/2015 7/30/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Festival Choir (3pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 2:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Harry Connick, Jr. (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

HARRY CONNICK, JR.
Harry Connick, Jr.'s meteoric rise in the world of music was only a prelude to a multi-faceted career. This pianist, vocalist, composer, band leader, actor, and philanthropist has received awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage. Throughout his stellar career, Harry Connick, Jr. has earned three Grammy awards, two Emmy Awards, and two Tony nominations, and spearheaded efforts to help rebuild his hometown of New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Showered with awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage, Harry Connick, Jr. has exemplified excellence in every aspect of the entertainment world.  
 
The foundation of Connick's art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age of five. His career took off when he signed with Columbia Records at 18 years old and revealed his stunning piano technique and vivid musical imagination on his self-titled debut album. His follow-up album, "20," announced that Connick was equally gifted as a singer; but this was soon overshadowed by his multi-platinum success with the soundtrack for the hit comedy "When Harry Met Sally..." To date, Connick has released 29 albums, won three Grammy Awards and two Emmy Awards, and garnered sales of over 28 million albums. His most recent releases are "Smokey Mary" and "Every Man Should Know." 
 
In addition to his music career, Connick has also appeared on the screen and stage as an actor. Among his feature film credits are "Little Man Tate," "Copycat," "Hope Floats," "Memphis Belle," "Independence Day," "Life without Dick," "Mickey," "Basic," "P.S. I Love You," "New in Town," "Dolphin Tale," and "Dolphin Tale 2," the sequel to 2011's hit family film.   His voiceover skills were featured in "My Dog Skip" and "The Iron Giant."
 
On television, following his very successful stint as a mentor on "American Idol," he was invited to the judges' table for Seasons XIII and XIV.  The Los Angeles Times noted that viewers should tune in to Idol, "if only for Connick.  He's magnetic, as well as the most eager to hear new talent, the hardest to impress and the first to offer technical advice." While Entertainment Weekly raved that he brings a "frank honesty but also lighthearted energy" to the show, "offering thoughtful critiques" resulting in a "fun, rollicking viewing experience." In addition to American Idol, Connick is perhaps best known for his recurring role on "Will & Grace." He also appeared in an arc of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," and has graced audiences with his musical talents in several primetime specials, including "Harry for the Holidays," the animated tale "The Happy Elf" and the Emmy Award-winning PBS specials "Only You in Concert" and "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway."
 
His Broadway career boasts equal recognition, having received Tony Award nominations as both composer/lyricist for the musical "Thou Shalt Not" and as the lead in the Tony Award-winning revival of "The Pajama Game." He also has adapted "The Happy Elf" for children's theater, starred in the Broadway revival of "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and - on the 20th anniversary of his first Broadway concerts at the Lunt-Fontaine Theatre - brought his live show for an extended residency at the Neil Simon Theatre.
 
Not surprisingly, Connick has used his influence as an entertainer to further his charitable work. Following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, he created, along with fellow musician and New Orleanian Branford Marsalis, the Musicians' Village in the Upper Ninth Ward. The Village and its Centerpiece (the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music) provide homes for musicians and other displaced citizens, a community center with a performance hall, recording studio and after-school facilities for kids. His contributions to the post-Katrina effort have been acknowledged by a Redbook Strength and Spirit Award, an honorary degree from Tulane University and the 2012 Jefferson Award for Public Service.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Harry Connick, Jr. (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

HARRY CONNICK, JR.
Harry Connick, Jr.'s meteoric rise in the world of music was only a prelude to a multi-faceted career. This pianist, vocalist, composer, band leader, actor, and philanthropist has received awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage. Throughout his stellar career, Harry Connick, Jr. has earned three Grammy awards, two Emmy Awards, and two Tony nominations, and spearheaded efforts to help rebuild his hometown of New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Showered with awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage, Harry Connick, Jr. has exemplified excellence in every aspect of the entertainment world.  
 
The foundation of Connick's art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age of five. His career took off when he signed with Columbia Records at 18 years old and revealed his stunning piano technique and vivid musical imagination on his self-titled debut album. His follow-up album, "20," announced that Connick was equally gifted as a singer; but this was soon overshadowed by his multi-platinum success with the soundtrack for the hit comedy "When Harry Met Sally..." To date, Connick has released 29 albums, won three Grammy Awards and two Emmy Awards, and garnered sales of over 28 million albums. His most recent releases are "Smokey Mary" and "Every Man Should Know." 
 
In addition to his music career, Connick has also appeared on the screen and stage as an actor. Among his feature film credits are "Little Man Tate," "Copycat," "Hope Floats," "Memphis Belle," "Independence Day," "Life without Dick," "Mickey," "Basic," "P.S. I Love You," "New in Town," "Dolphin Tale," and "Dolphin Tale 2," the sequel to 2011's hit family film.   His voiceover skills were featured in "My Dog Skip" and "The Iron Giant."
 
On television, following his very successful stint as a mentor on "American Idol," he was invited to the judges' table for Seasons XIII and XIV.  The Los Angeles Times noted that viewers should tune in to Idol, "if only for Connick.  He's magnetic, as well as the most eager to hear new talent, the hardest to impress and the first to offer technical advice." While Entertainment Weekly raved that he brings a "frank honesty but also lighthearted energy" to the show, "offering thoughtful critiques" resulting in a "fun, rollicking viewing experience." In addition to American Idol, Connick is perhaps best known for his recurring role on "Will & Grace." He also appeared in an arc of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," and has graced audiences with his musical talents in several primetime specials, including "Harry for the Holidays," the animated tale "The Happy Elf" and the Emmy Award-winning PBS specials "Only You in Concert" and "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway."
 
His Broadway career boasts equal recognition, having received Tony Award nominations as both composer/lyricist for the musical "Thou Shalt Not" and as the lead in the Tony Award-winning revival of "The Pajama Game." He also has adapted "The Happy Elf" for children's theater, starred in the Broadway revival of "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and - on the 20th anniversary of his first Broadway concerts at the Lunt-Fontaine Theatre - brought his live show for an extended residency at the Neil Simon Theatre.
 
Not surprisingly, Connick has used his influence as an entertainer to further his charitable work. Following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, he created, along with fellow musician and New Orleanian Branford Marsalis, the Musicians' Village in the Upper Ninth Ward. The Village and its Centerpiece (the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music) provide homes for musicians and other displaced citizens, a community center with a performance hall, recording studio and after-school facilities for kids. His contributions to the post-Katrina effort have been acknowledged by a Redbook Strength and Spirit Award, an honorary degree from Tulane University and the 2012 Jefferson Award for Public Service.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Harry Connick, Jr. (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

HARRY CONNICK, JR.
Harry Connick, Jr.'s meteoric rise in the world of music was only a prelude to a multi-faceted career. This pianist, vocalist, composer, band leader, actor, and philanthropist has received awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage. Throughout his stellar career, Harry Connick, Jr. has earned three Grammy awards, two Emmy Awards, and two Tony nominations, and spearheaded efforts to help rebuild his hometown of New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Showered with awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage, Harry Connick, Jr. has exemplified excellence in every aspect of the entertainment world.  
 
The foundation of Connick's art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age of five. His career took off when he signed with Columbia Records at 18 years old and revealed his stunning piano technique and vivid musical imagination on his self-titled debut album. His follow-up album, "20," announced that Connick was equally gifted as a singer; but this was soon overshadowed by his multi-platinum success with the soundtrack for the hit comedy "When Harry Met Sally..." To date, Connick has released 29 albums, won three Grammy Awards and two Emmy Awards, and garnered sales of over 28 million albums. His most recent releases are "Smokey Mary" and "Every Man Should Know." 
 
In addition to his music career, Connick has also appeared on the screen and stage as an actor. Among his feature film credits are "Little Man Tate," "Copycat," "Hope Floats," "Memphis Belle," "Independence Day," "Life without Dick," "Mickey," "Basic," "P.S. I Love You," "New in Town," "Dolphin Tale," and "Dolphin Tale 2," the sequel to 2011's hit family film.   His voiceover skills were featured in "My Dog Skip" and "The Iron Giant."
 
On television, following his very successful stint as a mentor on "American Idol," he was invited to the judges' table for Seasons XIII and XIV.  The Los Angeles Times noted that viewers should tune in to Idol, "if only for Connick.  He's magnetic, as well as the most eager to hear new talent, the hardest to impress and the first to offer technical advice." While Entertainment Weekly raved that he brings a "frank honesty but also lighthearted energy" to the show, "offering thoughtful critiques" resulting in a "fun, rollicking viewing experience." In addition to American Idol, Connick is perhaps best known for his recurring role on "Will & Grace." He also appeared in an arc of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," and has graced audiences with his musical talents in several primetime specials, including "Harry for the Holidays," the animated tale "The Happy Elf" and the Emmy Award-winning PBS specials "Only You in Concert" and "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway."
 
His Broadway career boasts equal recognition, having received Tony Award nominations as both composer/lyricist for the musical "Thou Shalt Not" and as the lead in the Tony Award-winning revival of "The Pajama Game." He also has adapted "The Happy Elf" for children's theater, starred in the Broadway revival of "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and - on the 20th anniversary of his first Broadway concerts at the Lunt-Fontaine Theatre - brought his live show for an extended residency at the Neil Simon Theatre.
 
Not surprisingly, Connick has used his influence as an entertainer to further his charitable work. Following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, he created, along with fellow musician and New Orleanian Branford Marsalis, the Musicians' Village in the Upper Ninth Ward. The Village and its Centerpiece (the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music) provide homes for musicians and other displaced citizens, a community center with a performance hall, recording studio and after-school facilities for kids. His contributions to the post-Katrina effort have been acknowledged by a Redbook Strength and Spirit Award, an honorary degree from Tulane University and the 2012 Jefferson Award for Public Service.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Harry Connick, Jr. (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

HARRY CONNICK, JR.
Harry Connick, Jr.'s meteoric rise in the world of music was only a prelude to a multi-faceted career. This pianist, vocalist, composer, band leader, actor, and philanthropist has received awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage. Throughout his stellar career, Harry Connick, Jr. has earned three Grammy awards, two Emmy Awards, and two Tony nominations, and spearheaded efforts to help rebuild his hometown of New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Showered with awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage, Harry Connick, Jr. has exemplified excellence in every aspect of the entertainment world.  
 
The foundation of Connick's art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age of five. His career took off when he signed with Columbia Records at 18 years old and revealed his stunning piano technique and vivid musical imagination on his self-titled debut album. His follow-up album, "20," announced that Connick was equally gifted as a singer; but this was soon overshadowed by his multi-platinum success with the soundtrack for the hit comedy "When Harry Met Sally..." To date, Connick has released 29 albums, won three Grammy Awards and two Emmy Awards, and garnered sales of over 28 million albums. His most recent releases are "Smokey Mary" and "Every Man Should Know." 
 
In addition to his music career, Connick has also appeared on the screen and stage as an actor. Among his feature film credits are "Little Man Tate," "Copycat," "Hope Floats," "Memphis Belle," "Independence Day," "Life without Dick," "Mickey," "Basic," "P.S. I Love You," "New in Town," "Dolphin Tale," and "Dolphin Tale 2," the sequel to 2011's hit family film.   His voiceover skills were featured in "My Dog Skip" and "The Iron Giant."
 
On television, following his very successful stint as a mentor on "American Idol," he was invited to the judges' table for Seasons XIII and XIV.  The Los Angeles Times noted that viewers should tune in to Idol, "if only for Connick.  He's magnetic, as well as the most eager to hear new talent, the hardest to impress and the first to offer technical advice." While Entertainment Weekly raved that he brings a "frank honesty but also lighthearted energy" to the show, "offering thoughtful critiques" resulting in a "fun, rollicking viewing experience." In addition to American Idol, Connick is perhaps best known for his recurring role on "Will & Grace." He also appeared in an arc of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," and has graced audiences with his musical talents in several primetime specials, including "Harry for the Holidays," the animated tale "The Happy Elf" and the Emmy Award-winning PBS specials "Only You in Concert" and "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway."
 
His Broadway career boasts equal recognition, having received Tony Award nominations as both composer/lyricist for the musical "Thou Shalt Not" and as the lead in the Tony Award-winning revival of "The Pajama Game." He also has adapted "The Happy Elf" for children's theater, starred in the Broadway revival of "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and - on the 20th anniversary of his first Broadway concerts at the Lunt-Fontaine Theatre - brought his live show for an extended residency at the Neil Simon Theatre.
 
Not surprisingly, Connick has used his influence as an entertainer to further his charitable work. Following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, he created, along with fellow musician and New Orleanian Branford Marsalis, the Musicians' Village in the Upper Ninth Ward. The Village and its Centerpiece (the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music) provide homes for musicians and other displaced citizens, a community center with a performance hall, recording studio and after-school facilities for kids. His contributions to the post-Katrina effort have been acknowledged by a Redbook Strength and Spirit Award, an honorary degree from Tulane University and the 2012 Jefferson Award for Public Service.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Harry Connick, Jr. (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

HARRY CONNICK, JR.
Harry Connick, Jr.'s meteoric rise in the world of music was only a prelude to a multi-faceted career. This pianist, vocalist, composer, band leader, actor, and philanthropist has received awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage. Throughout his stellar career, Harry Connick, Jr. has earned three Grammy awards, two Emmy Awards, and two Tony nominations, and spearheaded efforts to help rebuild his hometown of New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Showered with awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage, Harry Connick, Jr. has exemplified excellence in every aspect of the entertainment world.  
 
The foundation of Connick's art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age of five. His career took off when he signed with Columbia Records at 18 years old and revealed his stunning piano technique and vivid musical imagination on his self-titled debut album. His follow-up album, "20," announced that Connick was equally gifted as a singer; but this was soon overshadowed by his multi-platinum success with the soundtrack for the hit comedy "When Harry Met Sally..." To date, Connick has released 29 albums, won three Grammy Awards and two Emmy Awards, and garnered sales of over 28 million albums. His most recent releases are "Smokey Mary" and "Every Man Should Know." 
 
In addition to his music career, Connick has also appeared on the screen and stage as an actor. Among his feature film credits are "Little Man Tate," "Copycat," "Hope Floats," "Memphis Belle," "Independence Day," "Life without Dick," "Mickey," "Basic," "P.S. I Love You," "New in Town," "Dolphin Tale," and "Dolphin Tale 2," the sequel to 2011's hit family film.   His voiceover skills were featured in "My Dog Skip" and "The Iron Giant."
 
On television, following his very successful stint as a mentor on "American Idol," he was invited to the judges' table for Seasons XIII and XIV.  The Los Angeles Times noted that viewers should tune in to Idol, "if only for Connick.  He's magnetic, as well as the most eager to hear new talent, the hardest to impress and the first to offer technical advice." While Entertainment Weekly raved that he brings a "frank honesty but also lighthearted energy" to the show, "offering thoughtful critiques" resulting in a "fun, rollicking viewing experience." In addition to American Idol, Connick is perhaps best known for his recurring role on "Will & Grace." He also appeared in an arc of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," and has graced audiences with his musical talents in several primetime specials, including "Harry for the Holidays," the animated tale "The Happy Elf" and the Emmy Award-winning PBS specials "Only You in Concert" and "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway."
 
His Broadway career boasts equal recognition, having received Tony Award nominations as both composer/lyricist for the musical "Thou Shalt Not" and as the lead in the Tony Award-winning revival of "The Pajama Game." He also has adapted "The Happy Elf" for children's theater, starred in the Broadway revival of "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and - on the 20th anniversary of his first Broadway concerts at the Lunt-Fontaine Theatre - brought his live show for an extended residency at the Neil Simon Theatre.
 
Not surprisingly, Connick has used his influence as an entertainer to further his charitable work. Following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, he created, along with fellow musician and New Orleanian Branford Marsalis, the Musicians' Village in the Upper Ninth Ward. The Village and its Centerpiece (the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music) provide homes for musicians and other displaced citizens, a community center with a performance hall, recording studio and after-school facilities for kids. His contributions to the post-Katrina effort have been acknowledged by a Redbook Strength and Spirit Award, an honorary degree from Tulane University and the 2012 Jefferson Award for Public Service.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Harry Connick, Jr. (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

HARRY CONNICK, JR.
Harry Connick, Jr.'s meteoric rise in the world of music was only a prelude to a multi-faceted career. This pianist, vocalist, composer, band leader, actor, and philanthropist has received awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage. Throughout his stellar career, Harry Connick, Jr. has earned three Grammy awards, two Emmy Awards, and two Tony nominations, and spearheaded efforts to help rebuild his hometown of New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Showered with awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances, and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage, Harry Connick, Jr. has exemplified excellence in every aspect of the entertainment world.  
 
The foundation of Connick's art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age of five. His career took off when he signed with Columbia Records at 18 years old and revealed his stunning piano technique and vivid musical imagination on his self-titled debut album. His follow-up album, "20," announced that Connick was equally gifted as a singer; but this was soon overshadowed by his multi-platinum success with the soundtrack for the hit comedy "When Harry Met Sally..." To date, Connick has released 29 albums, won three Grammy Awards and two Emmy Awards, and garnered sales of over 28 million albums. His most recent releases are "Smokey Mary" and "Every Man Should Know." 
 
In addition to his music career, Connick has also appeared on the screen and stage as an actor. Among his feature film credits are "Little Man Tate," "Copycat," "Hope Floats," "Memphis Belle," "Independence Day," "Life without Dick," "Mickey," "Basic," "P.S. I Love You," "New in Town," "Dolphin Tale," and "Dolphin Tale 2," the sequel to 2011's hit family film.   His voiceover skills were featured in "My Dog Skip" and "The Iron Giant."
 
On television, following his very successful stint as a mentor on "American Idol," he was invited to the judges' table for Seasons XIII and XIV.  The Los Angeles Times noted that viewers should tune in to Idol, "if only for Connick.  He's magnetic, as well as the most eager to hear new talent, the hardest to impress and the first to offer technical advice." While Entertainment Weekly raved that he brings a "frank honesty but also lighthearted energy" to the show, "offering thoughtful critiques" resulting in a "fun, rollicking viewing experience." In addition to American Idol, Connick is perhaps best known for his recurring role on "Will & Grace." He also appeared in an arc of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," and has graced audiences with his musical talents in several primetime specials, including "Harry for the Holidays," the animated tale "The Happy Elf" and the Emmy Award-winning PBS specials "Only You in Concert" and "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway."
 
His Broadway career boasts equal recognition, having received Tony Award nominations as both composer/lyricist for the musical "Thou Shalt Not" and as the lead in the Tony Award-winning revival of "The Pajama Game." He also has adapted "The Happy Elf" for children's theater, starred in the Broadway revival of "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and - on the 20th anniversary of his first Broadway concerts at the Lunt-Fontaine Theatre - brought his live show for an extended residency at the Neil Simon Theatre.
 
Not surprisingly, Connick has used his influence as an entertainer to further his charitable work. Following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, he created, along with fellow musician and New Orleanian Branford Marsalis, the Musicians' Village in the Upper Ninth Ward. The Village and its Centerpiece (the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music) provide homes for musicians and other displaced citizens, a community center with a performance hall, recording studio and after-school facilities for kids. His contributions to the post-Katrina effort have been acknowledged by a Redbook Strength and Spirit Award, an honorary degree from Tulane University and the 2012 Jefferson Award for Public Service.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Jazz - 7/17 (8pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at Dendrinos Chapel no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/17/2015 7/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Jazz - 7/29 (8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson

Please arrive at Corson no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/29/2015 7/29/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Jazz - 7/9 (8pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at Dendrinos Chapel no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/9/2015 7/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre Workshop (1pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 12:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/17/2015 7/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre Workshop (7pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/17/2015 7/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Opera Scenes - 7/28 (7:30pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at Dendrinos Chapel no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/28/2015 7/28/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Opera Scenes - 7/29 (7:30pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at Dendrinos Chapel no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/29/2015 7/29/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Rep Theatre "Failure: A Love Story" - 7/31 (7pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/31/2015 7/31/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Rock & Roll (8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson

Please arrive at Corson no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/9/2015 7/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
ICO/IWS/ISO - 7/17 (7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Intermediate Concert Orchestra/Intermediate Wind Symphony/Intermediate Symphony Orchestra

7/17/2015 7/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
ICO/IWS/ISO - 7/29 (6:30pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Intermediate Concert Orchestra/Intermediate Wind Symphony/Intermediate Symphony Orchestra

7/29/2015 7/29/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
ICO/IWS/ISO - 7/8 (6:30pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Intermediate Concert Orchestra/Intermediate Wind Symphony/Intermediate Symphony Orchestra

7/8/2015 7/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen "Collage" - Dress Rehearsal (7:30pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

INTERLOCHEN "COLLAGE" - Dress Rehearsal
One of Interlochen’s most popular events, “Collage” is a rapid-fire sampler of student performances, encompassing music, dance, theatre, creative writing, film and visual arts. Come early for pre-concert activities on the mall.

7/13/2015 7/13/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen "Collage" (7:30pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

INTERLOCHEN "COLLAGE" 
One of Interlochen’s most popular events, “Collage” is a rapid-fire sampler of student performances, encompassing music, dance, theatre, creative writing, film and visual arts. Come early for pre-concert activities on the mall.

 

7/14/2015 7/14/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen "Collage" (7:30pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

INTERLOCHEN "COLLAGE" 
One of Interlochen’s most popular events, “Collage” is a rapid-fire sampler of student performances, encompassing music, dance, theatre, creative writing, film and visual arts. Come early for pre-concert activities on the mall.

7/14/2015 7/14/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen "Collage" (7:30pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:15 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

INTERLOCHEN "COLLAGE" 
One of Interlochen’s most popular events, “Collage” is a rapid-fire sampler of student performances, encompassing music, dance, theatre, creative writing, film and visual arts. Come early for pre-concert activities on the mall.

7/14/2015 7/14/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen "Collage" (7:30pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

INTERLOCHEN "COLLAGE" 
One of Interlochen’s most popular events, “Collage” is a rapid-fire sampler of student performances, encompassing music, dance, theatre, creative writing, film and visual arts. Come early for pre-concert activities on the mall.

 

7/14/2015 7/14/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen "Collage" (7:30pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:15 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

INTERLOCHEN "COLLAGE" 
One of Interlochen’s most popular events, “Collage” is a rapid-fire sampler of student performances, encompassing music, dance, theatre, creative writing, film and visual arts. Come early for pre-concert activities on the mall.

7/14/2015 7/14/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen "Collage" (7:30pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

INTERLOCHEN "COLLAGE" 
One of Interlochen’s most popular events, “Collage” is a rapid-fire sampler of student performances, encompassing music, dance, theatre, creative writing, film and visual arts. Come early for pre-concert activities on the mall.

7/14/2015 7/14/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen Philharmonic - 7/12 (3pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 2:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen Philharmonic - 7/19 (3pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 2:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen Philharmonic - 7/26 (4pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 3:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen Summer Dance Ens (8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

 

7/17/2015 7/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Junior Div. Final Concert - 7/10 (6pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 5:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Junior Division Final includes Band, String Ensemble, String Orchestra, and Choir.

7/10/2015 7/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Junior Div. Final Concert - 7/24 (6pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 5:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Junior Division Final includes Band, String Ensemble, String Orchestra, and Choir.

7/24/2015 7/24/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Martha Graham Dance Company (8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

Martha Graham Dance Company
As the oldest and most celebrated modern dance company in America, the Martha Graham Dance Company created and still embodies a timeless and uniquely American style of dance that has influenced generations of artists and continues to captivate audiences worldwide. This includes "Appalachian Spring," for which Aaron Copland composed the score and was awarded the 1945 Pulitzer Prize.

Martha Graham and her Company have expanded contemporary dance's vocabulary of movement and forever altered the scope of the art form by rooting works in contemporary social, political, psychological, and sexual contexts, deepening their impact and resonance.

Always a fertile ground for experimentation, Martha Graham Dance Company has been an unparalleled resource in nurturing many of the leading choreographers and dancers of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Merce Cunningham, Erick Hawkins, Pearl Lang, Pascal Rioult, and Paul Taylor. Graham's repertoire of 181 works has also engaged noted performers such as Mikhail Baryshnikov, Claire Bloom, Margot Fonteyn, Liza Minnelli, Rudolf Nureyev, Maya Plisetskaya, and Kathleen Turner. Her groundbreaking techniques and unmistakable style have earned the Company acclaim from audiences in more than 50 countries throughout North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

Today, the Company continues to foster Graham's spirit of ingenuity. It is embracing a new programming vision that showcases masterpieces by Graham, her contemporaries, and their successors alongside newly commissioned works by contemporary artists inspired by Graham's legacy. With programs that unite the work of choreographers across time within a rich historical and thematic narrative, the Company is actively working to create new platforms for contemporary dance and multiple points of access for audiences.

Martha Graham Dance Company's repertory includes Graham masterpieces Appalachian Spring, Lamentation, Cave of the Heart, Deaths and Entrances, and Chronicle, among other works. The Company continues to expand its mission to present the work of its founder and her contemporaries, and remains a leader by catalyzing new works with commissions that bring fresh perspectives to dance classics, such as "American Document" (2010) and "Lamentation Variations" (2009). Multimedia programs like "Dance is a Weapon" (2010), a montage of several works connected through text and media, redefine the boundaries of contemporary dance composition.

7/22/2015 7/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Organ - 7/12 (5pm, Chapel)

Location: Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 4:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Organ - 7/19 (5pm, Chapel)

Location: Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 4:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Organ - 7/26 (5pm, Chapel)

Location: Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 4:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Shakespeare's "As You Like It" (7/10 - 8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

SHAKESPEARE'S “As You Like It”
One of Shakespeare's most popular comedies, "As You Like It" joyously celebrates the transformation of self that occurs on the uncertain road of life. Banished from her home by her usurping uncle, Rosalind ventures into the Forest of Arden to discover her true love amidst a wide array of some of Shakespeare's most memorable characters. The gender-bending courtship of Rosalind and Orlando has enchanted audiences for centuries, as has the melancholy Jaques with his fascinating insights into the human condition. Featuring original music composed by Courtney Kaiser-Sandler, this timeless comedy highlights the liberating journey of self discovery while reminding us that "all the world's a stage."

7/10/2015 7/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Shakespeare's "As You Like It" (7/11 - 8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

SHAKESPEARE'S “As You Like It”
One of Shakespeare's most popular comedies, "As You Like It" joyously celebrates the transformation of self that occurs on the uncertain road of life. Banished from her home by her usurping uncle, Rosalind ventures into the Forest of Arden to discover her true love amidst a wide array of some of Shakespeare's most memorable characters. The gender-bending courtship of Rosalind and Orlando has enchanted audiences for centuries, as has the melancholy Jaques with his fascinating insights into the human condition. Featuring original music composed by Courtney Kaiser-Sandler, this timeless comedy highlights the liberating journey of self discovery while reminding us that "all the world's a stage."

7/11/2015 7/11/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Shakespeare's "As You Like It" (7/9 - 8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

SHAKESPEARE'S “As You Like It”
One of Shakespeare's most popular comedies, "As You Like It" joyously celebrates the transformation of self that occurs on the uncertain road of life. Banished from her home by her usurping uncle, Rosalind ventures into the Forest of Arden to discover her true love amidst a wide array of some of Shakespeare's most memorable characters. The gender-bending courtship of Rosalind and Orlando has enchanted audiences for centuries, as has the melancholy Jaques with his fascinating insights into the human condition. Featuring original music composed by Courtney Kaiser-Sandler, this timeless comedy highlights the liberating journey of self discovery while reminding us that "all the world's a stage."

7/9/2015 7/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Singer-Songwriter - 7/23 (8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

7/23/2015 7/23/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Singer-Songwriter - 7/24 (8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

7/24/2015 7/24/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Sweet Harmony Soul (7pm, CORSON) - USHER

Location: CORSON Auditorium -- PLEASE NOTE THIS HAS BEEN CHANGED FROM KRESGE.

Please arrive at CORSON Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

SWEET HARMONY SOUL: MAVIS STAPLES & PATTY GRIFFIN with AMY HELM AND THE HANDSOME STRANGERS
Grammy Award-Winner Patty Griffin and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Mavis Staples, two of music's most beloved singers, team up for one night of powerful music. They are joined by special guests Amy Helm & the Handsome Strangers.

Mavis Staples
How many musicians can claim this: to exist outside any scene, outside genre, yet weaving themselves into the fabric of soul, R&B, jazz, gospel, rock and blues? Many of the maverick names that come to mind are composers as well; that Mavis has created her legacy as an interpreter of others – an underestimated talent since the days of the band singers – makes her achievement all the more impressive.

She gives voice to others; more than that, she gives voice to entire movements, to eras, to songs so old their roots are lost. And she manages to work a little P-Funk in there too.

Recently, recognition of Mavis' unique role in American music has been growing beyond her longtime fans, dipping into the wider world of pop as she performs alongside Justin Timberlake at the White House tribute to Memphis Soul, or with Elton John in a show-stealing Grammy tribute to Levon Helm of the Band.

Her first album with Wilco leader Jeff Tweedy at the controls, You Are Not Alone, won a much deserved Grammy. Now, on her second collaboration with Tweedy – Mavis calls him "Tweedy" all day long, and they are a pleasure to watch in the studio, riffing like some old vaudeville team – she has made an album to match her new national profile. One True Vine is an album that will both surprise longtime fans and solidify her position at the helm of American music.

On their second collaboration, legendary singer Mavis Staples and Tweedy have crafted a gospel album for the 21st century, a music that strives for faith in a world where nothing can be taken for granted. On One True Vine, Mavis Staples gives voice to something new in her repertoire, something deeper and more resonant with our times; longtime fans will notice a new reserve in her singing, a muted, plaintive quality that serves the darker, more nuanced songs collected here perfectly.

If her Stax hits spoke for a growing black social consciousness, and her seventies collaborations with the Band and others gave spiritual weight to the rediscovery of traditional American music, then in our post-millennial drift, Jeff Tweedy has crafted a pulpit from which Mavis lends her voice to a search for grace.

One True Vine is a dark night of the soul, a journey from a search for faith to glorious belief. Starting with Alan Sparhawk from Low's downtempo "One Holy Ghost" – a song that feels the presence of God without fully comprehending it – and moving through the Jeff Tweedy original "Jesus Wept," a questioning of the darkness in the world, the album begins in the depths.

Even the perfectly chosen Funkadelic classic "Can You Get to That?," a high-flying respite in an otherwise subdued first half, is built around a question of the spirit. Then at mid-point, Nick Lowe's "Far Celestial Shores" picks up the pace, and the album opens up like a parting of the clouds.

The tempo kicks in with a tent-revival throb, and even when things slow for a moment with the greasy funk reworking of the Staple's "I Like the Things About Me," it's a second half of light and redemption. Closing with the beautiful ballad "One True Vine," the third of the Tweedy originals, the album ends on a note of salvation, with Mavis cradling the lyric like a prodigal son.

No one should be surprised at this new Mavis Staples; for six decades she has been the solid rock of American music. Alongside the family group she is so identified with, the Staple Singers, Mavis has managed to transform herself as she goes, yet never alter.

From the delta-inflected gospel sound she helped create in the 1950s, to the engaged protest of the civil rights era, and then, amazingly, on pop radio in the Stax era with a series of soul anthems, from "I'll Take You There" to "Respect Yourself" - through all these Mavis carried on, her warm embrace of a voice the only constant.

Patty Griffin
American Kid, Patty Griffin's seventh album, is her first album of mainly new material since Children Running Through in 2007. In between, she made the Grammy Award-winning Downtown Church in 2010, her version of classic gospel, though it featured three original songs. She also became a member of Band of Joy, the group in which leader Robert Plant and his cohorts meld British and American folk, rock and spiritual music.

American Kid, much of which Griffin says "was written to honor my father," returns to typical Patty Griffin territory, which is to say that it features a group of remarkably powerful, personal and unpredictable songs arranged and performed in a style that doesn't entirely repeat anything she's done on her previous albums while drawing on all of them. Yet Griffin's catalog is among the most unified in modern popular music, because her singing is as unmistakable and inimitable as her songwriting.

Griffin has lived in Austin and recorded either in Austin and Nashville throughout her career - she released her first album, Living with Ghosts, in 1996 - but American Kid is her first album whose music sounds stylistically rooted in Americana. "It was recorded in Memphis," Griffin says, and adds with a quick laugh, "Part of the reason was the chance to get away from what I'd been doing." The key to that was working with North Mississippi Allstars guitarist Luther Dickinson and drummer Cody Dickinson. The Dickinsons had played acoustic sets opening for Band of Joy and Luther gave Patty lessons on mandolin. "With the Dickinsons, you're constantly seeing people who work to get away from what they're used to."

Craig Ross, responsible for the production of an earlier Griffin collection, Impossible Dream, co-produced American Kid with Griffin. Ross is perhaps best known for his guitar work with Lisa Germano as well as his own critically-acclaimed solo albums. Griffin said she chose Ross because of his ability, as she describes it, "to get the ghost out of the machine." Ross plays — usually guitar, but also bass, mandolin, baritone, omnichord and organ — on all but two tracks on the album; the cover of Lefty Frizell's "Mom and Dad's Waltz" and the showstopper "Irish Boy," is Griffin and her own piano playing.

The other prominent musical contributor, appearing on eight of the 12 tracks, is guitarist Doug Lancio, who has played on just about every Patty Griffin recording since Flaming Red, and produced some of them. Robert Plant sings on "Ohio," "Faithful Son" and "Highway Song."

The album's lyrical focal point is Patty's father, a high school science teacher who fought in World War II, lost his father young and his mother almost immediately after he returned from the war, lived for a time in a Trappist monastery, raised seven children, bought Patty Sgt. Pepper's for her birthday and changed her life. Patty's parents sing a duet on "The Impossible Dream" at the end of the track "Top of the World" from Impossible Dream. They are credited as "Mr. and Mrs. Griffin," no first names.

Mr. Griffin's impending death sparked the songs. But these aren't songs about death, even though American Kid features ample reference to mortality. "Go Wherever You Want to Go," which opens the album, was written "as I was getting ready to lose him. So it was really to honor him. Then a whole other story opened up—my father's story started telling me a bigger story," says Griffin, referring in particular to "Irish Boy," her voice and piano solo number that's the record's emotional apogee, written about her dad in his glory, a soldier just returned to home and everything and everyone he loves.

"Irish Boy" proved particularly difficult to record. Griffin recorded several versions without quite capturing what she was feeling. Given that the lyric is not merely about her father, but written from his own perspective as a young man, that's not surprising. But after every other track on American Kid was finished, she decided to give it a last try. That's where she found this version, which ranges through the emotional turmoil of secrets told and untold, to find, in its almost but not quite matter of fact final notes, some peace. It is one of the outstanding vocals of her career. And not until a few hours later, Craig Ross reminded her, did Griffin realize that she'd finally found the song's secret on St. Patrick's Day .

The cover of Lefty Frizzell's "Mom and Dad's Waltz" presents a nakedly sentimental loving youngest child, not Griffin's usual mode by any means. It's a rendition at least as moving as Frizzell's original 1951 hit, and the repetition of the song's last words - "I love them so" - is a startling big moment on an album full of impressive singing, even by Griffin's high standard.

But American Kid is thematic, not a concept album. "Faithful Son" might or might not be a picture of Patty's dad, but not the harrowing "Wild Old Dog," which considers that God might be a bull terrier abandoned in a field beside the interstate; "That Kind of Lonely," which Griffin describes as occurring at a "kind of warmed over party" where the singer "stops being a being kid and finally decides to grow up"; and "Not a Bad Man," the most powerful antiwar song she's written, is about a soldier whose disaster is unmistakably the product of a war far more contemporary than her father's.

There's not a predictable moment on American Kid, a point reemphasized by the finale, "Gonna Miss You When You're Gone." It's a combination of words and music, torch singing and bittersweet insight, a farewell to the father she loved and, perhaps, that world that's been outgrown along the way. It's a devastating combination of lyricism and intellect, passion and technique, a tightly controlled account of a broken heart. It's not that it outstrips the other songs and performances Griffin's created for American Kid. It's that it fulfills them.

"A committed life, that's what I would like to have," says Patty Griffin, comparing her own to that of James Baldwin, her favorite writer. Even if you share that affection, it's a surprising thought, simply because every moment on American Kid sounds like she's already there.

Amy Helm
Amy Helm's deep musical roots were enriched by a lifetime of exposure to the finest expressions of American musical tradition. Combined with her stunning vocal and other creative gifts, those roots have grown up to reveal a spellbinding artist who moves easily through a broad range of musical styles.

The daughter of music legend Levon Helm and singer/songwriter Libby Titus Fagen, Helm wields a powerful voice that can both stir and soothe, whether she is singing traditional gospel, blues standards or her own heartfelt compositions. She is a gifted musician on both mandolin and drums, and has clearly absorbed the lessons of the many other accomplished artists with whom she has shared stages, including Mavis Staples, Emmylou Harris, and Joan Osborne as well as other uniquely American performers like Dr. John and Hubert Sumlin.

A founding member of the roots band Ollabelle with whom she has recorded three CDs, Helm has also performed live with scores of notable musicians like Warren Haynes, The Wood Brothers, and Donald Fagen, and her distinctive voice can be heard on recordings by artists ranging from Mercury Rev to Marc Cohn.

Her lengthy resume is highlighted by many years of singing and playing alongside her father, with whom she conceived, launched and perfected the Midnight Rambles, intimate performances held since 2004 at his home and studio in Woodstock, N.Y. The musical chemistry, affectionate humor and family pride that Amy shared on stage with her father helped shape the Midnight Ramble as it evolved into a musical event that still attracts fans and musicians from around the world. She co-produced Levon Helm's 2007 CD Dirt Farmer, which won the Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album, and she is prominently featured on the Levon Helm Band's Electric Dirt and Ramble at the Ryman Grammy-winning albums.

Helm continues to perform with the Ollabelle, the Midnight Ramble Band and the Dirt Farmer Band. She is poised to release her first solo album in 2015.

7/8/2015 7/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Beach Boys (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

THE BEACH BOYS
The legendary Beach Boys return for a night of "Fun Fun Fun," reliving hits like "Surfin' Safari" and "California Girls." The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band.

You can capsulize most pop music acts by reciting how many hits they've had and how many millions of albums they've sold. But these conventional measurements fall short when you're assessing the impact of The Beach Boys. To be sure, this band has birthed a torrent of hit singles and sold albums by the tens of millions. But its greater significance lies in the fact that it changed the musical landscape so profoundly that every pop act since has been in its debt.

Happily for us all, The Beach Boys continue to create and perform with the same bold imagination and style that marked their explosive debut over 50 years ago. And now in 2013, their Capitol Records release, Sounds of Summer (RIAA certified triple platinum with over three million in sales and climbing), and it's companion The Warmth of the Sun marks a resurgence in Beach Boys interest that has again rocked the world.

Even more than the Beatles, The Beach Boys found through their music the key to unfading youth—and they made copies for everyone. To these guys, the beach isn't just a place where the surf comes to play—it's where life is renewed and made whole again.

Captained by Mike Love, The Beach Boys play an astoundingly busy schedule of concerts, averaging 150 shows a year, ranging from sundrenched summer festivals to gala New Year's celebrations and special events worldwide. In 1974 Mike Love's concept album Endless Summer ignited a second generation of Beach Boys fans and stirred a tempest that rocked the music world.

 Grammy-winning songwriter Bruce Johnston, [Barry Manilow's "I Write the Songs"], joined The Beach Boys in 1965, replacing Glenn Campbell, who filled-in for Brian Wilson, on vocals/bass, when he retired from touring. Highly regarded as a singer-songwriter, Johnston's vocal work with such legendary artists as Elton John and Pink Floyd firmly established him among rock's elite artists.

Had this remarkable band been less committed to its art and its fans, it could have retired from the field with honor at dozens of points along the way, confident that it had made a lasting contribution to world culture. It could have rested on the success of the epoch-shifting Pet Sounds masterpiece in 1966 . . . or after recording Love's co-written Golden Globe nominated "Kokomo" in 1988 and seeing it become its best selling single ever . . . or after being inducted that same year into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame . . . or after watching its worldwide album sales blow past l00 million . . . or after winning the NARAS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001 [along with The Who, Bob Marley, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr. and Les Paul].

And still, The Beach Boys continue to have fun, fun, fun, with no end in sight. In 2012, The Beach Boys scheduled a 74 concert date limited 50th tour and ended in the U.S. July 15 and internationally on Sept 28th members reunited and released "That's Why God Made the Radio," the album debuted at # 3 on the Billboard charts, their highest chart position in 37 years and an unprecedented milestone.

The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band. This tour will not feature Brian Wilson, Al Jardine or David Marks.

Few, if any, acts can match The Beach Boys' concert presence, spirit and performance. They were center-stage at Live Aid, multiple Farm Aids, the Statue of Liberty's 100th alone—July 4, 1985—they played to nearly 2 million fans at shows in Philadelphia and Washington, D. C.

Love's role as the band's front man sometimes overshadows his stature as one of rock's foremost songwriters. "Surfin'," The Beach Boys' first hit came from his pen.

With his cousin, Brian Wilson, Love wrote the classics "Fun, Fun, Fun," "I Get Around," "Help Me Rhonda," "California Girls" and the Grammy nominated "Good Vibrations." Years later, he showed he still had the lyrical chops by co-writing the irresistible and chart-topping "Kokomo."

On The Beach Boys' near horizon is another national/world tour and continued charity activities through Mike Love's Love Foundation, which supports national environmental and educational initiatives. Love and The Beach Boys' recent efforts raised over a quarter of a million dollars for the Red Cross to benefit victims of Hurricane Katrina and made additional contributions to the disaster relief in Haiti.

The band appeared on countless worldwide TV shows throughout the years including: The Ed Sullivan Show, Dick Clark's American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. Other television appearances include performances on Don Imus' MSNBC show Imus In The Morning, TNT's NBA All-Star Game, NBC's Macy's Day Parade, The Today Show, PBS' A Capitol Fourth, Good Morning America, Weekend Today, The O'Reilly Factor.

In addition to founding Beach Boy Mike Love (lead vocals) and Beach Boy-
vet Bruce Johnston (vocals/keyboards)—Jeffery Foskett (guitar/vocals), Randell Kirsch (bass/vocals), Tim Bonhomme (keyboards/vocals), John Cowsill of The Cowsills (percussion /vocals) and Scott Totten (guitar/vocals) round out the band.

7/30/2015 7/30/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Beach Boys (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

THE BEACH BOYS
The legendary Beach Boys return for a night of "Fun Fun Fun," reliving hits like "Surfin' Safari" and "California Girls." The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band.

You can capsulize most pop music acts by reciting how many hits they've had and how many millions of albums they've sold. But these conventional measurements fall short when you're assessing the impact of The Beach Boys. To be sure, this band has birthed a torrent of hit singles and sold albums by the tens of millions. But its greater significance lies in the fact that it changed the musical landscape so profoundly that every pop act since has been in its debt.

Happily for us all, The Beach Boys continue to create and perform with the same bold imagination and style that marked their explosive debut over 50 years ago. And now in 2013, their Capitol Records release, Sounds of Summer (RIAA certified triple platinum with over three million in sales and climbing), and it's companion The Warmth of the Sun marks a resurgence in Beach Boys interest that has again rocked the world.

Even more than the Beatles, The Beach Boys found through their music the key to unfading youth—and they made copies for everyone. To these guys, the beach isn't just a place where the surf comes to play—it's where life is renewed and made whole again.

Captained by Mike Love, The Beach Boys play an astoundingly busy schedule of concerts, averaging 150 shows a year, ranging from sundrenched summer festivals to gala New Year's celebrations and special events worldwide. In 1974 Mike Love's concept album Endless Summer ignited a second generation of Beach Boys fans and stirred a tempest that rocked the music world.

 Grammy-winning songwriter Bruce Johnston, [Barry Manilow's "I Write the Songs"], joined The Beach Boys in 1965, replacing Glenn Campbell, who filled-in for Brian Wilson, on vocals/bass, when he retired from touring. Highly regarded as a singer-songwriter, Johnston's vocal work with such legendary artists as Elton John and Pink Floyd firmly established him among rock's elite artists.

Had this remarkable band been less committed to its art and its fans, it could have retired from the field with honor at dozens of points along the way, confident that it had made a lasting contribution to world culture. It could have rested on the success of the epoch-shifting Pet Sounds masterpiece in 1966 . . . or after recording Love's co-written Golden Globe nominated "Kokomo" in 1988 and seeing it become its best selling single ever . . . or after being inducted that same year into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame . . . or after watching its worldwide album sales blow past l00 million . . . or after winning the NARAS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001 [along with The Who, Bob Marley, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr. and Les Paul].

And still, The Beach Boys continue to have fun, fun, fun, with no end in sight. In 2012, The Beach Boys scheduled a 74 concert date limited 50th tour and ended in the U.S. July 15 and internationally on Sept 28th members reunited and released "That's Why God Made the Radio," the album debuted at # 3 on the Billboard charts, their highest chart position in 37 years and an unprecedented milestone.

The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band. This tour will not feature Brian Wilson, Al Jardine or David Marks.

Few, if any, acts can match The Beach Boys' concert presence, spirit and performance. They were center-stage at Live Aid, multiple Farm Aids, the Statue of Liberty's 100th alone—July 4, 1985—they played to nearly 2 million fans at shows in Philadelphia and Washington, D. C.

Love's role as the band's front man sometimes overshadows his stature as one of rock's foremost songwriters. "Surfin'," The Beach Boys' first hit came from his pen.

With his cousin, Brian Wilson, Love wrote the classics "Fun, Fun, Fun," "I Get Around," "Help Me Rhonda," "California Girls" and the Grammy nominated "Good Vibrations." Years later, he showed he still had the lyrical chops by co-writing the irresistible and chart-topping "Kokomo."

On The Beach Boys' near horizon is another national/world tour and continued charity activities through Mike Love's Love Foundation, which supports national environmental and educational initiatives. Love and The Beach Boys' recent efforts raised over a quarter of a million dollars for the Red Cross to benefit victims of Hurricane Katrina and made additional contributions to the disaster relief in Haiti.

The band appeared on countless worldwide TV shows throughout the years including: The Ed Sullivan Show, Dick Clark's American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. Other television appearances include performances on Don Imus' MSNBC show Imus In The Morning, TNT's NBA All-Star Game, NBC's Macy's Day Parade, The Today Show, PBS' A Capitol Fourth, Good Morning America, Weekend Today, The O'Reilly Factor.

In addition to founding Beach Boy Mike Love (lead vocals) and Beach Boy-
vet Bruce Johnston (vocals/keyboards)—Jeffery Foskett (guitar/vocals), Randell Kirsch (bass/vocals), Tim Bonhomme (keyboards/vocals), John Cowsill of The Cowsills (percussion /vocals) and Scott Totten (guitar/vocals) round out the band.

7/30/2015 7/30/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Beach Boys (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

THE BEACH BOYS
The legendary Beach Boys return for a night of "Fun Fun Fun," reliving hits like "Surfin' Safari" and "California Girls." The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band.

You can capsulize most pop music acts by reciting how many hits they've had and how many millions of albums they've sold. But these conventional measurements fall short when you're assessing the impact of The Beach Boys. To be sure, this band has birthed a torrent of hit singles and sold albums by the tens of millions. But its greater significance lies in the fact that it changed the musical landscape so profoundly that every pop act since has been in its debt.

Happily for us all, The Beach Boys continue to create and perform with the same bold imagination and style that marked their explosive debut over 50 years ago. And now in 2013, their Capitol Records release, Sounds of Summer (RIAA certified triple platinum with over three million in sales and climbing), and it's companion The Warmth of the Sun marks a resurgence in Beach Boys interest that has again rocked the world.

Even more than the Beatles, The Beach Boys found through their music the key to unfading youth—and they made copies for everyone. To these guys, the beach isn't just a place where the surf comes to play—it's where life is renewed and made whole again.

Captained by Mike Love, The Beach Boys play an astoundingly busy schedule of concerts, averaging 150 shows a year, ranging from sundrenched summer festivals to gala New Year's celebrations and special events worldwide. In 1974 Mike Love's concept album Endless Summer ignited a second generation of Beach Boys fans and stirred a tempest that rocked the music world.

 Grammy-winning songwriter Bruce Johnston, [Barry Manilow's "I Write the Songs"], joined The Beach Boys in 1965, replacing Glenn Campbell, who filled-in for Brian Wilson, on vocals/bass, when he retired from touring. Highly regarded as a singer-songwriter, Johnston's vocal work with such legendary artists as Elton John and Pink Floyd firmly established him among rock's elite artists.

Had this remarkable band been less committed to its art and its fans, it could have retired from the field with honor at dozens of points along the way, confident that it had made a lasting contribution to world culture. It could have rested on the success of the epoch-shifting Pet Sounds masterpiece in 1966 . . . or after recording Love's co-written Golden Globe nominated "Kokomo" in 1988 and seeing it become its best selling single ever . . . or after being inducted that same year into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame . . . or after watching its worldwide album sales blow past l00 million . . . or after winning the NARAS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001 [along with The Who, Bob Marley, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr. and Les Paul].

And still, The Beach Boys continue to have fun, fun, fun, with no end in sight. In 2012, The Beach Boys scheduled a 74 concert date limited 50th tour and ended in the U.S. July 15 and internationally on Sept 28th members reunited and released "That's Why God Made the Radio," the album debuted at # 3 on the Billboard charts, their highest chart position in 37 years and an unprecedented milestone.

The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band. This tour will not feature Brian Wilson, Al Jardine or David Marks.

Few, if any, acts can match The Beach Boys' concert presence, spirit and performance. They were center-stage at Live Aid, multiple Farm Aids, the Statue of Liberty's 100th alone—July 4, 1985—they played to nearly 2 million fans at shows in Philadelphia and Washington, D. C.

Love's role as the band's front man sometimes overshadows his stature as one of rock's foremost songwriters. "Surfin'," The Beach Boys' first hit came from his pen.

With his cousin, Brian Wilson, Love wrote the classics "Fun, Fun, Fun," "I Get Around," "Help Me Rhonda," "California Girls" and the Grammy nominated "Good Vibrations." Years later, he showed he still had the lyrical chops by co-writing the irresistible and chart-topping "Kokomo."

On The Beach Boys' near horizon is another national/world tour and continued charity activities through Mike Love's Love Foundation, which supports national environmental and educational initiatives. Love and The Beach Boys' recent efforts raised over a quarter of a million dollars for the Red Cross to benefit victims of Hurricane Katrina and made additional contributions to the disaster relief in Haiti.

The band appeared on countless worldwide TV shows throughout the years including: The Ed Sullivan Show, Dick Clark's American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. Other television appearances include performances on Don Imus' MSNBC show Imus In The Morning, TNT's NBA All-Star Game, NBC's Macy's Day Parade, The Today Show, PBS' A Capitol Fourth, Good Morning America, Weekend Today, The O'Reilly Factor.

In addition to founding Beach Boy Mike Love (lead vocals) and Beach Boy-
vet Bruce Johnston (vocals/keyboards)—Jeffery Foskett (guitar/vocals), Randell Kirsch (bass/vocals), Tim Bonhomme (keyboards/vocals), John Cowsill of The Cowsills (percussion /vocals) and Scott Totten (guitar/vocals) round out the band.

7/30/2015 7/30/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Beach Boys (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

THE BEACH BOYS
The legendary Beach Boys return for a night of "Fun Fun Fun," reliving hits like "Surfin' Safari" and "California Girls." The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band.

You can capsulize most pop music acts by reciting how many hits they've had and how many millions of albums they've sold. But these conventional measurements fall short when you're assessing the impact of The Beach Boys. To be sure, this band has birthed a torrent of hit singles and sold albums by the tens of millions. But its greater significance lies in the fact that it changed the musical landscape so profoundly that every pop act since has been in its debt.

Happily for us all, The Beach Boys continue to create and perform with the same bold imagination and style that marked their explosive debut over 50 years ago. And now in 2013, their Capitol Records release, Sounds of Summer (RIAA certified triple platinum with over three million in sales and climbing), and it's companion The Warmth of the Sun marks a resurgence in Beach Boys interest that has again rocked the world.

Even more than the Beatles, The Beach Boys found through their music the key to unfading youth—and they made copies for everyone. To these guys, the beach isn't just a place where the surf comes to play—it's where life is renewed and made whole again.

Captained by Mike Love, The Beach Boys play an astoundingly busy schedule of concerts, averaging 150 shows a year, ranging from sundrenched summer festivals to gala New Year's celebrations and special events worldwide. In 1974 Mike Love's concept album Endless Summer ignited a second generation of Beach Boys fans and stirred a tempest that rocked the music world.

 Grammy-winning songwriter Bruce Johnston, [Barry Manilow's "I Write the Songs"], joined The Beach Boys in 1965, replacing Glenn Campbell, who filled-in for Brian Wilson, on vocals/bass, when he retired from touring. Highly regarded as a singer-songwriter, Johnston's vocal work with such legendary artists as Elton John and Pink Floyd firmly established him among rock's elite artists.

Had this remarkable band been less committed to its art and its fans, it could have retired from the field with honor at dozens of points along the way, confident that it had made a lasting contribution to world culture. It could have rested on the success of the epoch-shifting Pet Sounds masterpiece in 1966 . . . or after recording Love's co-written Golden Globe nominated "Kokomo" in 1988 and seeing it become its best selling single ever . . . or after being inducted that same year into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame . . . or after watching its worldwide album sales blow past l00 million . . . or after winning the NARAS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001 [along with The Who, Bob Marley, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr. and Les Paul].

And still, The Beach Boys continue to have fun, fun, fun, with no end in sight. In 2012, The Beach Boys scheduled a 74 concert date limited 50th tour and ended in the U.S. July 15 and internationally on Sept 28th members reunited and released "That's Why God Made the Radio," the album debuted at # 3 on the Billboard charts, their highest chart position in 37 years and an unprecedented milestone.

The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band. This tour will not feature Brian Wilson, Al Jardine or David Marks.

Few, if any, acts can match The Beach Boys' concert presence, spirit and performance. They were center-stage at Live Aid, multiple Farm Aids, the Statue of Liberty's 100th alone—July 4, 1985—they played to nearly 2 million fans at shows in Philadelphia and Washington, D. C.

Love's role as the band's front man sometimes overshadows his stature as one of rock's foremost songwriters. "Surfin'," The Beach Boys' first hit came from his pen.

With his cousin, Brian Wilson, Love wrote the classics "Fun, Fun, Fun," "I Get Around," "Help Me Rhonda," "California Girls" and the Grammy nominated "Good Vibrations." Years later, he showed he still had the lyrical chops by co-writing the irresistible and chart-topping "Kokomo."

On The Beach Boys' near horizon is another national/world tour and continued charity activities through Mike Love's Love Foundation, which supports national environmental and educational initiatives. Love and The Beach Boys' recent efforts raised over a quarter of a million dollars for the Red Cross to benefit victims of Hurricane Katrina and made additional contributions to the disaster relief in Haiti.

The band appeared on countless worldwide TV shows throughout the years including: The Ed Sullivan Show, Dick Clark's American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. Other television appearances include performances on Don Imus' MSNBC show Imus In The Morning, TNT's NBA All-Star Game, NBC's Macy's Day Parade, The Today Show, PBS' A Capitol Fourth, Good Morning America, Weekend Today, The O'Reilly Factor.

In addition to founding Beach Boy Mike Love (lead vocals) and Beach Boy-
vet Bruce Johnston (vocals/keyboards)—Jeffery Foskett (guitar/vocals), Randell Kirsch (bass/vocals), Tim Bonhomme (keyboards/vocals), John Cowsill of The Cowsills (percussion /vocals) and Scott Totten (guitar/vocals) round out the band.

7/30/2015 7/30/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Beach Boys (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

THE BEACH BOYS
The legendary Beach Boys return for a night of "Fun Fun Fun," reliving hits like "Surfin' Safari" and "California Girls." The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band.

You can capsulize most pop music acts by reciting how many hits they've had and how many millions of albums they've sold. But these conventional measurements fall short when you're assessing the impact of The Beach Boys. To be sure, this band has birthed a torrent of hit singles and sold albums by the tens of millions. But its greater significance lies in the fact that it changed the musical landscape so profoundly that every pop act since has been in its debt.

Happily for us all, The Beach Boys continue to create and perform with the same bold imagination and style that marked their explosive debut over 50 years ago. And now in 2013, their Capitol Records release, Sounds of Summer (RIAA certified triple platinum with over three million in sales and climbing), and it's companion The Warmth of the Sun marks a resurgence in Beach Boys interest that has again rocked the world.

Even more than the Beatles, The Beach Boys found through their music the key to unfading youth—and they made copies for everyone. To these guys, the beach isn't just a place where the surf comes to play—it's where life is renewed and made whole again.

Captained by Mike Love, The Beach Boys play an astoundingly busy schedule of concerts, averaging 150 shows a year, ranging from sundrenched summer festivals to gala New Year's celebrations and special events worldwide. In 1974 Mike Love's concept album Endless Summer ignited a second generation of Beach Boys fans and stirred a tempest that rocked the music world.

 Grammy-winning songwriter Bruce Johnston, [Barry Manilow's "I Write the Songs"], joined The Beach Boys in 1965, replacing Glenn Campbell, who filled-in for Brian Wilson, on vocals/bass, when he retired from touring. Highly regarded as a singer-songwriter, Johnston's vocal work with such legendary artists as Elton John and Pink Floyd firmly established him among rock's elite artists.

Had this remarkable band been less committed to its art and its fans, it could have retired from the field with honor at dozens of points along the way, confident that it had made a lasting contribution to world culture. It could have rested on the success of the epoch-shifting Pet Sounds masterpiece in 1966 . . . or after recording Love's co-written Golden Globe nominated "Kokomo" in 1988 and seeing it become its best selling single ever . . . or after being inducted that same year into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame . . . or after watching its worldwide album sales blow past l00 million . . . or after winning the NARAS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001 [along with The Who, Bob Marley, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr. and Les Paul].

And still, The Beach Boys continue to have fun, fun, fun, with no end in sight. In 2012, The Beach Boys scheduled a 74 concert date limited 50th tour and ended in the U.S. July 15 and internationally on Sept 28th members reunited and released "That's Why God Made the Radio," the album debuted at # 3 on the Billboard charts, their highest chart position in 37 years and an unprecedented milestone.

The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band. This tour will not feature Brian Wilson, Al Jardine or David Marks.

Few, if any, acts can match The Beach Boys' concert presence, spirit and performance. They were center-stage at Live Aid, multiple Farm Aids, the Statue of Liberty's 100th alone—July 4, 1985—they played to nearly 2 million fans at shows in Philadelphia and Washington, D. C.

Love's role as the band's front man sometimes overshadows his stature as one of rock's foremost songwriters. "Surfin'," The Beach Boys' first hit came from his pen.

With his cousin, Brian Wilson, Love wrote the classics "Fun, Fun, Fun," "I Get Around," "Help Me Rhonda," "California Girls" and the Grammy nominated "Good Vibrations." Years later, he showed he still had the lyrical chops by co-writing the irresistible and chart-topping "Kokomo."

On The Beach Boys' near horizon is another national/world tour and continued charity activities through Mike Love's Love Foundation, which supports national environmental and educational initiatives. Love and The Beach Boys' recent efforts raised over a quarter of a million dollars for the Red Cross to benefit victims of Hurricane Katrina and made additional contributions to the disaster relief in Haiti.

The band appeared on countless worldwide TV shows throughout the years including: The Ed Sullivan Show, Dick Clark's American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. Other television appearances include performances on Don Imus' MSNBC show Imus In The Morning, TNT's NBA All-Star Game, NBC's Macy's Day Parade, The Today Show, PBS' A Capitol Fourth, Good Morning America, Weekend Today, The O'Reilly Factor.

In addition to founding Beach Boy Mike Love (lead vocals) and Beach Boy-
vet Bruce Johnston (vocals/keyboards)—Jeffery Foskett (guitar/vocals), Randell Kirsch (bass/vocals), Tim Bonhomme (keyboards/vocals), John Cowsill of The Cowsills (percussion /vocals) and Scott Totten (guitar/vocals) round out the band.

7/30/2015 7/30/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Beach Boys (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

THE BEACH BOYS
The legendary Beach Boys return for a night of "Fun Fun Fun," reliving hits like "Surfin' Safari" and "California Girls." The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band.

You can capsulize most pop music acts by reciting how many hits they've had and how many millions of albums they've sold. But these conventional measurements fall short when you're assessing the impact of The Beach Boys. To be sure, this band has birthed a torrent of hit singles and sold albums by the tens of millions. But its greater significance lies in the fact that it changed the musical landscape so profoundly that every pop act since has been in its debt.

Happily for us all, The Beach Boys continue to create and perform with the same bold imagination and style that marked their explosive debut over 50 years ago. And now in 2013, their Capitol Records release, Sounds of Summer (RIAA certified triple platinum with over three million in sales and climbing), and it's companion The Warmth of the Sun marks a resurgence in Beach Boys interest that has again rocked the world.

Even more than the Beatles, The Beach Boys found through their music the key to unfading youth—and they made copies for everyone. To these guys, the beach isn't just a place where the surf comes to play—it's where life is renewed and made whole again.

Captained by Mike Love, The Beach Boys play an astoundingly busy schedule of concerts, averaging 150 shows a year, ranging from sundrenched summer festivals to gala New Year's celebrations and special events worldwide. In 1974 Mike Love's concept album Endless Summer ignited a second generation of Beach Boys fans and stirred a tempest that rocked the music world.

 Grammy-winning songwriter Bruce Johnston, [Barry Manilow's "I Write the Songs"], joined The Beach Boys in 1965, replacing Glenn Campbell, who filled-in for Brian Wilson, on vocals/bass, when he retired from touring. Highly regarded as a singer-songwriter, Johnston's vocal work with such legendary artists as Elton John and Pink Floyd firmly established him among rock's elite artists.

Had this remarkable band been less committed to its art and its fans, it could have retired from the field with honor at dozens of points along the way, confident that it had made a lasting contribution to world culture. It could have rested on the success of the epoch-shifting Pet Sounds masterpiece in 1966 . . . or after recording Love's co-written Golden Globe nominated "Kokomo" in 1988 and seeing it become its best selling single ever . . . or after being inducted that same year into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame . . . or after watching its worldwide album sales blow past l00 million . . . or after winning the NARAS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001 [along with The Who, Bob Marley, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr. and Les Paul].

And still, The Beach Boys continue to have fun, fun, fun, with no end in sight. In 2012, The Beach Boys scheduled a 74 concert date limited 50th tour and ended in the U.S. July 15 and internationally on Sept 28th members reunited and released "That's Why God Made the Radio," the album debuted at # 3 on the Billboard charts, their highest chart position in 37 years and an unprecedented milestone.

The Beach Boys are led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston, who along with Jeffery Foskett, Randell Kirsch, Tim Bonhomme, John Cowsill and Scott Totten continue the legacy of the iconic American band. This tour will not feature Brian Wilson, Al Jardine or David Marks.

Few, if any, acts can match The Beach Boys' concert presence, spirit and performance. They were center-stage at Live Aid, multiple Farm Aids, the Statue of Liberty's 100th alone—July 4, 1985—they played to nearly 2 million fans at shows in Philadelphia and Washington, D. C.

Love's role as the band's front man sometimes overshadows his stature as one of rock's foremost songwriters. "Surfin'," The Beach Boys' first hit came from his pen.

With his cousin, Brian Wilson, Love wrote the classics "Fun, Fun, Fun," "I Get Around," "Help Me Rhonda," "California Girls" and the Grammy nominated "Good Vibrations." Years later, he showed he still had the lyrical chops by co-writing the irresistible and chart-topping "Kokomo."

On The Beach Boys' near horizon is another national/world tour and continued charity activities through Mike Love's Love Foundation, which supports national environmental and educational initiatives. Love and The Beach Boys' recent efforts raised over a quarter of a million dollars for the Red Cross to benefit victims of Hurricane Katrina and made additional contributions to the disaster relief in Haiti.

The band appeared on countless worldwide TV shows throughout the years including: The Ed Sullivan Show, Dick Clark's American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. Other television appearances include performances on Don Imus' MSNBC show Imus In The Morning, TNT's NBA All-Star Game, NBC's Macy's Day Parade, The Today Show, PBS' A Capitol Fourth, Good Morning America, Weekend Today, The O'Reilly Factor.

In addition to founding Beach Boy Mike Love (lead vocals) and Beach Boy-
vet Bruce Johnston (vocals/keyboards)—Jeffery Foskett (guitar/vocals), Randell Kirsch (bass/vocals), Tim Bonhomme (keyboards/vocals), John Cowsill of The Cowsills (percussion /vocals) and Scott Totten (guitar/vocals) round out the band.

7/30/2015 7/30/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYHC w/IS, IVE & IC (8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

World Youth Honors Choir with Intermediate Vocal Ensemble and Intermediate Choir.

7/10/2015 7/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Andreas Delfs & James Ehnes (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with ANDREAS DELFS, CONDUCTOR & JAMES EHNES, VIOLIN
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes is widely considered one of the most dynamic and exciting performers in classical music. He has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors. His extensive discography of over 30 recordings has been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy®, a Gramophone, and seven Juno Awards.

James Ehnes will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Andreas Delfs on Sunday, July 19 at 8 p.m. to perform Barber's "Violin Concerto." Other repertoire for the evening will include Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra."

James Ehnes
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors.

In the 2014-2015 season James performs concerts with the Royal Philharmonic, Danish National, Melbourne, Sydney, NHK, Vienna, and Boston symphony orchestras, with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and recitals in Prague, London, Toronto, Fort Worth and Montreal. James also appears with the Ehnes Quartet across North America and will lead the winter and summer festivals of the Seattle Chamber Music Society, where he is the Artistic Director.

James Ehnes has an extensive discography of over 35 recordings featuring music ranging from J.S. Bach to John Adams. Recent projects include Khachaturian's Violin Concerto paired with Shostakovich's String Quartets Nos. 7&8, an American Chamber Music disc, a double CD of the complete violin works by Prokofiev, a disc featuring concertos by Britten and Shostakovich, four CDs of the music of Béla Bartók as well as a recording of Tchaikovsky's complete oeuvre for violin. Upcoming releases will include works by Franck, Strauss, Leclair, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Janácek, and Tartini. His recordings have been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy, a Gramophone, and nine Juno Awards.

James Ehnes was born in 1976 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. He began violin studies at the age of four, and at age nine became a protégé of the noted Canadian violinist Francis Chaplin. He studied with Sally Thomas at the Meadowmount School of Music and from 1993 to 1997 at The Juilliard School, winning the Peter Mennin Prize for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music upon his graduation. Mr. Ehnes first gained national recognition in 1987 as winner of the Grand Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Competition. The following year he won the First Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Festival, the youngest musician ever to do so. At age 13, he made his major orchestral solo debut with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

He has won numerous awards and prizes, including the first-ever Ivan Galamian Memorial Award, the Canada Council for the Arts' Virginia Parker Prize, and a 2005 Avery Fisher Career Grant. James has been honoured by Brandon University with a Doctor of Music degree (honoris causa) and in 2007 he became the youngest person ever elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of Canada. In 2010 the Governor General of Canada appointed James a Member of the Order of Canada, and in 2013 he was named an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music, limited to a select group of 300 living distinguished musicians.

James Ehnes plays the "Marsick" Stradivarius of 1715. He currently lives in Bradenton, Florida with his family.

Andreas Delfs
Andreas Delfs currently holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra where, during twelve seasons as Music Director, he was instrumental in the orchestra’s rise to national prominence. He has held chief artistic posts with several orchestras both in North America and Europe. He led the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra as Music Director (2001-2004) and artistic consultant (2004 -2006). He served as General Music Director of Hannover, Germany (1995-2000), conducting the symphony orchestra and opera company. Prior to his time in Hannover, Andreas Delfs was Music Director of the Bern Opera, resident conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony (during the tenure of Lorin Maazel) and Music Director, at an early age, of the Orchestre Suisse des Jeunes.

Born in Flensburg, Germany, Andreas Delfs began studying piano and music theory at age 5. He studied with Christoph von Dohnányi and Aldo Ceccato at the Hamburg Conservatory. At 20 Andreas Delfs became the youngest ever Music Director of the Hamburg University Orchestra and Musical Assistant at the Hamburg State Opera. Enrolling at The Juilliard School, Andreas Delfs studied with Jorge Mester and Sixten Ehrling and won the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship.

Andreas Delfs keeps an active guest conducting schedule. Recent highlights have included appearances with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, Calgary Philharmonic, Copenhagen Philharmonic, NCPA Orchestra China, Singapore Symphony, Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Staatsorchester Rheinische Philharmonie, National Symphony Orchestra Washington, and Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. He conducted the Britten Sinfonia in a performance ofElijah at London’s Barbican Hall as well as two new operatic productions, namely Turandot at Opera Lyra Ottawa and Carmen at Opera North.

Mr. Delfs has conducted numerous world premieres and has close links with many of today’s composers. He counts among his profound musical inspirations musicians such as John Corigliano, Philip Glass, Roberto Sierra and Hans Werner Henze. He is the frequent partner to many of the world’s most renowned solo artists, including Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yo Yo Ma and Renée Fleming.

Andreas Delfs’s more recent recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D with Susanne Hou and the London Symphony Orchestra, Robert Sierra’s Missa Latina with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra on the Naxos label and Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and pianist John O’Conor on the Telarc label. Other recording projects have included a collection of sacred songs with Renée Fleming for Decca, a production of Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for Avie, as well as a recording of Mozart’s Requiem, with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra.

Over the years Andreas Delfs has led numerous distinguished ensembles. He has conducted orchestras such as the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra.

Among Andreas Delfs’ most notable operatic achievements has been his highly praised debut with the New York City Opera conducting performances of Carmen and a production of the uncut version of Hans Werner Henze’s monumental König Hirsch for the Württemberg State Theatre in Stuttgart. He led four productions at the Aspen Music Festival and gave the Swiss premiere of György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre, which received special praise from the composer.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Andreas Delfs & James Ehnes (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with ANDREAS DELFS, CONDUCTOR & JAMES EHNES, VIOLIN
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes is widely considered one of the most dynamic and exciting performers in classical music. He has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors. His extensive discography of over 30 recordings has been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy®, a Gramophone, and seven Juno Awards.

James Ehnes will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Andreas Delfs on Sunday, July 19 at 8 p.m. to perform Barber's "Violin Concerto." Other repertoire for the evening will include Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra."

James Ehnes
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors.

In the 2014-2015 season James performs concerts with the Royal Philharmonic, Danish National, Melbourne, Sydney, NHK, Vienna, and Boston symphony orchestras, with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and recitals in Prague, London, Toronto, Fort Worth and Montreal. James also appears with the Ehnes Quartet across North America and will lead the winter and summer festivals of the Seattle Chamber Music Society, where he is the Artistic Director.

James Ehnes has an extensive discography of over 35 recordings featuring music ranging from J.S. Bach to John Adams. Recent projects include Khachaturian's Violin Concerto paired with Shostakovich's String Quartets Nos. 7&8, an American Chamber Music disc, a double CD of the complete violin works by Prokofiev, a disc featuring concertos by Britten and Shostakovich, four CDs of the music of Béla Bartók as well as a recording of Tchaikovsky's complete oeuvre for violin. Upcoming releases will include works by Franck, Strauss, Leclair, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Janácek, and Tartini. His recordings have been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy, a Gramophone, and nine Juno Awards.

James Ehnes was born in 1976 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. He began violin studies at the age of four, and at age nine became a protégé of the noted Canadian violinist Francis Chaplin. He studied with Sally Thomas at the Meadowmount School of Music and from 1993 to 1997 at The Juilliard School, winning the Peter Mennin Prize for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music upon his graduation. Mr. Ehnes first gained national recognition in 1987 as winner of the Grand Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Competition. The following year he won the First Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Festival, the youngest musician ever to do so. At age 13, he made his major orchestral solo debut with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

He has won numerous awards and prizes, including the first-ever Ivan Galamian Memorial Award, the Canada Council for the Arts' Virginia Parker Prize, and a 2005 Avery Fisher Career Grant. James has been honoured by Brandon University with a Doctor of Music degree (honoris causa) and in 2007 he became the youngest person ever elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of Canada. In 2010 the Governor General of Canada appointed James a Member of the Order of Canada, and in 2013 he was named an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music, limited to a select group of 300 living distinguished musicians.

James Ehnes plays the "Marsick" Stradivarius of 1715. He currently lives in Bradenton, Florida with his family.

Andreas Delfs
Andreas Delfs currently holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra where, during twelve seasons as Music Director, he was instrumental in the orchestra’s rise to national prominence. He has held chief artistic posts with several orchestras both in North America and Europe. He led the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra as Music Director (2001-2004) and artistic consultant (2004 -2006). He served as General Music Director of Hannover, Germany (1995-2000), conducting the symphony orchestra and opera company. Prior to his time in Hannover, Andreas Delfs was Music Director of the Bern Opera, resident conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony (during the tenure of Lorin Maazel) and Music Director, at an early age, of the Orchestre Suisse des Jeunes.

Born in Flensburg, Germany, Andreas Delfs began studying piano and music theory at age 5. He studied with Christoph von Dohnányi and Aldo Ceccato at the Hamburg Conservatory. At 20 Andreas Delfs became the youngest ever Music Director of the Hamburg University Orchestra and Musical Assistant at the Hamburg State Opera. Enrolling at The Juilliard School, Andreas Delfs studied with Jorge Mester and Sixten Ehrling and won the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship.

Andreas Delfs keeps an active guest conducting schedule. Recent highlights have included appearances with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, Calgary Philharmonic, Copenhagen Philharmonic, NCPA Orchestra China, Singapore Symphony, Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Staatsorchester Rheinische Philharmonie, National Symphony Orchestra Washington, and Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. He conducted the Britten Sinfonia in a performance ofElijah at London’s Barbican Hall as well as two new operatic productions, namely Turandot at Opera Lyra Ottawa and Carmen at Opera North.

Mr. Delfs has conducted numerous world premieres and has close links with many of today’s composers. He counts among his profound musical inspirations musicians such as John Corigliano, Philip Glass, Roberto Sierra and Hans Werner Henze. He is the frequent partner to many of the world’s most renowned solo artists, including Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yo Yo Ma and Renée Fleming.

Andreas Delfs’s more recent recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D with Susanne Hou and the London Symphony Orchestra, Robert Sierra’s Missa Latina with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra on the Naxos label and Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and pianist John O’Conor on the Telarc label. Other recording projects have included a collection of sacred songs with Renée Fleming for Decca, a production of Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for Avie, as well as a recording of Mozart’s Requiem, with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra.

Over the years Andreas Delfs has led numerous distinguished ensembles. He has conducted orchestras such as the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra.

Among Andreas Delfs’ most notable operatic achievements has been his highly praised debut with the New York City Opera conducting performances of Carmen and a production of the uncut version of Hans Werner Henze’s monumental König Hirsch for the Württemberg State Theatre in Stuttgart. He led four productions at the Aspen Music Festival and gave the Swiss premiere of György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre, which received special praise from the composer.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Andreas Delfs & James Ehnes (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with ANDREAS DELFS, CONDUCTOR & JAMES EHNES, VIOLIN
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes is widely considered one of the most dynamic and exciting performers in classical music. He has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors. His extensive discography of over 30 recordings has been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy®, a Gramophone, and seven Juno Awards.

James Ehnes will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Andreas Delfs on Sunday, July 19 at 8 p.m. to perform Barber's "Violin Concerto." Other repertoire for the evening will include Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra."

James Ehnes
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors.

In the 2014-2015 season James performs concerts with the Royal Philharmonic, Danish National, Melbourne, Sydney, NHK, Vienna, and Boston symphony orchestras, with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and recitals in Prague, London, Toronto, Fort Worth and Montreal. James also appears with the Ehnes Quartet across North America and will lead the winter and summer festivals of the Seattle Chamber Music Society, where he is the Artistic Director.

James Ehnes has an extensive discography of over 35 recordings featuring music ranging from J.S. Bach to John Adams. Recent projects include Khachaturian's Violin Concerto paired with Shostakovich's String Quartets Nos. 7&8, an American Chamber Music disc, a double CD of the complete violin works by Prokofiev, a disc featuring concertos by Britten and Shostakovich, four CDs of the music of Béla Bartók as well as a recording of Tchaikovsky's complete oeuvre for violin. Upcoming releases will include works by Franck, Strauss, Leclair, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Janácek, and Tartini. His recordings have been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy, a Gramophone, and nine Juno Awards.

James Ehnes was born in 1976 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. He began violin studies at the age of four, and at age nine became a protégé of the noted Canadian violinist Francis Chaplin. He studied with Sally Thomas at the Meadowmount School of Music and from 1993 to 1997 at The Juilliard School, winning the Peter Mennin Prize for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music upon his graduation. Mr. Ehnes first gained national recognition in 1987 as winner of the Grand Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Competition. The following year he won the First Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Festival, the youngest musician ever to do so. At age 13, he made his major orchestral solo debut with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

He has won numerous awards and prizes, including the first-ever Ivan Galamian Memorial Award, the Canada Council for the Arts' Virginia Parker Prize, and a 2005 Avery Fisher Career Grant. James has been honoured by Brandon University with a Doctor of Music degree (honoris causa) and in 2007 he became the youngest person ever elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of Canada. In 2010 the Governor General of Canada appointed James a Member of the Order of Canada, and in 2013 he was named an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music, limited to a select group of 300 living distinguished musicians.

James Ehnes plays the "Marsick" Stradivarius of 1715. He currently lives in Bradenton, Florida with his family.

Andreas Delfs
Andreas Delfs currently holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra where, during twelve seasons as Music Director, he was instrumental in the orchestra’s rise to national prominence. He has held chief artistic posts with several orchestras both in North America and Europe. He led the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra as Music Director (2001-2004) and artistic consultant (2004 -2006). He served as General Music Director of Hannover, Germany (1995-2000), conducting the symphony orchestra and opera company. Prior to his time in Hannover, Andreas Delfs was Music Director of the Bern Opera, resident conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony (during the tenure of Lorin Maazel) and Music Director, at an early age, of the Orchestre Suisse des Jeunes.

Born in Flensburg, Germany, Andreas Delfs began studying piano and music theory at age 5. He studied with Christoph von Dohnányi and Aldo Ceccato at the Hamburg Conservatory. At 20 Andreas Delfs became the youngest ever Music Director of the Hamburg University Orchestra and Musical Assistant at the Hamburg State Opera. Enrolling at The Juilliard School, Andreas Delfs studied with Jorge Mester and Sixten Ehrling and won the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship.

Andreas Delfs keeps an active guest conducting schedule. Recent highlights have included appearances with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, Calgary Philharmonic, Copenhagen Philharmonic, NCPA Orchestra China, Singapore Symphony, Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Staatsorchester Rheinische Philharmonie, National Symphony Orchestra Washington, and Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. He conducted the Britten Sinfonia in a performance ofElijah at London’s Barbican Hall as well as two new operatic productions, namely Turandot at Opera Lyra Ottawa and Carmen at Opera North.

Mr. Delfs has conducted numerous world premieres and has close links with many of today’s composers. He counts among his profound musical inspirations musicians such as John Corigliano, Philip Glass, Roberto Sierra and Hans Werner Henze. He is the frequent partner to many of the world’s most renowned solo artists, including Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yo Yo Ma and Renée Fleming.

Andreas Delfs’s more recent recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D with Susanne Hou and the London Symphony Orchestra, Robert Sierra’s Missa Latina with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra on the Naxos label and Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and pianist John O’Conor on the Telarc label. Other recording projects have included a collection of sacred songs with Renée Fleming for Decca, a production of Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for Avie, as well as a recording of Mozart’s Requiem, with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra.

Over the years Andreas Delfs has led numerous distinguished ensembles. He has conducted orchestras such as the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra.

Among Andreas Delfs’ most notable operatic achievements has been his highly praised debut with the New York City Opera conducting performances of Carmen and a production of the uncut version of Hans Werner Henze’s monumental König Hirsch for the Württemberg State Theatre in Stuttgart. He led four productions at the Aspen Music Festival and gave the Swiss premiere of György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre, which received special praise from the composer.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Andreas Delfs & James Ehnes (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with ANDREAS DELFS, CONDUCTOR & JAMES EHNES, VIOLIN
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes is widely considered one of the most dynamic and exciting performers in classical music. He has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors. His extensive discography of over 30 recordings has been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy®, a Gramophone, and seven Juno Awards.

James Ehnes will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Andreas Delfs on Sunday, July 19 at 8 p.m. to perform Barber's "Violin Concerto." Other repertoire for the evening will include Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra."

James Ehnes
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors.

In the 2014-2015 season James performs concerts with the Royal Philharmonic, Danish National, Melbourne, Sydney, NHK, Vienna, and Boston symphony orchestras, with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and recitals in Prague, London, Toronto, Fort Worth and Montreal. James also appears with the Ehnes Quartet across North America and will lead the winter and summer festivals of the Seattle Chamber Music Society, where he is the Artistic Director.

James Ehnes has an extensive discography of over 35 recordings featuring music ranging from J.S. Bach to John Adams. Recent projects include Khachaturian's Violin Concerto paired with Shostakovich's String Quartets Nos. 7&8, an American Chamber Music disc, a double CD of the complete violin works by Prokofiev, a disc featuring concertos by Britten and Shostakovich, four CDs of the music of Béla Bartók as well as a recording of Tchaikovsky's complete oeuvre for violin. Upcoming releases will include works by Franck, Strauss, Leclair, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Janácek, and Tartini. His recordings have been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy, a Gramophone, and nine Juno Awards.

James Ehnes was born in 1976 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. He began violin studies at the age of four, and at age nine became a protégé of the noted Canadian violinist Francis Chaplin. He studied with Sally Thomas at the Meadowmount School of Music and from 1993 to 1997 at The Juilliard School, winning the Peter Mennin Prize for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music upon his graduation. Mr. Ehnes first gained national recognition in 1987 as winner of the Grand Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Competition. The following year he won the First Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Festival, the youngest musician ever to do so. At age 13, he made his major orchestral solo debut with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

He has won numerous awards and prizes, including the first-ever Ivan Galamian Memorial Award, the Canada Council for the Arts' Virginia Parker Prize, and a 2005 Avery Fisher Career Grant. James has been honoured by Brandon University with a Doctor of Music degree (honoris causa) and in 2007 he became the youngest person ever elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of Canada. In 2010 the Governor General of Canada appointed James a Member of the Order of Canada, and in 2013 he was named an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music, limited to a select group of 300 living distinguished musicians.

James Ehnes plays the "Marsick" Stradivarius of 1715. He currently lives in Bradenton, Florida with his family.

Andreas Delfs
Andreas Delfs currently holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra where, during twelve seasons as Music Director, he was instrumental in the orchestra’s rise to national prominence. He has held chief artistic posts with several orchestras both in North America and Europe. He led the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra as Music Director (2001-2004) and artistic consultant (2004 -2006). He served as General Music Director of Hannover, Germany (1995-2000), conducting the symphony orchestra and opera company. Prior to his time in Hannover, Andreas Delfs was Music Director of the Bern Opera, resident conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony (during the tenure of Lorin Maazel) and Music Director, at an early age, of the Orchestre Suisse des Jeunes.

Born in Flensburg, Germany, Andreas Delfs began studying piano and music theory at age 5. He studied with Christoph von Dohnányi and Aldo Ceccato at the Hamburg Conservatory. At 20 Andreas Delfs became the youngest ever Music Director of the Hamburg University Orchestra and Musical Assistant at the Hamburg State Opera. Enrolling at The Juilliard School, Andreas Delfs studied with Jorge Mester and Sixten Ehrling and won the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship.

Andreas Delfs keeps an active guest conducting schedule. Recent highlights have included appearances with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, Calgary Philharmonic, Copenhagen Philharmonic, NCPA Orchestra China, Singapore Symphony, Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Staatsorchester Rheinische Philharmonie, National Symphony Orchestra Washington, and Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. He conducted the Britten Sinfonia in a performance ofElijah at London’s Barbican Hall as well as two new operatic productions, namely Turandot at Opera Lyra Ottawa and Carmen at Opera North.

Mr. Delfs has conducted numerous world premieres and has close links with many of today’s composers. He counts among his profound musical inspirations musicians such as John Corigliano, Philip Glass, Roberto Sierra and Hans Werner Henze. He is the frequent partner to many of the world’s most renowned solo artists, including Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yo Yo Ma and Renée Fleming.

Andreas Delfs’s more recent recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D with Susanne Hou and the London Symphony Orchestra, Robert Sierra’s Missa Latina with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra on the Naxos label and Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and pianist John O’Conor on the Telarc label. Other recording projects have included a collection of sacred songs with Renée Fleming for Decca, a production of Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for Avie, as well as a recording of Mozart’s Requiem, with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra.

Over the years Andreas Delfs has led numerous distinguished ensembles. He has conducted orchestras such as the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra.

Among Andreas Delfs’ most notable operatic achievements has been his highly praised debut with the New York City Opera conducting performances of Carmen and a production of the uncut version of Hans Werner Henze’s monumental König Hirsch for the Württemberg State Theatre in Stuttgart. He led four productions at the Aspen Music Festival and gave the Swiss premiere of György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre, which received special praise from the composer.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Andreas Delfs & James Ehnes (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with ANDREAS DELFS, CONDUCTOR & JAMES EHNES, VIOLIN
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes is widely considered one of the most dynamic and exciting performers in classical music. He has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors. His extensive discography of over 30 recordings has been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy®, a Gramophone, and seven Juno Awards.

James Ehnes will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Andreas Delfs on Sunday, July 19 at 8 p.m. to perform Barber's "Violin Concerto." Other repertoire for the evening will include Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra."

James Ehnes
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors.

In the 2014-2015 season James performs concerts with the Royal Philharmonic, Danish National, Melbourne, Sydney, NHK, Vienna, and Boston symphony orchestras, with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and recitals in Prague, London, Toronto, Fort Worth and Montreal. James also appears with the Ehnes Quartet across North America and will lead the winter and summer festivals of the Seattle Chamber Music Society, where he is the Artistic Director.

James Ehnes has an extensive discography of over 35 recordings featuring music ranging from J.S. Bach to John Adams. Recent projects include Khachaturian's Violin Concerto paired with Shostakovich's String Quartets Nos. 7&8, an American Chamber Music disc, a double CD of the complete violin works by Prokofiev, a disc featuring concertos by Britten and Shostakovich, four CDs of the music of Béla Bartók as well as a recording of Tchaikovsky's complete oeuvre for violin. Upcoming releases will include works by Franck, Strauss, Leclair, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Janácek, and Tartini. His recordings have been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy, a Gramophone, and nine Juno Awards.

James Ehnes was born in 1976 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. He began violin studies at the age of four, and at age nine became a protégé of the noted Canadian violinist Francis Chaplin. He studied with Sally Thomas at the Meadowmount School of Music and from 1993 to 1997 at The Juilliard School, winning the Peter Mennin Prize for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music upon his graduation. Mr. Ehnes first gained national recognition in 1987 as winner of the Grand Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Competition. The following year he won the First Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Festival, the youngest musician ever to do so. At age 13, he made his major orchestral solo debut with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

He has won numerous awards and prizes, including the first-ever Ivan Galamian Memorial Award, the Canada Council for the Arts' Virginia Parker Prize, and a 2005 Avery Fisher Career Grant. James has been honoured by Brandon University with a Doctor of Music degree (honoris causa) and in 2007 he became the youngest person ever elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of Canada. In 2010 the Governor General of Canada appointed James a Member of the Order of Canada, and in 2013 he was named an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music, limited to a select group of 300 living distinguished musicians.

James Ehnes plays the "Marsick" Stradivarius of 1715. He currently lives in Bradenton, Florida with his family.

Andreas Delfs
Andreas Delfs currently holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra where, during twelve seasons as Music Director, he was instrumental in the orchestra’s rise to national prominence. He has held chief artistic posts with several orchestras both in North America and Europe. He led the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra as Music Director (2001-2004) and artistic consultant (2004 -2006). He served as General Music Director of Hannover, Germany (1995-2000), conducting the symphony orchestra and opera company. Prior to his time in Hannover, Andreas Delfs was Music Director of the Bern Opera, resident conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony (during the tenure of Lorin Maazel) and Music Director, at an early age, of the Orchestre Suisse des Jeunes.

Born in Flensburg, Germany, Andreas Delfs began studying piano and music theory at age 5. He studied with Christoph von Dohnányi and Aldo Ceccato at the Hamburg Conservatory. At 20 Andreas Delfs became the youngest ever Music Director of the Hamburg University Orchestra and Musical Assistant at the Hamburg State Opera. Enrolling at The Juilliard School, Andreas Delfs studied with Jorge Mester and Sixten Ehrling and won the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship.

Andreas Delfs keeps an active guest conducting schedule. Recent highlights have included appearances with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, Calgary Philharmonic, Copenhagen Philharmonic, NCPA Orchestra China, Singapore Symphony, Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Staatsorchester Rheinische Philharmonie, National Symphony Orchestra Washington, and Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. He conducted the Britten Sinfonia in a performance ofElijah at London’s Barbican Hall as well as two new operatic productions, namely Turandot at Opera Lyra Ottawa and Carmen at Opera North.

Mr. Delfs has conducted numerous world premieres and has close links with many of today’s composers. He counts among his profound musical inspirations musicians such as John Corigliano, Philip Glass, Roberto Sierra and Hans Werner Henze. He is the frequent partner to many of the world’s most renowned solo artists, including Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yo Yo Ma and Renée Fleming.

Andreas Delfs’s more recent recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D with Susanne Hou and the London Symphony Orchestra, Robert Sierra’s Missa Latina with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra on the Naxos label and Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and pianist John O’Conor on the Telarc label. Other recording projects have included a collection of sacred songs with Renée Fleming for Decca, a production of Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for Avie, as well as a recording of Mozart’s Requiem, with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra.

Over the years Andreas Delfs has led numerous distinguished ensembles. He has conducted orchestras such as the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra.

Among Andreas Delfs’ most notable operatic achievements has been his highly praised debut with the New York City Opera conducting performances of Carmen and a production of the uncut version of Hans Werner Henze’s monumental König Hirsch for the Württemberg State Theatre in Stuttgart. He led four productions at the Aspen Music Festival and gave the Swiss premiere of György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre, which received special praise from the composer.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Andreas Delfs & James Ehnes (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with ANDREAS DELFS, CONDUCTOR & JAMES EHNES, VIOLIN
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes is widely considered one of the most dynamic and exciting performers in classical music. He has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors. His extensive discography of over 30 recordings has been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy®, a Gramophone, and seven Juno Awards.

James Ehnes will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Andreas Delfs on Sunday, July 19 at 8 p.m. to perform Barber's "Violin Concerto." Other repertoire for the evening will include Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra."

James Ehnes
Known for his virtuosity and probing musicianship, violinist James Ehnes has performed in over 30 countries on five continents, appearing regularly in the world's great concert halls and with many of the most celebrated orchestras and conductors.

In the 2014-2015 season James performs concerts with the Royal Philharmonic, Danish National, Melbourne, Sydney, NHK, Vienna, and Boston symphony orchestras, with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and recitals in Prague, London, Toronto, Fort Worth and Montreal. James also appears with the Ehnes Quartet across North America and will lead the winter and summer festivals of the Seattle Chamber Music Society, where he is the Artistic Director.

James Ehnes has an extensive discography of over 35 recordings featuring music ranging from J.S. Bach to John Adams. Recent projects include Khachaturian's Violin Concerto paired with Shostakovich's String Quartets Nos. 7&8, an American Chamber Music disc, a double CD of the complete violin works by Prokofiev, a disc featuring concertos by Britten and Shostakovich, four CDs of the music of Béla Bartók as well as a recording of Tchaikovsky's complete oeuvre for violin. Upcoming releases will include works by Franck, Strauss, Leclair, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Janácek, and Tartini. His recordings have been honored with many international awards and prizes, including a Grammy, a Gramophone, and nine Juno Awards.

James Ehnes was born in 1976 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. He began violin studies at the age of four, and at age nine became a protégé of the noted Canadian violinist Francis Chaplin. He studied with Sally Thomas at the Meadowmount School of Music and from 1993 to 1997 at The Juilliard School, winning the Peter Mennin Prize for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music upon his graduation. Mr. Ehnes first gained national recognition in 1987 as winner of the Grand Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Competition. The following year he won the First Prize in Strings at the Canadian Music Festival, the youngest musician ever to do so. At age 13, he made his major orchestral solo debut with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

He has won numerous awards and prizes, including the first-ever Ivan Galamian Memorial Award, the Canada Council for the Arts' Virginia Parker Prize, and a 2005 Avery Fisher Career Grant. James has been honoured by Brandon University with a Doctor of Music degree (honoris causa) and in 2007 he became the youngest person ever elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of Canada. In 2010 the Governor General of Canada appointed James a Member of the Order of Canada, and in 2013 he was named an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music, limited to a select group of 300 living distinguished musicians.

James Ehnes plays the "Marsick" Stradivarius of 1715. He currently lives in Bradenton, Florida with his family.

Andreas Delfs
Andreas Delfs currently holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra where, during twelve seasons as Music Director, he was instrumental in the orchestra’s rise to national prominence. He has held chief artistic posts with several orchestras both in North America and Europe. He led the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra as Music Director (2001-2004) and artistic consultant (2004 -2006). He served as General Music Director of Hannover, Germany (1995-2000), conducting the symphony orchestra and opera company. Prior to his time in Hannover, Andreas Delfs was Music Director of the Bern Opera, resident conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony (during the tenure of Lorin Maazel) and Music Director, at an early age, of the Orchestre Suisse des Jeunes.

Born in Flensburg, Germany, Andreas Delfs began studying piano and music theory at age 5. He studied with Christoph von Dohnányi and Aldo Ceccato at the Hamburg Conservatory. At 20 Andreas Delfs became the youngest ever Music Director of the Hamburg University Orchestra and Musical Assistant at the Hamburg State Opera. Enrolling at The Juilliard School, Andreas Delfs studied with Jorge Mester and Sixten Ehrling and won the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship.

Andreas Delfs keeps an active guest conducting schedule. Recent highlights have included appearances with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, Calgary Philharmonic, Copenhagen Philharmonic, NCPA Orchestra China, Singapore Symphony, Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Staatsorchester Rheinische Philharmonie, National Symphony Orchestra Washington, and Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. He conducted the Britten Sinfonia in a performance ofElijah at London’s Barbican Hall as well as two new operatic productions, namely Turandot at Opera Lyra Ottawa and Carmen at Opera North.

Mr. Delfs has conducted numerous world premieres and has close links with many of today’s composers. He counts among his profound musical inspirations musicians such as John Corigliano, Philip Glass, Roberto Sierra and Hans Werner Henze. He is the frequent partner to many of the world’s most renowned solo artists, including Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yo Yo Ma and Renée Fleming.

Andreas Delfs’s more recent recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D with Susanne Hou and the London Symphony Orchestra, Robert Sierra’s Missa Latina with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra on the Naxos label and Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and pianist John O’Conor on the Telarc label. Other recording projects have included a collection of sacred songs with Renée Fleming for Decca, a production of Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for Avie, as well as a recording of Mozart’s Requiem, with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra.

Over the years Andreas Delfs has led numerous distinguished ensembles. He has conducted orchestras such as the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra.

Among Andreas Delfs’ most notable operatic achievements has been his highly praised debut with the New York City Opera conducting performances of Carmen and a production of the uncut version of Hans Werner Henze’s monumental König Hirsch for the Württemberg State Theatre in Stuttgart. He led four productions at the Aspen Music Festival and gave the Swiss premiere of György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre, which received special praise from the composer.

7/19/2015 7/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Carlos Izcaray (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CARLOS IZCARAY, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor Carlos Izcaray, the WYSO will perform Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra" and Adams' "Short Ride In A Fast Machine" and "Tromba Lontana."

Carlos Izcaray is the newly appointed Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra. Praised by the international press, he won top prizes at the 2007 Aspen Music Festival and later at the 2008 Toscanini International Conducting Competition. Since then he has conducted numerous ensembles in the United States, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, Portugal, Macedonia, Thailand, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela.

In the symphonic platform, has led the St. Louis Symphony, Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Orchester der Komischen Oper Berlin, Malmö Symfoniorkester, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini, Orchestra Regionale dell'Emilia-Romagna, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Macedonian Philharmonic, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia,  Bahia Symphony Orchestra,  Salta Symphony Orchestra, Venezuela Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas, Orquesta Filarmónica Nacional de Venezuela, and many other ensembles from Venezuela's orchestral network. Throughout his career he has shown special interest and prowess in tackling some of the most complex scores in the symphonic repertoire while also championing the historically informed approach to works from past eras. In addition to his future concerts as Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, other upcoming engagements include the Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Gran Rapids Symphony, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, Macedonian Philharmonic, the Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio, stage performances of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor in Lima-Peru, and debut performances in South Africa with the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.

As a strong believer of supporting the younger generations, Carlos has worked extensively with the world's leading music education institutions, including his country's own El Sistema, as well as Fundación Batuta of Colombia, Filarmónica Joven de Colombia, Neojiba in Brazil, London Schools Symphony Orchestra, and Cambridge University Music Society, where he has also taught conducting workshops. Next summer includes a debut at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, where he will lead a performance with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra.

A distinguished instrumentalist, Izcaray was featured as concert soloist worldwide, and he served as Principal Cello and Artistic President of the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra prior to engaging fully on a podium career. His musical philosophy is clearly rooted in chamber music, having studied in depth with members of the legendary LaSalle, Vermeer, Borodin, Tokyo, Takács, Orion, Emerson, Penderecki, Carmina, Colorado, Fine Arts, Miami, and Cleveland string quartets. During his student years, he won the Kuttner Prize, the top chamber music award at Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music. Increasingly active as a composer, Izcaray's most recent orchestral piece, Cota Mil, was premiered by the Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas.

Based in Berlin, Carlos Izcaray was born in Caracas into a family of several artistic generations. At age 3 he was enrolled in Venezuela's public system of youth orchestras, continuing later from age 7 at the Emil Friedman Conservatory, one of the few schools in the world that promotes music as the root and essence of education. There, he was immersed in musical activities both as a boy chorister as well as instrumentalist. He studied conducting with his father since he was a teenager, and went on to become a distinguished fellow at the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen. Izcaray is an alumnus of the Interlochen Arts Academy, New World School of the Arts, and Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. He is a dual citizen of Spain and Venezuela.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Carlos Izcaray (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CARLOS IZCARAY, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor Carlos Izcaray, the WYSO will perform Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra" and Adams' "Short Ride In A Fast Machine" and "Tromba Lontana."

Carlos Izcaray is the newly appointed Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra. Praised by the international press, he won top prizes at the 2007 Aspen Music Festival and later at the 2008 Toscanini International Conducting Competition. Since then he has conducted numerous ensembles in the United States, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, Portugal, Macedonia, Thailand, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela.

In the symphonic platform, has led the St. Louis Symphony, Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Orchester der Komischen Oper Berlin, Malmö Symfoniorkester, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini, Orchestra Regionale dell'Emilia-Romagna, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Macedonian Philharmonic, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia,  Bahia Symphony Orchestra,  Salta Symphony Orchestra, Venezuela Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas, Orquesta Filarmónica Nacional de Venezuela, and many other ensembles from Venezuela's orchestral network. Throughout his career he has shown special interest and prowess in tackling some of the most complex scores in the symphonic repertoire while also championing the historically informed approach to works from past eras. In addition to his future concerts as Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, other upcoming engagements include the Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Gran Rapids Symphony, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, Macedonian Philharmonic, the Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio, stage performances of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor in Lima-Peru, and debut performances in South Africa with the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.

As a strong believer of supporting the younger generations, Carlos has worked extensively with the world's leading music education institutions, including his country's own El Sistema, as well as Fundación Batuta of Colombia, Filarmónica Joven de Colombia, Neojiba in Brazil, London Schools Symphony Orchestra, and Cambridge University Music Society, where he has also taught conducting workshops. Next summer includes a debut at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, where he will lead a performance with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra.

A distinguished instrumentalist, Izcaray was featured as concert soloist worldwide, and he served as Principal Cello and Artistic President of the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra prior to engaging fully on a podium career. His musical philosophy is clearly rooted in chamber music, having studied in depth with members of the legendary LaSalle, Vermeer, Borodin, Tokyo, Takács, Orion, Emerson, Penderecki, Carmina, Colorado, Fine Arts, Miami, and Cleveland string quartets. During his student years, he won the Kuttner Prize, the top chamber music award at Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music. Increasingly active as a composer, Izcaray's most recent orchestral piece, Cota Mil, was premiered by the Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas.

Based in Berlin, Carlos Izcaray was born in Caracas into a family of several artistic generations. At age 3 he was enrolled in Venezuela's public system of youth orchestras, continuing later from age 7 at the Emil Friedman Conservatory, one of the few schools in the world that promotes music as the root and essence of education. There, he was immersed in musical activities both as a boy chorister as well as instrumentalist. He studied conducting with his father since he was a teenager, and went on to become a distinguished fellow at the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen. Izcaray is an alumnus of the Interlochen Arts Academy, New World School of the Arts, and Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. He is a dual citizen of Spain and Venezuela.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Carlos Izcaray (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CARLOS IZCARAY, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor Carlos Izcaray, the WYSO will perform Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra" and Adams' "Short Ride In A Fast Machine" and "Tromba Lontana."

Carlos Izcaray is the newly appointed Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra. Praised by the international press, he won top prizes at the 2007 Aspen Music Festival and later at the 2008 Toscanini International Conducting Competition. Since then he has conducted numerous ensembles in the United States, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, Portugal, Macedonia, Thailand, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela.

In the symphonic platform, has led the St. Louis Symphony, Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Orchester der Komischen Oper Berlin, Malmö Symfoniorkester, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini, Orchestra Regionale dell'Emilia-Romagna, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Macedonian Philharmonic, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia,  Bahia Symphony Orchestra,  Salta Symphony Orchestra, Venezuela Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas, Orquesta Filarmónica Nacional de Venezuela, and many other ensembles from Venezuela's orchestral network. Throughout his career he has shown special interest and prowess in tackling some of the most complex scores in the symphonic repertoire while also championing the historically informed approach to works from past eras. In addition to his future concerts as Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, other upcoming engagements include the Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Gran Rapids Symphony, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, Macedonian Philharmonic, the Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio, stage performances of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor in Lima-Peru, and debut performances in South Africa with the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.

As a strong believer of supporting the younger generations, Carlos has worked extensively with the world's leading music education institutions, including his country's own El Sistema, as well as Fundación Batuta of Colombia, Filarmónica Joven de Colombia, Neojiba in Brazil, London Schools Symphony Orchestra, and Cambridge University Music Society, where he has also taught conducting workshops. Next summer includes a debut at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, where he will lead a performance with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra.

A distinguished instrumentalist, Izcaray was featured as concert soloist worldwide, and he served as Principal Cello and Artistic President of the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra prior to engaging fully on a podium career. His musical philosophy is clearly rooted in chamber music, having studied in depth with members of the legendary LaSalle, Vermeer, Borodin, Tokyo, Takács, Orion, Emerson, Penderecki, Carmina, Colorado, Fine Arts, Miami, and Cleveland string quartets. During his student years, he won the Kuttner Prize, the top chamber music award at Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music. Increasingly active as a composer, Izcaray's most recent orchestral piece, Cota Mil, was premiered by the Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas.

Based in Berlin, Carlos Izcaray was born in Caracas into a family of several artistic generations. At age 3 he was enrolled in Venezuela's public system of youth orchestras, continuing later from age 7 at the Emil Friedman Conservatory, one of the few schools in the world that promotes music as the root and essence of education. There, he was immersed in musical activities both as a boy chorister as well as instrumentalist. He studied conducting with his father since he was a teenager, and went on to become a distinguished fellow at the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen. Izcaray is an alumnus of the Interlochen Arts Academy, New World School of the Arts, and Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. He is a dual citizen of Spain and Venezuela.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Carlos Izcaray (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CARLOS IZCARAY, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor Carlos Izcaray, the WYSO will perform Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra" and Adams' "Short Ride In A Fast Machine" and "Tromba Lontana."

Carlos Izcaray is the newly appointed Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra. Praised by the international press, he won top prizes at the 2007 Aspen Music Festival and later at the 2008 Toscanini International Conducting Competition. Since then he has conducted numerous ensembles in the United States, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, Portugal, Macedonia, Thailand, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela.

In the symphonic platform, has led the St. Louis Symphony, Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Orchester der Komischen Oper Berlin, Malmö Symfoniorkester, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini, Orchestra Regionale dell'Emilia-Romagna, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Macedonian Philharmonic, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia,  Bahia Symphony Orchestra,  Salta Symphony Orchestra, Venezuela Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas, Orquesta Filarmónica Nacional de Venezuela, and many other ensembles from Venezuela's orchestral network. Throughout his career he has shown special interest and prowess in tackling some of the most complex scores in the symphonic repertoire while also championing the historically informed approach to works from past eras. In addition to his future concerts as Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, other upcoming engagements include the Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Gran Rapids Symphony, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, Macedonian Philharmonic, the Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio, stage performances of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor in Lima-Peru, and debut performances in South Africa with the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.

As a strong believer of supporting the younger generations, Carlos has worked extensively with the world's leading music education institutions, including his country's own El Sistema, as well as Fundación Batuta of Colombia, Filarmónica Joven de Colombia, Neojiba in Brazil, London Schools Symphony Orchestra, and Cambridge University Music Society, where he has also taught conducting workshops. Next summer includes a debut at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, where he will lead a performance with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra.

A distinguished instrumentalist, Izcaray was featured as concert soloist worldwide, and he served as Principal Cello and Artistic President of the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra prior to engaging fully on a podium career. His musical philosophy is clearly rooted in chamber music, having studied in depth with members of the legendary LaSalle, Vermeer, Borodin, Tokyo, Takács, Orion, Emerson, Penderecki, Carmina, Colorado, Fine Arts, Miami, and Cleveland string quartets. During his student years, he won the Kuttner Prize, the top chamber music award at Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music. Increasingly active as a composer, Izcaray's most recent orchestral piece, Cota Mil, was premiered by the Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas.

Based in Berlin, Carlos Izcaray was born in Caracas into a family of several artistic generations. At age 3 he was enrolled in Venezuela's public system of youth orchestras, continuing later from age 7 at the Emil Friedman Conservatory, one of the few schools in the world that promotes music as the root and essence of education. There, he was immersed in musical activities both as a boy chorister as well as instrumentalist. He studied conducting with his father since he was a teenager, and went on to become a distinguished fellow at the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen. Izcaray is an alumnus of the Interlochen Arts Academy, New World School of the Arts, and Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. He is a dual citizen of Spain and Venezuela.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Carlos Izcaray (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CARLOS IZCARAY, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor Carlos Izcaray, the WYSO will perform Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra" and Adams' "Short Ride In A Fast Machine" and "Tromba Lontana."

Carlos Izcaray is the newly appointed Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra. Praised by the international press, he won top prizes at the 2007 Aspen Music Festival and later at the 2008 Toscanini International Conducting Competition. Since then he has conducted numerous ensembles in the United States, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, Portugal, Macedonia, Thailand, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela.

In the symphonic platform, has led the St. Louis Symphony, Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Orchester der Komischen Oper Berlin, Malmö Symfoniorkester, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini, Orchestra Regionale dell'Emilia-Romagna, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Macedonian Philharmonic, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia,  Bahia Symphony Orchestra,  Salta Symphony Orchestra, Venezuela Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas, Orquesta Filarmónica Nacional de Venezuela, and many other ensembles from Venezuela's orchestral network. Throughout his career he has shown special interest and prowess in tackling some of the most complex scores in the symphonic repertoire while also championing the historically informed approach to works from past eras. In addition to his future concerts as Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, other upcoming engagements include the Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Gran Rapids Symphony, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, Macedonian Philharmonic, the Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio, stage performances of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor in Lima-Peru, and debut performances in South Africa with the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.

As a strong believer of supporting the younger generations, Carlos has worked extensively with the world's leading music education institutions, including his country's own El Sistema, as well as Fundación Batuta of Colombia, Filarmónica Joven de Colombia, Neojiba in Brazil, London Schools Symphony Orchestra, and Cambridge University Music Society, where he has also taught conducting workshops. Next summer includes a debut at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, where he will lead a performance with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra.

A distinguished instrumentalist, Izcaray was featured as concert soloist worldwide, and he served as Principal Cello and Artistic President of the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra prior to engaging fully on a podium career. His musical philosophy is clearly rooted in chamber music, having studied in depth with members of the legendary LaSalle, Vermeer, Borodin, Tokyo, Takács, Orion, Emerson, Penderecki, Carmina, Colorado, Fine Arts, Miami, and Cleveland string quartets. During his student years, he won the Kuttner Prize, the top chamber music award at Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music. Increasingly active as a composer, Izcaray's most recent orchestral piece, Cota Mil, was premiered by the Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas.

Based in Berlin, Carlos Izcaray was born in Caracas into a family of several artistic generations. At age 3 he was enrolled in Venezuela's public system of youth orchestras, continuing later from age 7 at the Emil Friedman Conservatory, one of the few schools in the world that promotes music as the root and essence of education. There, he was immersed in musical activities both as a boy chorister as well as instrumentalist. He studied conducting with his father since he was a teenager, and went on to become a distinguished fellow at the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen. Izcaray is an alumnus of the Interlochen Arts Academy, New World School of the Arts, and Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. He is a dual citizen of Spain and Venezuela.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Carlos Izcaray (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CARLOS IZCARAY, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor Carlos Izcaray, the WYSO will perform Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra" and Adams' "Short Ride In A Fast Machine" and "Tromba Lontana."

Carlos Izcaray is the newly appointed Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra. Praised by the international press, he won top prizes at the 2007 Aspen Music Festival and later at the 2008 Toscanini International Conducting Competition. Since then he has conducted numerous ensembles in the United States, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, Portugal, Macedonia, Thailand, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela.

In the symphonic platform, has led the St. Louis Symphony, Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Orchester der Komischen Oper Berlin, Malmö Symfoniorkester, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini, Orchestra Regionale dell'Emilia-Romagna, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Macedonian Philharmonic, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia,  Bahia Symphony Orchestra,  Salta Symphony Orchestra, Venezuela Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas, Orquesta Filarmónica Nacional de Venezuela, and many other ensembles from Venezuela's orchestral network. Throughout his career he has shown special interest and prowess in tackling some of the most complex scores in the symphonic repertoire while also championing the historically informed approach to works from past eras. In addition to his future concerts as Music Director Designate of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, other upcoming engagements include the Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Gran Rapids Symphony, Bangkok Symphony Orchestra, Macedonian Philharmonic, the Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio, stage performances of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor in Lima-Peru, and debut performances in South Africa with the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.

As a strong believer of supporting the younger generations, Carlos has worked extensively with the world's leading music education institutions, including his country's own El Sistema, as well as Fundación Batuta of Colombia, Filarmónica Joven de Colombia, Neojiba in Brazil, London Schools Symphony Orchestra, and Cambridge University Music Society, where he has also taught conducting workshops. Next summer includes a debut at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, where he will lead a performance with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra.

A distinguished instrumentalist, Izcaray was featured as concert soloist worldwide, and he served as Principal Cello and Artistic President of the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra prior to engaging fully on a podium career. His musical philosophy is clearly rooted in chamber music, having studied in depth with members of the legendary LaSalle, Vermeer, Borodin, Tokyo, Takács, Orion, Emerson, Penderecki, Carmina, Colorado, Fine Arts, Miami, and Cleveland string quartets. During his student years, he won the Kuttner Prize, the top chamber music award at Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music. Increasingly active as a composer, Izcaray's most recent orchestral piece, Cota Mil, was premiered by the Orquesta Sinfónica Municipal de Caracas.

Based in Berlin, Carlos Izcaray was born in Caracas into a family of several artistic generations. At age 3 he was enrolled in Venezuela's public system of youth orchestras, continuing later from age 7 at the Emil Friedman Conservatory, one of the few schools in the world that promotes music as the root and essence of education. There, he was immersed in musical activities both as a boy chorister as well as instrumentalist. He studied conducting with his father since he was a teenager, and went on to become a distinguished fellow at the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen. Izcaray is an alumnus of the Interlochen Arts Academy, New World School of the Arts, and Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. He is a dual citizen of Spain and Venezuela.

7/26/2015 7/26/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/JoAnn Falletta (7/12 - 8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with JOANN FALLETTA, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, the WYSO will perform Dvorak's "Symphony No. 9" and Berlioz's "Roman Carnival Overture."

JoAnn Falletta is internationally celebrated as a vibrant ambassador for music and an inspiring artistic leader. An effervescent and exuberant figure on the podium, she has been praised by The Washington Post as having "Toscanini's tight control over ensemble, Walter's affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowski's gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein." Acclaimed by The New York Times as "one of the finest conductors of her generation," she serves as the Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center.

Ms. Falletta is invited to guest conduct many of the world's finest orchestras. She has guest conducted over a hundred orchestras in North America, and many of the most prominent orchestras in Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. Her North America guest conducting appearances have included the orchestras of Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Seattle, San Diego, and the National Symphony as well as Montreal and Toronto. International appearances include the London Symphony, Liverpool and Manchester-BBC Philharmonics, Scottish BBC Orchestra, Czech and Rotterdam Philharmonics, Orchestra National de Lyon, Mannheim Orchestra and the Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra. Asian engagements include appearances with the Korean Broadcast Symphony, Seoul Philharmonic, China National Symphony and the Shanghai Symphony. Ms. Falletta's summer activities have taken her to numerous music festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, the Hollywood Bowl, Wolf Trap, Mann Center, Meadow Brook, OK Mozart Festival and the Grand Teton Festival.
 
Recent guest conducting highlights include her a European tour with the Stuttgart Orchestra, return engagements with the Belgrade Philharmonic (Serbia), the Warsaw, Krakow, Detroit, Phoenix, Puerto Rico and Hawaii Symphony Orchestras as well as debuts with the Gothenburg Symphony, the Orchestra of St. Luke's at Carnegie Hall, and a 13 city US tour with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and soloist James Galway.
 
Since stepping up to the podium as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in 1999, Maestro Falletta has been credited with bringing it to a new level of national and international prominence. During her tenure, the Orchestra's budget has grown by 25 percent and subscriptions have reached record levels. Under her direction, the BPO is continuing its trajectory as one of the most recorded orchestras in America. In addition to receiving two Grammy awards and six nominations, Falletta and the BPO have garnered numerous ASCAP awards, including the top award for Adventurous Programming in 2011, 2013 and 2014, two acclaimed Carnegie Hall performances in 2004 and 2013, two highly successful Florida tours, the establishment of the orchestra's own Beau Fleuve label, the founding of the JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition in partnership with WNED, and the national and international broadcast of BPO concerts on NPR's Performance Today, SymphonyCast, and the European Broadcasting Union. Other recent broadcasts include a national PBS televised special, Bernstein's Ode to Freedom featuring Ms. Falletta as host, and a PBS special of the Four Seasons with Mark O'Connor and Catherine Cho.
 
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra's 2015-16 Season celebrates the 75th anniversary of Kleinhans Music Hall, with major guest artists such as Lang Lang, Chris Botti and Andre Watts, and works showcasing the hall's exquisite acoustics. Recording highlights for the Buffalo Philharmonic's 2015-16 season include the release by Naxos of the music of Florent Schmitt, and Beau Fleuve releases of The Essential Sibelius in honor of his birthday and the BPO's Finland Celebration, and the Orchestra's first ever Children's CD, featuring Carnival of the Animals, Sorcerer's Apprentice and Mother Goose Suite. Recent releases on the BPO's own Beau Fleuve label include include Built for Buffalo, a disc featuring three works commissioned by the orchestra, Nordic Masters celebrating the 150th birthday of both Jean Sibelius and Carl Nielsen, and Live in Concert with works by Mozart, Dvořák, and Rachmaninoff. During the 2013-14 season, Naxos released Gliere's Symphony No.3, Tyberg's Symphony No.2, Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, and Beige, and Gershwin's Concerto in F, Rhapsody in Blue, Strike up the Band and Promenade.
 
Under Falletta's direction, the VSO has risen to celebrated artistic heights performing classics, pops and family concerts in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and Williamsburg and made critically acclaimed debuts at the Kennedy Center and New York's Carnegie Hall Highlights of the Virginia Symphony's 2015-16 season include a Beethoven Festival, and performances by violinist Sarah Chang, pianist Natasha Paremski and cellist Zuill Baile. JoAnn will also record three discs for the Naxos label with the Virginia Arts Festival; Mahler (arr. Schoenberg) The Song of the Earth, The Songs of a Wayfarer, and two discs of music of Stravinsky, The Soldier's Tale (complete) and Suite from The Soldier's Tale, Les Noces and Octet. The discs, expected to be released in early 2016, are part of a new recording agreement with Naxos.
 
Falletta is the recipient of many of the most prestigious conducting awards including the Seaver/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award for exceptionally gifted American conductors, the coveted Stokowski Competition and the Toscanini, Ditson and Bruno Walter Awards for conducting, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra League's prestigious John S. Edwards Award. She has introduced over 500 works by American composers, including 110 world premieres. Hailing her as a "leading force for the music of our time," the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers has honored JoAnn Falletta with twelve ASCAP awards, recognizing her work as a conductor, communicator, recording artist, audience builder, champion of American composers and distinguished musical citizen. Ms. Falletta served as a Member of the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.
 
Few artists are as important to the fabric of their communities as JoAnn Falletta. She was named Buffalo's Most Influential Civic Leader, Buffalo and Erie County's Artist of the Year, was inducted into the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, and was presented with the Chancellor Charles P. Norton Medal, the University of Buffalo's highest award. She received the Foundation for Jewish Philanthropies Award for outstanding leadership in the Marcel Tyberg Musical Legacy project. The JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition has brought international acclaim and attention to the classical guitar, the Buffalo region and the BPO. Falletta is a member of the Western New York Women's Hall of Fame, and received the Human Relations Award from the Buffalo/Niagara Chapter of the American Jewish Committee. In Virginia, she earned a star on Norfolk's Legends of Music Walk of Fame in recognition of her effect on the appreciation of classical music in Hampton Roads and Virginia, was named Norfolk's Downtowner of the Year and received the Virginia Women in History Award.
 
Falletta is a strong advocate and mentor for young professional and student musicians. She has led seminars for women conductors for the League of American Orchestras, established a unique collaboration between the BPO and Mannes College to give up-and-coming conductors professional experience with a leading American orchestra, and has great success working with young musicians, guest conducting the orchestras of many of the top conservatories, including Curtis, Juilliard, Mannes and The Manhattan School and summer programs at Interlochen, Round Top and Brevard, among others. In 2015, JoAnn will be one of the first conductors to work with the newly formed innovative, international educational orchestra created by Leon Botstein and Bard College.

In addition to the release of the two new Naxos discs by Falletta with the Buffalo Philharmonic, this season also saw a world premiere disc of music of Ken Fuchs with the London Symphony Orchestra and a second disc of the music of John Knowles Paine with the Ulster Orchestra. Her growing discography, which includes over 90 titles, consists of recordings with the Long Beach Symphony, Philadelphia Philharmonia, Women's Philharmonic, Netherlands Radio Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, English Chamber Orchestra, New Zealand Symphony, Czech National Symphony, among others. In addition to her double Grammy Award-winning Corigliano disc, her Grammy nominated discs include recordings with the Buffalo Philharmonic of Tyberg's Symphony No. 3, Corigliano's Red Violin, Schubert's Death and the Maiden, Strauss' Rosenkavalier, and Dohnanyi's Variations on a Nursery Song. In 2013, four of Falletta's Naxos discs with the London Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Virginia Symphony and Ulster Orchestra were Grammy nominated as part of the body of work by producer Tim Handley for Best Producer. She received her first Grammy nomination in 2006 for Fuch's Eventide Concerto for English Horn, Harp, Percussion, and String Orchestra, with the London Symphony, from the CD An American Place. Her recording of Gliere's Symphony No.3has received worldwide acclaim, including 5 stars and a top pick from BBC Music Magazine. The Washington Post selected her 2011 recording of piano music of Arvo Pärt as a top disc of the year. Her recording of Jack Gallagher's music with the London Symphony received five stars from BBC Music Magazine and Audiophile Audition, and was selected as a Best of 2010 by Minnesota Public Radio and listed among Fanfare Magazine's Want List for 2011. Discs of the music of Respighi and Griffes, both on the Naxos label with the Buffalo Philharmonic, were selected as Editor's Choice Recordings by Gramophone. Other recent Naxos discs include Joseph Suk's Fairy Tale, world premiere recordings of Daron Hagen's opera Shining Brow, based on the early years of Frank Lloyd Wright, and two "new" works by Franz Schubert, featuring the completion of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, and a newly orchestrated transcription of Death and the Maiden, her first recording with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra featuring the violin concertos of Dohnányi, the music of Paul Schoenfield with the Prague Philharmonia, the works of Aaron Copland with the BPO, and Borrowed Treasures, Ms Falletta's third disc of chamber music featuring her on guitar.
 
Earlier discs of note include Burchfield Gallery, with music by Morton Gould and Jean Sibelius (BPO), Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, Behzad Ranjbaran's Persian Trilogy with the London Symphony (Delos), The Music of Frederick Converse (Naxos) and Pictures at a Gallery by the Buffalo Philharmonic (Beau Fleuve), The American Clarinet, with the Czech National Symphony (Albany), Schubert's Guitar (Koch), featuring Ms. Falletta as guitarist and arranger, Impressions of French Music and Rhapsodie with the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Peter and the Wolf and the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, with the Virginia Symphony and celebrities from National Public Radio, released on the NPR label.
 
Ms. Falletta made three recordings of works by women composers with the Women's Philharmonic. Of special interest is her recording of works by Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Lili Boulanger and Germaine Tailleferre, which received a Best Classical Recording award from the National Association of Independent Record Distributors and a Most Creative Programming award from Classic CD Magazine. Additional recordings feature music by Poulenc, Ravel, Moross, Shulamit Ran, Elinor Armer and John Luther Adams.

Ms. Falletta's radio and television credits include numerous appearances on Fresh Air, All Things Considered and From the Top, WQXR, WNCN, CBS Sunday Morning, the Charlie Rose Show, the MacNeil Lehrer News Hour, BBC Radio, and several nationally televised performances on PBS including Live from Lincoln Center-Juilliard at 80, Seasons of Life with Mark O'Connor and the BPO, and a special PBS TV documentary about music with Penn & Teller. As a writer, Ms. Falletta has contributed articles to Symphony Magazine, the New York Concert Review, the Virginian Pilot, Portfolio Magazine and Traffic East Magazine. A poem from Ms. Falletta's first poetry book, Love Letters to Music, is the text setting for a work by composer Paul English that premiered in 2012.
 
Ms. Falletta served as Principal Conductor of the Ulster Orchestra in Northern Ireland from 2011-14 where she made her debut at London's prestigious Proms with the orchestra and made five recordings with the orchestra for Naxos, including music of Gustav Holst, Ernest John Moeran and John Knowles Paine. She has held the positions of Artistic Advisor to the Honolulu Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of the Phoenix Symphony, Music Director of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra, Associate Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Denver Chamber Orchestra, the Queens Philharmonic and the Women's Philharmonic.
 
Ms. Falletta received her undergraduate degree from the Mannes College of Music, her master's and doctorate degrees from The Juilliard School, and in addition, has been awarded eleven honorary doctorates.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/JoAnn Falletta (7/12 - 8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with JOANN FALLETTA, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, the WYSO will perform Dvorak's "Symphony No. 9" and Berlioz's "Roman Carnival Overture."

JoAnn Falletta is internationally celebrated as a vibrant ambassador for music and an inspiring artistic leader. An effervescent and exuberant figure on the podium, she has been praised by The Washington Post as having "Toscanini's tight control over ensemble, Walter's affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowski's gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein." Acclaimed by The New York Times as "one of the finest conductors of her generation," she serves as the Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center.

Ms. Falletta is invited to guest conduct many of the world's finest orchestras. She has guest conducted over a hundred orchestras in North America, and many of the most prominent orchestras in Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. Her North America guest conducting appearances have included the orchestras of Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Seattle, San Diego, and the National Symphony as well as Montreal and Toronto. International appearances include the London Symphony, Liverpool and Manchester-BBC Philharmonics, Scottish BBC Orchestra, Czech and Rotterdam Philharmonics, Orchestra National de Lyon, Mannheim Orchestra and the Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra. Asian engagements include appearances with the Korean Broadcast Symphony, Seoul Philharmonic, China National Symphony and the Shanghai Symphony. Ms. Falletta's summer activities have taken her to numerous music festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, the Hollywood Bowl, Wolf Trap, Mann Center, Meadow Brook, OK Mozart Festival and the Grand Teton Festival.
 
Recent guest conducting highlights include her a European tour with the Stuttgart Orchestra, return engagements with the Belgrade Philharmonic (Serbia), the Warsaw, Krakow, Detroit, Phoenix, Puerto Rico and Hawaii Symphony Orchestras as well as debuts with the Gothenburg Symphony, the Orchestra of St. Luke's at Carnegie Hall, and a 13 city US tour with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and soloist James Galway.
 
Since stepping up to the podium as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in 1999, Maestro Falletta has been credited with bringing it to a new level of national and international prominence. During her tenure, the Orchestra's budget has grown by 25 percent and subscriptions have reached record levels. Under her direction, the BPO is continuing its trajectory as one of the most recorded orchestras in America. In addition to receiving two Grammy awards and six nominations, Falletta and the BPO have garnered numerous ASCAP awards, including the top award for Adventurous Programming in 2011, 2013 and 2014, two acclaimed Carnegie Hall performances in 2004 and 2013, two highly successful Florida tours, the establishment of the orchestra's own Beau Fleuve label, the founding of the JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition in partnership with WNED, and the national and international broadcast of BPO concerts on NPR's Performance Today, SymphonyCast, and the European Broadcasting Union. Other recent broadcasts include a national PBS televised special, Bernstein's Ode to Freedom featuring Ms. Falletta as host, and a PBS special of the Four Seasons with Mark O'Connor and Catherine Cho.
 
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra's 2015-16 Season celebrates the 75th anniversary of Kleinhans Music Hall, with major guest artists such as Lang Lang, Chris Botti and Andre Watts, and works showcasing the hall's exquisite acoustics. Recording highlights for the Buffalo Philharmonic's 2015-16 season include the release by Naxos of the music of Florent Schmitt, and Beau Fleuve releases of The Essential Sibelius in honor of his birthday and the BPO's Finland Celebration, and the Orchestra's first ever Children's CD, featuring Carnival of the Animals, Sorcerer's Apprentice and Mother Goose Suite. Recent releases on the BPO's own Beau Fleuve label include include Built for Buffalo, a disc featuring three works commissioned by the orchestra, Nordic Masters celebrating the 150th birthday of both Jean Sibelius and Carl Nielsen, and Live in Concert with works by Mozart, Dvořák, and Rachmaninoff. During the 2013-14 season, Naxos released Gliere's Symphony No.3, Tyberg's Symphony No.2, Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, and Beige, and Gershwin's Concerto in F, Rhapsody in Blue, Strike up the Band and Promenade.
 
Under Falletta's direction, the VSO has risen to celebrated artistic heights performing classics, pops and family concerts in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and Williamsburg and made critically acclaimed debuts at the Kennedy Center and New York's Carnegie Hall Highlights of the Virginia Symphony's 2015-16 season include a Beethoven Festival, and performances by violinist Sarah Chang, pianist Natasha Paremski and cellist Zuill Baile. JoAnn will also record three discs for the Naxos label with the Virginia Arts Festival; Mahler (arr. Schoenberg) The Song of the Earth, The Songs of a Wayfarer, and two discs of music of Stravinsky, The Soldier's Tale (complete) and Suite from The Soldier's Tale, Les Noces and Octet. The discs, expected to be released in early 2016, are part of a new recording agreement with Naxos.
 
Falletta is the recipient of many of the most prestigious conducting awards including the Seaver/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award for exceptionally gifted American conductors, the coveted Stokowski Competition and the Toscanini, Ditson and Bruno Walter Awards for conducting, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra League's prestigious John S. Edwards Award. She has introduced over 500 works by American composers, including 110 world premieres. Hailing her as a "leading force for the music of our time," the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers has honored JoAnn Falletta with twelve ASCAP awards, recognizing her work as a conductor, communicator, recording artist, audience builder, champion of American composers and distinguished musical citizen. Ms. Falletta served as a Member of the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.
 
Few artists are as important to the fabric of their communities as JoAnn Falletta. She was named Buffalo's Most Influential Civic Leader, Buffalo and Erie County's Artist of the Year, was inducted into the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, and was presented with the Chancellor Charles P. Norton Medal, the University of Buffalo's highest award. She received the Foundation for Jewish Philanthropies Award for outstanding leadership in the Marcel Tyberg Musical Legacy project. The JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition has brought international acclaim and attention to the classical guitar, the Buffalo region and the BPO. Falletta is a member of the Western New York Women's Hall of Fame, and received the Human Relations Award from the Buffalo/Niagara Chapter of the American Jewish Committee. In Virginia, she earned a star on Norfolk's Legends of Music Walk of Fame in recognition of her effect on the appreciation of classical music in Hampton Roads and Virginia, was named Norfolk's Downtowner of the Year and received the Virginia Women in History Award.
 
Falletta is a strong advocate and mentor for young professional and student musicians. She has led seminars for women conductors for the League of American Orchestras, established a unique collaboration between the BPO and Mannes College to give up-and-coming conductors professional experience with a leading American orchestra, and has great success working with young musicians, guest conducting the orchestras of many of the top conservatories, including Curtis, Juilliard, Mannes and The Manhattan School and summer programs at Interlochen, Round Top and Brevard, among others. In 2015, JoAnn will be one of the first conductors to work with the newly formed innovative, international educational orchestra created by Leon Botstein and Bard College.

In addition to the release of the two new Naxos discs by Falletta with the Buffalo Philharmonic, this season also saw a world premiere disc of music of Ken Fuchs with the London Symphony Orchestra and a second disc of the music of John Knowles Paine with the Ulster Orchestra. Her growing discography, which includes over 90 titles, consists of recordings with the Long Beach Symphony, Philadelphia Philharmonia, Women's Philharmonic, Netherlands Radio Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, English Chamber Orchestra, New Zealand Symphony, Czech National Symphony, among others. In addition to her double Grammy Award-winning Corigliano disc, her Grammy nominated discs include recordings with the Buffalo Philharmonic of Tyberg's Symphony No. 3, Corigliano's Red Violin, Schubert's Death and the Maiden, Strauss' Rosenkavalier, and Dohnanyi's Variations on a Nursery Song. In 2013, four of Falletta's Naxos discs with the London Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Virginia Symphony and Ulster Orchestra were Grammy nominated as part of the body of work by producer Tim Handley for Best Producer. She received her first Grammy nomination in 2006 for Fuch's Eventide Concerto for English Horn, Harp, Percussion, and String Orchestra, with the London Symphony, from the CD An American Place. Her recording of Gliere's Symphony No.3has received worldwide acclaim, including 5 stars and a top pick from BBC Music Magazine. The Washington Post selected her 2011 recording of piano music of Arvo Pärt as a top disc of the year. Her recording of Jack Gallagher's music with the London Symphony received five stars from BBC Music Magazine and Audiophile Audition, and was selected as a Best of 2010 by Minnesota Public Radio and listed among Fanfare Magazine's Want List for 2011. Discs of the music of Respighi and Griffes, both on the Naxos label with the Buffalo Philharmonic, were selected as Editor's Choice Recordings by Gramophone. Other recent Naxos discs include Joseph Suk's Fairy Tale, world premiere recordings of Daron Hagen's opera Shining Brow, based on the early years of Frank Lloyd Wright, and two "new" works by Franz Schubert, featuring the completion of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, and a newly orchestrated transcription of Death and the Maiden, her first recording with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra featuring the violin concertos of Dohnányi, the music of Paul Schoenfield with the Prague Philharmonia, the works of Aaron Copland with the BPO, and Borrowed Treasures, Ms Falletta's third disc of chamber music featuring her on guitar.
 
Earlier discs of note include Burchfield Gallery, with music by Morton Gould and Jean Sibelius (BPO), Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, Behzad Ranjbaran's Persian Trilogy with the London Symphony (Delos), The Music of Frederick Converse (Naxos) and Pictures at a Gallery by the Buffalo Philharmonic (Beau Fleuve), The American Clarinet, with the Czech National Symphony (Albany), Schubert's Guitar (Koch), featuring Ms. Falletta as guitarist and arranger, Impressions of French Music and Rhapsodie with the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Peter and the Wolf and the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, with the Virginia Symphony and celebrities from National Public Radio, released on the NPR label.
 
Ms. Falletta made three recordings of works by women composers with the Women's Philharmonic. Of special interest is her recording of works by Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Lili Boulanger and Germaine Tailleferre, which received a Best Classical Recording award from the National Association of Independent Record Distributors and a Most Creative Programming award from Classic CD Magazine. Additional recordings feature music by Poulenc, Ravel, Moross, Shulamit Ran, Elinor Armer and John Luther Adams.

Ms. Falletta's radio and television credits include numerous appearances on Fresh Air, All Things Considered and From the Top, WQXR, WNCN, CBS Sunday Morning, the Charlie Rose Show, the MacNeil Lehrer News Hour, BBC Radio, and several nationally televised performances on PBS including Live from Lincoln Center-Juilliard at 80, Seasons of Life with Mark O'Connor and the BPO, and a special PBS TV documentary about music with Penn & Teller. As a writer, Ms. Falletta has contributed articles to Symphony Magazine, the New York Concert Review, the Virginian Pilot, Portfolio Magazine and Traffic East Magazine. A poem from Ms. Falletta's first poetry book, Love Letters to Music, is the text setting for a work by composer Paul English that premiered in 2012.
 
Ms. Falletta served as Principal Conductor of the Ulster Orchestra in Northern Ireland from 2011-14 where she made her debut at London's prestigious Proms with the orchestra and made five recordings with the orchestra for Naxos, including music of Gustav Holst, Ernest John Moeran and John Knowles Paine. She has held the positions of Artistic Advisor to the Honolulu Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of the Phoenix Symphony, Music Director of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra, Associate Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Denver Chamber Orchestra, the Queens Philharmonic and the Women's Philharmonic.
 
Ms. Falletta received her undergraduate degree from the Mannes College of Music, her master's and doctorate degrees from The Juilliard School, and in addition, has been awarded eleven honorary doctorates.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/JoAnn Falletta (7/12 - 8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with JOANN FALLETTA, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, the WYSO will perform Dvorak's "Symphony No. 9" and Berlioz's "Roman Carnival Overture."

JoAnn Falletta is internationally celebrated as a vibrant ambassador for music and an inspiring artistic leader. An effervescent and exuberant figure on the podium, she has been praised by The Washington Post as having "Toscanini's tight control over ensemble, Walter's affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowski's gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein." Acclaimed by The New York Times as "one of the finest conductors of her generation," she serves as the Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center.

Ms. Falletta is invited to guest conduct many of the world's finest orchestras. She has guest conducted over a hundred orchestras in North America, and many of the most prominent orchestras in Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. Her North America guest conducting appearances have included the orchestras of Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Seattle, San Diego, and the National Symphony as well as Montreal and Toronto. International appearances include the London Symphony, Liverpool and Manchester-BBC Philharmonics, Scottish BBC Orchestra, Czech and Rotterdam Philharmonics, Orchestra National de Lyon, Mannheim Orchestra and the Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra. Asian engagements include appearances with the Korean Broadcast Symphony, Seoul Philharmonic, China National Symphony and the Shanghai Symphony. Ms. Falletta's summer activities have taken her to numerous music festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, the Hollywood Bowl, Wolf Trap, Mann Center, Meadow Brook, OK Mozart Festival and the Grand Teton Festival.
 
Recent guest conducting highlights include her a European tour with the Stuttgart Orchestra, return engagements with the Belgrade Philharmonic (Serbia), the Warsaw, Krakow, Detroit, Phoenix, Puerto Rico and Hawaii Symphony Orchestras as well as debuts with the Gothenburg Symphony, the Orchestra of St. Luke's at Carnegie Hall, and a 13 city US tour with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and soloist James Galway.
 
Since stepping up to the podium as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in 1999, Maestro Falletta has been credited with bringing it to a new level of national and international prominence. During her tenure, the Orchestra's budget has grown by 25 percent and subscriptions have reached record levels. Under her direction, the BPO is continuing its trajectory as one of the most recorded orchestras in America. In addition to receiving two Grammy awards and six nominations, Falletta and the BPO have garnered numerous ASCAP awards, including the top award for Adventurous Programming in 2011, 2013 and 2014, two acclaimed Carnegie Hall performances in 2004 and 2013, two highly successful Florida tours, the establishment of the orchestra's own Beau Fleuve label, the founding of the JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition in partnership with WNED, and the national and international broadcast of BPO concerts on NPR's Performance Today, SymphonyCast, and the European Broadcasting Union. Other recent broadcasts include a national PBS televised special, Bernstein's Ode to Freedom featuring Ms. Falletta as host, and a PBS special of the Four Seasons with Mark O'Connor and Catherine Cho.
 
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra's 2015-16 Season celebrates the 75th anniversary of Kleinhans Music Hall, with major guest artists such as Lang Lang, Chris Botti and Andre Watts, and works showcasing the hall's exquisite acoustics. Recording highlights for the Buffalo Philharmonic's 2015-16 season include the release by Naxos of the music of Florent Schmitt, and Beau Fleuve releases of The Essential Sibelius in honor of his birthday and the BPO's Finland Celebration, and the Orchestra's first ever Children's CD, featuring Carnival of the Animals, Sorcerer's Apprentice and Mother Goose Suite. Recent releases on the BPO's own Beau Fleuve label include include Built for Buffalo, a disc featuring three works commissioned by the orchestra, Nordic Masters celebrating the 150th birthday of both Jean Sibelius and Carl Nielsen, and Live in Concert with works by Mozart, Dvořák, and Rachmaninoff. During the 2013-14 season, Naxos released Gliere's Symphony No.3, Tyberg's Symphony No.2, Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, and Beige, and Gershwin's Concerto in F, Rhapsody in Blue, Strike up the Band and Promenade.
 
Under Falletta's direction, the VSO has risen to celebrated artistic heights performing classics, pops and family concerts in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and Williamsburg and made critically acclaimed debuts at the Kennedy Center and New York's Carnegie Hall Highlights of the Virginia Symphony's 2015-16 season include a Beethoven Festival, and performances by violinist Sarah Chang, pianist Natasha Paremski and cellist Zuill Baile. JoAnn will also record three discs for the Naxos label with the Virginia Arts Festival; Mahler (arr. Schoenberg) The Song of the Earth, The Songs of a Wayfarer, and two discs of music of Stravinsky, The Soldier's Tale (complete) and Suite from The Soldier's Tale, Les Noces and Octet. The discs, expected to be released in early 2016, are part of a new recording agreement with Naxos.
 
Falletta is the recipient of many of the most prestigious conducting awards including the Seaver/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award for exceptionally gifted American conductors, the coveted Stokowski Competition and the Toscanini, Ditson and Bruno Walter Awards for conducting, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra League's prestigious John S. Edwards Award. She has introduced over 500 works by American composers, including 110 world premieres. Hailing her as a "leading force for the music of our time," the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers has honored JoAnn Falletta with twelve ASCAP awards, recognizing her work as a conductor, communicator, recording artist, audience builder, champion of American composers and distinguished musical citizen. Ms. Falletta served as a Member of the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.
 
Few artists are as important to the fabric of their communities as JoAnn Falletta. She was named Buffalo's Most Influential Civic Leader, Buffalo and Erie County's Artist of the Year, was inducted into the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, and was presented with the Chancellor Charles P. Norton Medal, the University of Buffalo's highest award. She received the Foundation for Jewish Philanthropies Award for outstanding leadership in the Marcel Tyberg Musical Legacy project. The JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition has brought international acclaim and attention to the classical guitar, the Buffalo region and the BPO. Falletta is a member of the Western New York Women's Hall of Fame, and received the Human Relations Award from the Buffalo/Niagara Chapter of the American Jewish Committee. In Virginia, she earned a star on Norfolk's Legends of Music Walk of Fame in recognition of her effect on the appreciation of classical music in Hampton Roads and Virginia, was named Norfolk's Downtowner of the Year and received the Virginia Women in History Award.
 
Falletta is a strong advocate and mentor for young professional and student musicians. She has led seminars for women conductors for the League of American Orchestras, established a unique collaboration between the BPO and Mannes College to give up-and-coming conductors professional experience with a leading American orchestra, and has great success working with young musicians, guest conducting the orchestras of many of the top conservatories, including Curtis, Juilliard, Mannes and The Manhattan School and summer programs at Interlochen, Round Top and Brevard, among others. In 2015, JoAnn will be one of the first conductors to work with the newly formed innovative, international educational orchestra created by Leon Botstein and Bard College.

In addition to the release of the two new Naxos discs by Falletta with the Buffalo Philharmonic, this season also saw a world premiere disc of music of Ken Fuchs with the London Symphony Orchestra and a second disc of the music of John Knowles Paine with the Ulster Orchestra. Her growing discography, which includes over 90 titles, consists of recordings with the Long Beach Symphony, Philadelphia Philharmonia, Women's Philharmonic, Netherlands Radio Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, English Chamber Orchestra, New Zealand Symphony, Czech National Symphony, among others. In addition to her double Grammy Award-winning Corigliano disc, her Grammy nominated discs include recordings with the Buffalo Philharmonic of Tyberg's Symphony No. 3, Corigliano's Red Violin, Schubert's Death and the Maiden, Strauss' Rosenkavalier, and Dohnanyi's Variations on a Nursery Song. In 2013, four of Falletta's Naxos discs with the London Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Virginia Symphony and Ulster Orchestra were Grammy nominated as part of the body of work by producer Tim Handley for Best Producer. She received her first Grammy nomination in 2006 for Fuch's Eventide Concerto for English Horn, Harp, Percussion, and String Orchestra, with the London Symphony, from the CD An American Place. Her recording of Gliere's Symphony No.3has received worldwide acclaim, including 5 stars and a top pick from BBC Music Magazine. The Washington Post selected her 2011 recording of piano music of Arvo Pärt as a top disc of the year. Her recording of Jack Gallagher's music with the London Symphony received five stars from BBC Music Magazine and Audiophile Audition, and was selected as a Best of 2010 by Minnesota Public Radio and listed among Fanfare Magazine's Want List for 2011. Discs of the music of Respighi and Griffes, both on the Naxos label with the Buffalo Philharmonic, were selected as Editor's Choice Recordings by Gramophone. Other recent Naxos discs include Joseph Suk's Fairy Tale, world premiere recordings of Daron Hagen's opera Shining Brow, based on the early years of Frank Lloyd Wright, and two "new" works by Franz Schubert, featuring the completion of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, and a newly orchestrated transcription of Death and the Maiden, her first recording with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra featuring the violin concertos of Dohnányi, the music of Paul Schoenfield with the Prague Philharmonia, the works of Aaron Copland with the BPO, and Borrowed Treasures, Ms Falletta's third disc of chamber music featuring her on guitar.
 
Earlier discs of note include Burchfield Gallery, with music by Morton Gould and Jean Sibelius (BPO), Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, Behzad Ranjbaran's Persian Trilogy with the London Symphony (Delos), The Music of Frederick Converse (Naxos) and Pictures at a Gallery by the Buffalo Philharmonic (Beau Fleuve), The American Clarinet, with the Czech National Symphony (Albany), Schubert's Guitar (Koch), featuring Ms. Falletta as guitarist and arranger, Impressions of French Music and Rhapsodie with the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Peter and the Wolf and the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, with the Virginia Symphony and celebrities from National Public Radio, released on the NPR label.
 
Ms. Falletta made three recordings of works by women composers with the Women's Philharmonic. Of special interest is her recording of works by Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Lili Boulanger and Germaine Tailleferre, which received a Best Classical Recording award from the National Association of Independent Record Distributors and a Most Creative Programming award from Classic CD Magazine. Additional recordings feature music by Poulenc, Ravel, Moross, Shulamit Ran, Elinor Armer and John Luther Adams.

Ms. Falletta's radio and television credits include numerous appearances on Fresh Air, All Things Considered and From the Top, WQXR, WNCN, CBS Sunday Morning, the Charlie Rose Show, the MacNeil Lehrer News Hour, BBC Radio, and several nationally televised performances on PBS including Live from Lincoln Center-Juilliard at 80, Seasons of Life with Mark O'Connor and the BPO, and a special PBS TV documentary about music with Penn & Teller. As a writer, Ms. Falletta has contributed articles to Symphony Magazine, the New York Concert Review, the Virginian Pilot, Portfolio Magazine and Traffic East Magazine. A poem from Ms. Falletta's first poetry book, Love Letters to Music, is the text setting for a work by composer Paul English that premiered in 2012.
 
Ms. Falletta served as Principal Conductor of the Ulster Orchestra in Northern Ireland from 2011-14 where she made her debut at London's prestigious Proms with the orchestra and made five recordings with the orchestra for Naxos, including music of Gustav Holst, Ernest John Moeran and John Knowles Paine. She has held the positions of Artistic Advisor to the Honolulu Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of the Phoenix Symphony, Music Director of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra, Associate Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Denver Chamber Orchestra, the Queens Philharmonic and the Women's Philharmonic.
 
Ms. Falletta received her undergraduate degree from the Mannes College of Music, her master's and doctorate degrees from The Juilliard School, and in addition, has been awarded eleven honorary doctorates.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/JoAnn Falletta (7/12 - 8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with JOANN FALLETTA, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, the WYSO will perform Dvorak's "Symphony No. 9" and Berlioz's "Roman Carnival Overture."

JoAnn Falletta is internationally celebrated as a vibrant ambassador for music and an inspiring artistic leader. An effervescent and exuberant figure on the podium, she has been praised by The Washington Post as having "Toscanini's tight control over ensemble, Walter's affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowski's gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein." Acclaimed by The New York Times as "one of the finest conductors of her generation," she serves as the Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center.

Ms. Falletta is invited to guest conduct many of the world's finest orchestras. She has guest conducted over a hundred orchestras in North America, and many of the most prominent orchestras in Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. Her North America guest conducting appearances have included the orchestras of Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Seattle, San Diego, and the National Symphony as well as Montreal and Toronto. International appearances include the London Symphony, Liverpool and Manchester-BBC Philharmonics, Scottish BBC Orchestra, Czech and Rotterdam Philharmonics, Orchestra National de Lyon, Mannheim Orchestra and the Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra. Asian engagements include appearances with the Korean Broadcast Symphony, Seoul Philharmonic, China National Symphony and the Shanghai Symphony. Ms. Falletta's summer activities have taken her to numerous music festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, the Hollywood Bowl, Wolf Trap, Mann Center, Meadow Brook, OK Mozart Festival and the Grand Teton Festival.
 
Recent guest conducting highlights include her a European tour with the Stuttgart Orchestra, return engagements with the Belgrade Philharmonic (Serbia), the Warsaw, Krakow, Detroit, Phoenix, Puerto Rico and Hawaii Symphony Orchestras as well as debuts with the Gothenburg Symphony, the Orchestra of St. Luke's at Carnegie Hall, and a 13 city US tour with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and soloist James Galway.
 
Since stepping up to the podium as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in 1999, Maestro Falletta has been credited with bringing it to a new level of national and international prominence. During her tenure, the Orchestra's budget has grown by 25 percent and subscriptions have reached record levels. Under her direction, the BPO is continuing its trajectory as one of the most recorded orchestras in America. In addition to receiving two Grammy awards and six nominations, Falletta and the BPO have garnered numerous ASCAP awards, including the top award for Adventurous Programming in 2011, 2013 and 2014, two acclaimed Carnegie Hall performances in 2004 and 2013, two highly successful Florida tours, the establishment of the orchestra's own Beau Fleuve label, the founding of the JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition in partnership with WNED, and the national and international broadcast of BPO concerts on NPR's Performance Today, SymphonyCast, and the European Broadcasting Union. Other recent broadcasts include a national PBS televised special, Bernstein's Ode to Freedom featuring Ms. Falletta as host, and a PBS special of the Four Seasons with Mark O'Connor and Catherine Cho.
 
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra's 2015-16 Season celebrates the 75th anniversary of Kleinhans Music Hall, with major guest artists such as Lang Lang, Chris Botti and Andre Watts, and works showcasing the hall's exquisite acoustics. Recording highlights for the Buffalo Philharmonic's 2015-16 season include the release by Naxos of the music of Florent Schmitt, and Beau Fleuve releases of The Essential Sibelius in honor of his birthday and the BPO's Finland Celebration, and the Orchestra's first ever Children's CD, featuring Carnival of the Animals, Sorcerer's Apprentice and Mother Goose Suite. Recent releases on the BPO's own Beau Fleuve label include include Built for Buffalo, a disc featuring three works commissioned by the orchestra, Nordic Masters celebrating the 150th birthday of both Jean Sibelius and Carl Nielsen, and Live in Concert with works by Mozart, Dvořák, and Rachmaninoff. During the 2013-14 season, Naxos released Gliere's Symphony No.3, Tyberg's Symphony No.2, Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, and Beige, and Gershwin's Concerto in F, Rhapsody in Blue, Strike up the Band and Promenade.
 
Under Falletta's direction, the VSO has risen to celebrated artistic heights performing classics, pops and family concerts in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and Williamsburg and made critically acclaimed debuts at the Kennedy Center and New York's Carnegie Hall Highlights of the Virginia Symphony's 2015-16 season include a Beethoven Festival, and performances by violinist Sarah Chang, pianist Natasha Paremski and cellist Zuill Baile. JoAnn will also record three discs for the Naxos label with the Virginia Arts Festival; Mahler (arr. Schoenberg) The Song of the Earth, The Songs of a Wayfarer, and two discs of music of Stravinsky, The Soldier's Tale (complete) and Suite from The Soldier's Tale, Les Noces and Octet. The discs, expected to be released in early 2016, are part of a new recording agreement with Naxos.
 
Falletta is the recipient of many of the most prestigious conducting awards including the Seaver/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award for exceptionally gifted American conductors, the coveted Stokowski Competition and the Toscanini, Ditson and Bruno Walter Awards for conducting, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra League's prestigious John S. Edwards Award. She has introduced over 500 works by American composers, including 110 world premieres. Hailing her as a "leading force for the music of our time," the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers has honored JoAnn Falletta with twelve ASCAP awards, recognizing her work as a conductor, communicator, recording artist, audience builder, champion of American composers and distinguished musical citizen. Ms. Falletta served as a Member of the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.
 
Few artists are as important to the fabric of their communities as JoAnn Falletta. She was named Buffalo's Most Influential Civic Leader, Buffalo and Erie County's Artist of the Year, was inducted into the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, and was presented with the Chancellor Charles P. Norton Medal, the University of Buffalo's highest award. She received the Foundation for Jewish Philanthropies Award for outstanding leadership in the Marcel Tyberg Musical Legacy project. The JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition has brought international acclaim and attention to the classical guitar, the Buffalo region and the BPO. Falletta is a member of the Western New York Women's Hall of Fame, and received the Human Relations Award from the Buffalo/Niagara Chapter of the American Jewish Committee. In Virginia, she earned a star on Norfolk's Legends of Music Walk of Fame in recognition of her effect on the appreciation of classical music in Hampton Roads and Virginia, was named Norfolk's Downtowner of the Year and received the Virginia Women in History Award.
 
Falletta is a strong advocate and mentor for young professional and student musicians. She has led seminars for women conductors for the League of American Orchestras, established a unique collaboration between the BPO and Mannes College to give up-and-coming conductors professional experience with a leading American orchestra, and has great success working with young musicians, guest conducting the orchestras of many of the top conservatories, including Curtis, Juilliard, Mannes and The Manhattan School and summer programs at Interlochen, Round Top and Brevard, among others. In 2015, JoAnn will be one of the first conductors to work with the newly formed innovative, international educational orchestra created by Leon Botstein and Bard College.

In addition to the release of the two new Naxos discs by Falletta with the Buffalo Philharmonic, this season also saw a world premiere disc of music of Ken Fuchs with the London Symphony Orchestra and a second disc of the music of John Knowles Paine with the Ulster Orchestra. Her growing discography, which includes over 90 titles, consists of recordings with the Long Beach Symphony, Philadelphia Philharmonia, Women's Philharmonic, Netherlands Radio Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, English Chamber Orchestra, New Zealand Symphony, Czech National Symphony, among others. In addition to her double Grammy Award-winning Corigliano disc, her Grammy nominated discs include recordings with the Buffalo Philharmonic of Tyberg's Symphony No. 3, Corigliano's Red Violin, Schubert's Death and the Maiden, Strauss' Rosenkavalier, and Dohnanyi's Variations on a Nursery Song. In 2013, four of Falletta's Naxos discs with the London Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Virginia Symphony and Ulster Orchestra were Grammy nominated as part of the body of work by producer Tim Handley for Best Producer. She received her first Grammy nomination in 2006 for Fuch's Eventide Concerto for English Horn, Harp, Percussion, and String Orchestra, with the London Symphony, from the CD An American Place. Her recording of Gliere's Symphony No.3has received worldwide acclaim, including 5 stars and a top pick from BBC Music Magazine. The Washington Post selected her 2011 recording of piano music of Arvo Pärt as a top disc of the year. Her recording of Jack Gallagher's music with the London Symphony received five stars from BBC Music Magazine and Audiophile Audition, and was selected as a Best of 2010 by Minnesota Public Radio and listed among Fanfare Magazine's Want List for 2011. Discs of the music of Respighi and Griffes, both on the Naxos label with the Buffalo Philharmonic, were selected as Editor's Choice Recordings by Gramophone. Other recent Naxos discs include Joseph Suk's Fairy Tale, world premiere recordings of Daron Hagen's opera Shining Brow, based on the early years of Frank Lloyd Wright, and two "new" works by Franz Schubert, featuring the completion of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, and a newly orchestrated transcription of Death and the Maiden, her first recording with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra featuring the violin concertos of Dohnányi, the music of Paul Schoenfield with the Prague Philharmonia, the works of Aaron Copland with the BPO, and Borrowed Treasures, Ms Falletta's third disc of chamber music featuring her on guitar.
 
Earlier discs of note include Burchfield Gallery, with music by Morton Gould and Jean Sibelius (BPO), Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, Behzad Ranjbaran's Persian Trilogy with the London Symphony (Delos), The Music of Frederick Converse (Naxos) and Pictures at a Gallery by the Buffalo Philharmonic (Beau Fleuve), The American Clarinet, with the Czech National Symphony (Albany), Schubert's Guitar (Koch), featuring Ms. Falletta as guitarist and arranger, Impressions of French Music and Rhapsodie with the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Peter and the Wolf and the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, with the Virginia Symphony and celebrities from National Public Radio, released on the NPR label.
 
Ms. Falletta made three recordings of works by women composers with the Women's Philharmonic. Of special interest is her recording of works by Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Lili Boulanger and Germaine Tailleferre, which received a Best Classical Recording award from the National Association of Independent Record Distributors and a Most Creative Programming award from Classic CD Magazine. Additional recordings feature music by Poulenc, Ravel, Moross, Shulamit Ran, Elinor Armer and John Luther Adams.

Ms. Falletta's radio and television credits include numerous appearances on Fresh Air, All Things Considered and From the Top, WQXR, WNCN, CBS Sunday Morning, the Charlie Rose Show, the MacNeil Lehrer News Hour, BBC Radio, and several nationally televised performances on PBS including Live from Lincoln Center-Juilliard at 80, Seasons of Life with Mark O'Connor and the BPO, and a special PBS TV documentary about music with Penn & Teller. As a writer, Ms. Falletta has contributed articles to Symphony Magazine, the New York Concert Review, the Virginian Pilot, Portfolio Magazine and Traffic East Magazine. A poem from Ms. Falletta's first poetry book, Love Letters to Music, is the text setting for a work by composer Paul English that premiered in 2012.
 
Ms. Falletta served as Principal Conductor of the Ulster Orchestra in Northern Ireland from 2011-14 where she made her debut at London's prestigious Proms with the orchestra and made five recordings with the orchestra for Naxos, including music of Gustav Holst, Ernest John Moeran and John Knowles Paine. She has held the positions of Artistic Advisor to the Honolulu Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of the Phoenix Symphony, Music Director of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra, Associate Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Denver Chamber Orchestra, the Queens Philharmonic and the Women's Philharmonic.
 
Ms. Falletta received her undergraduate degree from the Mannes College of Music, her master's and doctorate degrees from The Juilliard School, and in addition, has been awarded eleven honorary doctorates.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/JoAnn Falletta (7/12 - 8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with JOANN FALLETTA, CONDUCTOR
The World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, the WYSO will perform Dvorak's "Symphony No. 9" and Berlioz's "Roman Carnival Overture."

JoAnn Falletta is internationally celebrated as a vibrant ambassador for music and an inspiring artistic leader. An effervescent and exuberant figure on the podium, she has been praised by The Washington Post as having "Toscanini's tight control over ensemble, Walter's affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowski's gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein." Acclaimed by The New York Times as "one of the finest conductors of her generation," she serves as the Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center.

Ms. Falletta is invited to guest conduct many of the world's finest orchestras. She has guest conducted over a hundred orchestras in North America, and many of the most prominent orchestras in Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. Her North America guest conducting appearances have included the orchestras of Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Seattle, San Diego, and the National Symphony as well as Montreal and Toronto. International appearances include the London Symphony, Liverpool and Manchester-BBC Philharmonics, Scottish BBC Orchestra, Czech and Rotterdam Philharmonics, Orchestra National de Lyon, Mannheim Orchestra and the Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra. Asian engagements include appearances with the Korean Broadcast Symphony, Seoul Philharmonic, China National Symphony and the Shanghai Symphony. Ms. Falletta's summer activities have taken her to numerous music festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, the Hollywood Bowl, Wolf Trap, Mann Center, Meadow Brook, OK Mozart Festival and the Grand Teton Festival.
 
Recent guest conducting highlights include her a European tour with the Stuttgart Orchestra, return engagements with the Belgrade Philharmonic (Serbia), the Warsaw, Krakow, Detroit, Phoenix, Puerto Rico and Hawaii Symphony Orchestras as well as debuts with the Gothenburg Symphony, the Orchestra of St. Luke's at Carnegie Hall, and a 13 city US tour with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and soloist James Galway.
 
Since stepping up to the podium as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in 1999, Maestro Falletta has been credited with bringing it to a new level of national and international prominence. During her tenure, the Orchestra's budget has grown by 25 percent and subscriptions have reached record levels. Under her direction, the BPO is continuing its trajectory as one of the most recorded orchestras in America. In addition to receiving two Grammy awards and six nominations, Falletta and the BPO have garnered numerous ASCAP awards, including the top award for Adventurous Programming in 2011, 2013 and 2014, two acclaimed Carnegie Hall performances in 2004 and 2013, two highly successful Florida tours, the establishment of the orchestra's own Beau Fleuve label, the founding of the JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition in partnership with WNED, and the national and international broadcast of BPO concerts on NPR's Performance Today, SymphonyCast, and the European Broadcasting Union. Other recent broadcasts include a national PBS televised special, Bernstein's Ode to Freedom featuring Ms. Falletta as host, and a PBS special of the Four Seasons with Mark O'Connor and Catherine Cho.
 
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra's 2015-16 Season celebrates the 75th anniversary of Kleinhans Music Hall, with major guest artists such as Lang Lang, Chris Botti and Andre Watts, and works showcasing the hall's exquisite acoustics. Recording highlights for the Buffalo Philharmonic's 2015-16 season include the release by Naxos of the music of Florent Schmitt, and Beau Fleuve releases of The Essential Sibelius in honor of his birthday and the BPO's Finland Celebration, and the Orchestra's first ever Children's CD, featuring Carnival of the Animals, Sorcerer's Apprentice and Mother Goose Suite. Recent releases on the BPO's own Beau Fleuve label include include Built for Buffalo, a disc featuring three works commissioned by the orchestra, Nordic Masters celebrating the 150th birthday of both Jean Sibelius and Carl Nielsen, and Live in Concert with works by Mozart, Dvořák, and Rachmaninoff. During the 2013-14 season, Naxos released Gliere's Symphony No.3, Tyberg's Symphony No.2, Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, and Beige, and Gershwin's Concerto in F, Rhapsody in Blue, Strike up the Band and Promenade.
 
Under Falletta's direction, the VSO has risen to celebrated artistic heights performing classics, pops and family concerts in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and Williamsburg and made critically acclaimed debuts at the Kennedy Center and New York's Carnegie Hall Highlights of the Virginia Symphony's 2015-16 season include a Beethoven Festival, and performances by violinist Sarah Chang, pianist Natasha Paremski and cellist Zuill Baile. JoAnn will also record three discs for the Naxos label with the Virginia Arts Festival; Mahler (arr. Schoenberg) The Song of the Earth, The Songs of a Wayfarer, and two discs of music of Stravinsky, The Soldier's Tale (complete) and Suite from The Soldier's Tale, Les Noces and Octet. The discs, expected to be released in early 2016, are part of a new recording agreement with Naxos.
 
Falletta is the recipient of many of the most prestigious conducting awards including the Seaver/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award for exceptionally gifted American conductors, the coveted Stokowski Competition and the Toscanini, Ditson and Bruno Walter Awards for conducting, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra League's prestigious John S. Edwards Award. She has introduced over 500 works by American composers, including 110 world premieres. Hailing her as a "leading force for the music of our time," the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers has honored JoAnn Falletta with twelve ASCAP awards, recognizing her work as a conductor, communicator, recording artist, audience builder, champion of American composers and distinguished musical citizen. Ms. Falletta served as a Member of the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.
 
Few artists are as important to the fabric of their communities as JoAnn Falletta. She was named Buffalo's Most Influential Civic Leader, Buffalo and Erie County's Artist of the Year, was inducted into the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, and was presented with the Chancellor Charles P. Norton Medal, the University of Buffalo's highest award. She received the Foundation for Jewish Philanthropies Award for outstanding leadership in the Marcel Tyberg Musical Legacy project. The JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition has brought international acclaim and attention to the classical guitar, the Buffalo region and the BPO. Falletta is a member of the Western New York Women's Hall of Fame, and received the Human Relations Award from the Buffalo/Niagara Chapter of the American Jewish Committee. In Virginia, she earned a star on Norfolk's Legends of Music Walk of Fame in recognition of her effect on the appreciation of classical music in Hampton Roads and Virginia, was named Norfolk's Downtowner of the Year and received the Virginia Women in History Award.
 
Falletta is a strong advocate and mentor for young professional and student musicians. She has led seminars for women conductors for the League of American Orchestras, established a unique collaboration between the BPO and Mannes College to give up-and-coming conductors professional experience with a leading American orchestra, and has great success working with young musicians, guest conducting the orchestras of many of the top conservatories, including Curtis, Juilliard, Mannes and The Manhattan School and summer programs at Interlochen, Round Top and Brevard, among others. In 2015, JoAnn will be one of the first conductors to work with the newly formed innovative, international educational orchestra created by Leon Botstein and Bard College.

In addition to the release of the two new Naxos discs by Falletta with the Buffalo Philharmonic, this season also saw a world premiere disc of music of Ken Fuchs with the London Symphony Orchestra and a second disc of the music of John Knowles Paine with the Ulster Orchestra. Her growing discography, which includes over 90 titles, consists of recordings with the Long Beach Symphony, Philadelphia Philharmonia, Women's Philharmonic, Netherlands Radio Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, English Chamber Orchestra, New Zealand Symphony, Czech National Symphony, among others. In addition to her double Grammy Award-winning Corigliano disc, her Grammy nominated discs include recordings with the Buffalo Philharmonic of Tyberg's Symphony No. 3, Corigliano's Red Violin, Schubert's Death and the Maiden, Strauss' Rosenkavalier, and Dohnanyi's Variations on a Nursery Song. In 2013, four of Falletta's Naxos discs with the London Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Virginia Symphony and Ulster Orchestra were Grammy nominated as part of the body of work by producer Tim Handley for Best Producer. She received her first Grammy nomination in 2006 for Fuch's Eventide Concerto for English Horn, Harp, Percussion, and String Orchestra, with the London Symphony, from the CD An American Place. Her recording of Gliere's Symphony No.3has received worldwide acclaim, including 5 stars and a top pick from BBC Music Magazine. The Washington Post selected her 2011 recording of piano music of Arvo Pärt as a top disc of the year. Her recording of Jack Gallagher's music with the London Symphony received five stars from BBC Music Magazine and Audiophile Audition, and was selected as a Best of 2010 by Minnesota Public Radio and listed among Fanfare Magazine's Want List for 2011. Discs of the music of Respighi and Griffes, both on the Naxos label with the Buffalo Philharmonic, were selected as Editor's Choice Recordings by Gramophone. Other recent Naxos discs include Joseph Suk's Fairy Tale, world premiere recordings of Daron Hagen's opera Shining Brow, based on the early years of Frank Lloyd Wright, and two "new" works by Franz Schubert, featuring the completion of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, and a newly orchestrated transcription of Death and the Maiden, her first recording with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra featuring the violin concertos of Dohnányi, the music of Paul Schoenfield with the Prague Philharmonia, the works of Aaron Copland with the BPO, and Borrowed Treasures, Ms Falletta's third disc of chamber music featuring her on guitar.
 
Earlier discs of note include Burchfield Gallery, with music by Morton Gould and Jean Sibelius (BPO), Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, Behzad Ranjbaran's Persian Trilogy with the London Symphony (Delos), The Music of Frederick Converse (Naxos) and Pictures at a Gallery by the Buffalo Philharmonic (Beau Fleuve), The American Clarinet, with the Czech National Symphony (Albany), Schubert's Guitar (Koch), featuring Ms. Falletta as guitarist and arranger, Impressions of French Music and Rhapsodie with the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Peter and the Wolf and the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, with the Virginia Symphony and celebrities from National Public Radio, released on the NPR label.
 
Ms. Falletta made three recordings of works by women composers with the Women's Philharmonic. Of special interest is her recording of works by Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Lili Boulanger and Germaine Tailleferre, which received a Best Classical Recording award from the National Association of Independent Record Distributors and a Most Creative Programming award from Classic CD Magazine. Additional recordings feature music by Poulenc, Ravel, Moross, Shulamit Ran, Elinor Armer and John Luther Adams.

Ms. Falletta's radio and television credits include numerous appearances on Fresh Air, All Things Considered and From the Top, WQXR, WNCN, CBS Sunday Morning, the Charlie Rose Show, the MacNeil Lehrer News Hour, BBC Radio, and several nationally televised performances on PBS including Live from Lincoln Center-Juilliard at 80, Seasons of Life with Mark O'Connor and the BPO, and a special PBS TV documentary about music with Penn & Teller. As a writer, Ms. Falletta has contributed articles to Symphony Magazine, the New York Concert Review, the Virginian Pilot, Portfolio Magazine and Traffic East Magazine. A poem from Ms. Falletta's first poetry book, Love Letters to Music, is the text setting for a work by composer Paul English that premiered in 2012.
 
Ms. Falletta served as Principal Conductor of the Ulster Orchestra in Northern Ireland from 2011-14 where she made her debut at London's prestigious Proms with the orchestra and made five recordings with the orchestra for Naxos, including music of Gustav Holst, Ernest John Moeran and John Knowles Paine. She has held the positions of Artistic Advisor to the Honolulu Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of the Phoenix Symphony, Music Director of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra, Associate Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Denver Chamber Orchestra, the Queens Philharmonic and the Women's Philharmonic.
 
Ms. Falletta received her undergraduate degree from the Mannes College of Music, her master's and doctorate degrees from The Juilliard School, and in addition, has been awarded eleven honorary doctorates.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/JoAnn Falletta (7/12 - 8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with JOANN FALLETTA, CONDUCTORThe World Youth Symphony Orchestra is the oldest and most prestigious international youth orchestra in the country. Under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, the WYSO will perform Dvorak's "Symphony No. 9" and Berlioz's "Roman Carnival Overture."

JoAnn Falletta is internationally celebrated as a vibrant ambassador for music and an inspiring artistic leader. An effervescent and exuberant figure on the podium, she has been praised by The Washington Post as having "Toscanini's tight control over ensemble, Walter's affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowski's gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein." Acclaimed by The New York Times as "one of the finest conductors of her generation," she serves as the Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center.

Ms. Falletta is invited to guest conduct many of the world's finest orchestras. She has guest conducted over a hundred orchestras in North America, and many of the most prominent orchestras in Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. Her North America guest conducting appearances have included the orchestras of Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Seattle, San Diego, and the National Symphony as well as Montreal and Toronto. International appearances include the London Symphony, Liverpool and Manchester-BBC Philharmonics, Scottish BBC Orchestra, Czech and Rotterdam Philharmonics, Orchestra National de Lyon, Mannheim Orchestra and the Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra. Asian engagements include appearances with the Korean Broadcast Symphony, Seoul Philharmonic, China National Symphony and the Shanghai Symphony. Ms. Falletta's summer activities have taken her to numerous music festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, the Hollywood Bowl, Wolf Trap, Mann Center, Meadow Brook, OK Mozart Festival and the Grand Teton Festival.
 
Recent guest conducting highlights include her a European tour with the Stuttgart Orchestra, return engagements with the Belgrade Philharmonic (Serbia), the Warsaw, Krakow, Detroit, Phoenix, Puerto Rico and Hawaii Symphony Orchestras as well as debuts with the Gothenburg Symphony, the Orchestra of St. Luke's at Carnegie Hall, and a 13 city US tour with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and soloist James Galway.
 
Since stepping up to the podium as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in 1999, Maestro Falletta has been credited with bringing it to a new level of national and international prominence. During her tenure, the Orchestra's budget has grown by 25 percent and subscriptions have reached record levels. Under her direction, the BPO is continuing its trajectory as one of the most recorded orchestras in America. In addition to receiving two Grammy awards and six nominations, Falletta and the BPO have garnered numerous ASCAP awards, including the top award for Adventurous Programming in 2011, 2013 and 2014, two acclaimed Carnegie Hall performances in 2004 and 2013, two highly successful Florida tours, the establishment of the orchestra's own Beau Fleuve label, the founding of the JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition in partnership with WNED, and the national and international broadcast of BPO concerts on NPR's Performance Today, SymphonyCast, and the European Broadcasting Union. Other recent broadcasts include a national PBS televised special, Bernstein's Ode to Freedom featuring Ms. Falletta as host, and a PBS special of the Four Seasons with Mark O'Connor and Catherine Cho.
 
The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra's 2015-16 Season celebrates the 75th anniversary of Kleinhans Music Hall, with major guest artists such as Lang Lang, Chris Botti and Andre Watts, and works showcasing the hall's exquisite acoustics. Recording highlights for the Buffalo Philharmonic's 2015-16 season include the release by Naxos of the music of Florent Schmitt, and Beau Fleuve releases of The Essential Sibelius in honor of his birthday and the BPO's Finland Celebration, and the Orchestra's first ever Children's CD, featuring Carnival of the Animals, Sorcerer's Apprentice and Mother Goose Suite. Recent releases on the BPO's own Beau Fleuve label include include Built for Buffalo, a disc featuring three works commissioned by the orchestra, Nordic Masters celebrating the 150th birthday of both Jean Sibelius and Carl Nielsen, and Live in Concert with works by Mozart, Dvořák, and Rachmaninoff. During the 2013-14 season, Naxos released Gliere's Symphony No.3, Tyberg's Symphony No.2, Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, and Beige, and Gershwin's Concerto in F, Rhapsody in Blue, Strike up the Band and Promenade.
 
Under Falletta's direction, the VSO has risen to celebrated artistic heights performing classics, pops and family concerts in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and Williamsburg and made critically acclaimed debuts at the Kennedy Center and New York's Carnegie Hall Highlights of the Virginia Symphony's 2015-16 season include a Beethoven Festival, and performances by violinist Sarah Chang, pianist Natasha Paremski and cellist Zuill Baile. JoAnn will also record three discs for the Naxos label with the Virginia Arts Festival; Mahler (arr. Schoenberg) The Song of the Earth, The Songs of a Wayfarer, and two discs of music of Stravinsky, The Soldier's Tale (complete) and Suite from The Soldier's Tale, Les Noces and Octet. The discs, expected to be released in early 2016, are part of a new recording agreement with Naxos.
 
Falletta is the recipient of many of the most prestigious conducting awards including the Seaver/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award for exceptionally gifted American conductors, the coveted Stokowski Competition and the Toscanini, Ditson and Bruno Walter Awards for conducting, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra League's prestigious John S. Edwards Award. She has introduced over 500 works by American composers, including 110 world premieres. Hailing her as a "leading force for the music of our time," the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers has honored JoAnn Falletta with twelve ASCAP awards, recognizing her work as a conductor, communicator, recording artist, audience builder, champion of American composers and distinguished musical citizen. Ms. Falletta served as a Member of the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.
 
Few artists are as important to the fabric of their communities as JoAnn Falletta. She was named Buffalo's Most Influential Civic Leader, Buffalo and Erie County's Artist of the Year, was inducted into the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, and was presented with the Chancellor Charles P. Norton Medal, the University of Buffalo's highest award. She received the Foundation for Jewish Philanthropies Award for outstanding leadership in the Marcel Tyberg Musical Legacy project. The JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition has brought international acclaim and attention to the classical guitar, the Buffalo region and the BPO. Falletta is a member of the Western New York Women's Hall of Fame, and received the Human Relations Award from the Buffalo/Niagara Chapter of the American Jewish Committee. In Virginia, she earned a star on Norfolk's Legends of Music Walk of Fame in recognition of her effect on the appreciation of classical music in Hampton Roads and Virginia, was named Norfolk's Downtowner of the Year and received the Virginia Women in History Award.
 
Falletta is a strong advocate and mentor for young professional and student musicians. She has led seminars for women conductors for the League of American Orchestras, established a unique collaboration between the BPO and Mannes College to give up-and-coming conductors professional experience with a leading American orchestra, and has great success working with young musicians, guest conducting the orchestras of many of the top conservatories, including Curtis, Juilliard, Mannes and The Manhattan School and summer programs at Interlochen, Round Top and Brevard, among others. In 2015, JoAnn will be one of the first conductors to work with the newly formed innovative, international educational orchestra created by Leon Botstein and Bard College.

In addition to the release of the two new Naxos discs by Falletta with the Buffalo Philharmonic, this season also saw a world premiere disc of music of Ken Fuchs with the London Symphony Orchestra and a second disc of the music of John Knowles Paine with the Ulster Orchestra. Her growing discography, which includes over 90 titles, consists of recordings with the Long Beach Symphony, Philadelphia Philharmonia, Women's Philharmonic, Netherlands Radio Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, English Chamber Orchestra, New Zealand Symphony, Czech National Symphony, among others. In addition to her double Grammy Award-winning Corigliano disc, her Grammy nominated discs include recordings with the Buffalo Philharmonic of Tyberg's Symphony No. 3, Corigliano's Red Violin, Schubert's Death and the Maiden, Strauss' Rosenkavalier, and Dohnanyi's Variations on a Nursery Song. In 2013, four of Falletta's Naxos discs with the London Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Virginia Symphony and Ulster Orchestra were Grammy nominated as part of the body of work by producer Tim Handley for Best Producer. She received her first Grammy nomination in 2006 for Fuch's Eventide Concerto for English Horn, Harp, Percussion, and String Orchestra, with the London Symphony, from the CD An American Place. Her recording of Gliere's Symphony No.3has received worldwide acclaim, including 5 stars and a top pick from BBC Music Magazine. The Washington Post selected her 2011 recording of piano music of Arvo Pärt as a top disc of the year. Her recording of Jack Gallagher's music with the London Symphony received five stars from BBC Music Magazine and Audiophile Audition, and was selected as a Best of 2010 by Minnesota Public Radio and listed among Fanfare Magazine's Want List for 2011. Discs of the music of Respighi and Griffes, both on the Naxos label with the Buffalo Philharmonic, were selected as Editor's Choice Recordings by Gramophone. Other recent Naxos discs include Joseph Suk's Fairy Tale, world premiere recordings of Daron Hagen's opera Shining Brow, based on the early years of Frank Lloyd Wright, and two "new" works by Franz Schubert, featuring the completion of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, and a newly orchestrated transcription of Death and the Maiden, her first recording with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra featuring the violin concertos of Dohnányi, the music of Paul Schoenfield with the Prague Philharmonia, the works of Aaron Copland with the BPO, and Borrowed Treasures, Ms Falletta's third disc of chamber music featuring her on guitar.
 
Earlier discs of note include Burchfield Gallery, with music by Morton Gould and Jean Sibelius (BPO), Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, Behzad Ranjbaran's Persian Trilogy with the London Symphony (Delos), The Music of Frederick Converse (Naxos) and Pictures at a Gallery by the Buffalo Philharmonic (Beau Fleuve), The American Clarinet, with the Czech National Symphony (Albany), Schubert's Guitar (Koch), featuring Ms. Falletta as guitarist and arranger, Impressions of French Music and Rhapsodie with the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Peter and the Wolf and the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, with the Virginia Symphony and celebrities from National Public Radio, released on the NPR label.
 
Ms. Falletta made three recordings of works by women composers with the Women's Philharmonic. Of special interest is her recording of works by Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Lili Boulanger and Germaine Tailleferre, which received a Best Classical Recording award from the National Association of Independent Record Distributors and a Most Creative Programming award from Classic CD Magazine. Additional recordings feature music by Poulenc, Ravel, Moross, Shulamit Ran, Elinor Armer and John Luther Adams.

Ms. Falletta's radio and television credits include numerous appearances on Fresh Air, All Things Considered and From the Top, WQXR, WNCN, CBS Sunday Morning, the Charlie Rose Show, the MacNeil Lehrer News Hour, BBC Radio, and several nationally televised performances on PBS including Live from Lincoln Center-Juilliard at 80, Seasons of Life with Mark O'Connor and the BPO, and a special PBS TV documentary about music with Penn & Teller. As a writer, Ms. Falletta has contributed articles to Symphony Magazine, the New York Concert Review, the Virginian Pilot, Portfolio Magazine and Traffic East Magazine. A poem from Ms. Falletta's first poetry book, Love Letters to Music, is the text setting for a work by composer Paul English that premiered in 2012.
 
Ms. Falletta served as Principal Conductor of the Ulster Orchestra in Northern Ireland from 2011-14 where she made her debut at London's prestigious Proms with the orchestra and made five recordings with the orchestra for Naxos, including music of Gustav Holst, Ernest John Moeran and John Knowles Paine. She has held the positions of Artistic Advisor to the Honolulu Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of the Phoenix Symphony, Music Director of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra, Associate Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Denver Chamber Orchestra, the Queens Philharmonic and the Women's Philharmonic.
 
Ms. Falletta received her undergraduate degree from the Mannes College of Music, her master's and doctorate degrees from The Juilliard School, and in addition, has been awarded eleven honorary doctorates.

7/12/2015 7/12/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYWS - 7/11 (7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/11/2015 7/11/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYWS - 7/18 (7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/18/2015 7/18/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYWS - 7/25 (7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

7/25/2015 7/25/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  

Summer Concerts: AUGUST/SEPT 2015

Activity Start Date End Date Status  
"The Tender Land" (8/1 - 8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

"The Tender Land”
Music: Aaron Copland
Libretto: Horace Everett
Conductor, James Bagwell

"The Tender Land" was composed in 1953 on a commission from Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II and received its premiere on April 1, 1954 at the City Center in New York. Concerning a girl transformed into a young woman by her first experience of love, "The Tender Land" is set in the American Midwest during the 1930s.

The libretto by Horace Everett (a pseudonym of Erik Johns) was inspired by photographs taken by Walker Evans of a rural, Depression-era mother and her daughter that had appeared in James Agee's book "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men."

The music is cut from the same cloth as that of "Appalachian Spring"—the melodic, easygoing, folkish vein that Copland could manage about as easily as breathing. Lightly scored (calling for winds and brass in twos) and with spoken dialogue in the style of the musical stage, the score has come to be regarded as one of Copland's finest, as he himself believed it to be.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Dancing with the Stars - Live! (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

DANCING WITH THE STARS - LIVE!
Kicking off this summer, "Dancing with the Stars: Live!" features the faces you know and love including pro dancers Witney Carson, Valentin Chmerkovskiy, Artem Chigvintsev, Peta Murgatroyd, Emma Slater, and troupe dancers Alan Bersten, Brittany Cherry, Sasha Farber and Jenna Johnson. The dancers are unleashed in the 90-minute action packed live show, produced by Faculty Productions in association with BBC Worldwide, treating audiences to exciting and romantic performances, from choreography never before seen on the show, to some of the most memorable numbers from all ten years of "Dancing with the Stars."

8/10/2015 8/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Dancing with the Stars - Live! (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

DANCING WITH THE STARS - LIVE!
Kicking off this summer, "Dancing with the Stars: Live!" features the faces you know and love including pro dancers Witney Carson, Valentin Chmerkovskiy, Artem Chigvintsev, Peta Murgatroyd, Emma Slater, and troupe dancers Alan Bersten, Brittany Cherry, Sasha Farber and Jenna Johnson. The dancers are unleashed in the 90-minute action packed live show, produced by Faculty Productions in association with BBC Worldwide, treating audiences to exciting and romantic performances, from choreography never before seen on the show, to some of the most memorable numbers from all ten years of "Dancing with the Stars."

8/10/2015 8/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Dancing with the Stars - Live! (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

DANCING WITH THE STARS - LIVE!
Kicking off this summer, "Dancing with the Stars: Live!" features the faces you know and love including pro dancers Witney Carson, Valentin Chmerkovskiy, Artem Chigvintsev, Peta Murgatroyd, Emma Slater, and troupe dancers Alan Bersten, Brittany Cherry, Sasha Farber and Jenna Johnson. The dancers are unleashed in the 90-minute action packed live show, produced by Faculty Productions in association with BBC Worldwide, treating audiences to exciting and romantic performances, from choreography never before seen on the show, to some of the most memorable numbers from all ten years of "Dancing with the Stars."

8/10/2015 8/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Dancing with the Stars - Live! (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

DANCING WITH THE STARS - LIVE!
Kicking off this summer, "Dancing with the Stars: Live!" features the faces you know and love including pro dancers Witney Carson, Valentin Chmerkovskiy, Artem Chigvintsev, Peta Murgatroyd, Emma Slater, and troupe dancers Alan Bersten, Brittany Cherry, Sasha Farber and Jenna Johnson. The dancers are unleashed in the 90-minute action packed live show, produced by Faculty Productions in association with BBC Worldwide, treating audiences to exciting and romantic performances, from choreography never before seen on the show, to some of the most memorable numbers from all ten years of "Dancing with the Stars."

8/10/2015 8/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Dancing with the Stars - Live! (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

DANCING WITH THE STARS - LIVE!
Kicking off this summer, "Dancing with the Stars: Live!" features the faces you know and love including pro dancers Witney Carson, Valentin Chmerkovskiy, Artem Chigvintsev, Peta Murgatroyd, Emma Slater, and troupe dancers Alan Bersten, Brittany Cherry, Sasha Farber and Jenna Johnson. The dancers are unleashed in the 90-minute action packed live show, produced by Faculty Productions in association with BBC Worldwide, treating audiences to exciting and romantic performances, from choreography never before seen on the show, to some of the most memorable numbers from all ten years of "Dancing with the Stars."

8/10/2015 8/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Dancing with the Stars - Live! (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

DANCING WITH THE STARS - LIVE!
Kicking off this summer, "Dancing with the Stars: Live!" features the faces you know and love including pro dancers Witney Carson, Valentin Chmerkovskiy, Artem Chigvintsev, Peta Murgatroyd, Emma Slater, and troupe dancers Alan Bersten, Brittany Cherry, Sasha Farber and Jenna Johnson. The dancers are unleashed in the 90-minute action packed live show, produced by Faculty Productions in association with BBC Worldwide, treating audiences to exciting and romantic performances, from choreography never before seen on the show, to some of the most memorable numbers from all ten years of "Dancing with the Stars."

8/10/2015 8/10/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Diana Krall (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

DIANA KRALL
Diana Krall is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer known for her outstanding contralto vocals. She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. In 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time.

Krall is the only jazz singer to have eight albums debuting at the top of the Billboard Jazz Albums. To date, she has won five Grammy Awards and eight Juno Awards. She has also earned nine gold, three platinum, and seven multi-platinum albums.

By any standard, this five-time Grammy®  winning jazz pianist and vocalist is one of the most accomplished and distinctive musicians in the world today. Respected far and wide as a wildly successful recording and performing artist, Krall remains a true musical force. At any given moment she could be producing Barbra Streisand's new album, serving as musical director and arranger for Paul McCartney or hitting the road for a good cause with Neil Young. As the record shows, Diana Krall has already done all that and much more. Along the way Krall has sold more albums than any other female jazz artist of the last 30 years, establishing herself as one of the best-selling and most beloved performers of her generation, one whose recordings thus far have earned her nine gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum albums.

On Wallflower, Krall's stunning and surprising new album for Verve Records, this world-class player has consciously chosen to hand over a little control to sixteen-time Grammy® winning producer David Foster in order, once again, to do something unexpected. On the new album she has recorded a collection of songs from the sixties to present day, showcasing her considerable gifts as a vocalist in a bold and beautiful way. Krall sings a set of songs that include familiar popular classics like The Mamas and the Papas' "California Dreaming" and the Eagles' "Desperado," favorite vintage songs by Krall's musical heroes Bob Dylan (he inspired the album's title track "Wallflower") and Elton John ("Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word"). The album also features more recent gems like Crowded House's "Don't Dream It's Over" and a wonderful new composition from Paul McCartney ("If I Take You Home Tonight").  Recorded in Los Angeles and New York, Wallflower is a tremendously refreshing and collaborative effort that reflects Krall in a gorgeous new light. 

"A lot of the songs on Wallflower are ones I grew up loving on the radio and on vinyl, songs I heard at home. These are songs I've been singing to myself for years. I just needed the lyric sheet to make sure I wasn't singing the wrong words all this time. I got the 45 for "I'm Not In Love" by 10cc. I listened to Bryan Adams all the time. My parents and I both loved Linda Ronstadt, who was my inspiration to sing 'Desperado.' I even had a Peter Frampton poster on the wall. I was just a typical teenager hanging out with friends, not just listening to jazz. When Krall hears "Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word," she can still remember the musical Christmas gift that keeps on giving, a prized copy of her hero and mentor Elton John's album Blue Moves. "My biggest influence beside Oscar Peterson is Elton John," Krall says. "I have a picture somewhere of Christmas morning when Elton's Blue Moves album came out. I wanted that album so badly. The photo is of me when I was 16 with my mom and my dad holding that album. I used to listen to it downstairs on my record player. I had a Rhodes down there so I could play along.  Over the years, Elton has become like family. A while back we sang 'Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word' together on my husband Elvis Costello's TV show Spectacle. So many Elton songs mean so much to me but that one in particular is special."
Wallflower's title track is a relatively unknown Bob Dylan composition that has become a personal favorite of Krall's.

"I love Bob Dylan like crazy," says Krall. "I've only met him a few times. I told him I love the way he plays piano. He said, 'Well, you're a piano player, so you should know.' Dylan's music runs so deep. From the moment I heard the demo version of "Wallflower" with Bob singing his song along with a dog barking in the background, I have loved this song. I've been performing 'Wallflower' for a year and a half now with my band and I just had to record it here." "Wallflower" is a standout track featuring one of Krall's most affecting vocals ever and some outstanding guitar work from acclaimed guitarist Blake Mills. "This is a song that I feel very connected to," Krall explains. "I'm a bit of a method actor and 'Wallflower' is a part I really wanted to play.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Diana Krall (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

DIANA KRALL
Diana Krall is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer known for her outstanding contralto vocals. She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. In 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time.

Krall is the only jazz singer to have eight albums debuting at the top of the Billboard Jazz Albums. To date, she has won five Grammy Awards and eight Juno Awards. She has also earned nine gold, three platinum, and seven multi-platinum albums.

By any standard, this five-time Grammy®  winning jazz pianist and vocalist is one of the most accomplished and distinctive musicians in the world today. Respected far and wide as a wildly successful recording and performing artist, Krall remains a true musical force. At any given moment she could be producing Barbra Streisand's new album, serving as musical director and arranger for Paul McCartney or hitting the road for a good cause with Neil Young. As the record shows, Diana Krall has already done all that and much more. Along the way Krall has sold more albums than any other female jazz artist of the last 30 years, establishing herself as one of the best-selling and most beloved performers of her generation, one whose recordings thus far have earned her nine gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum albums.

On Wallflower, Krall's stunning and surprising new album for Verve Records, this world-class player has consciously chosen to hand over a little control to sixteen-time Grammy® winning producer David Foster in order, once again, to do something unexpected. On the new album she has recorded a collection of songs from the sixties to present day, showcasing her considerable gifts as a vocalist in a bold and beautiful way. Krall sings a set of songs that include familiar popular classics like The Mamas and the Papas' "California Dreaming" and the Eagles' "Desperado," favorite vintage songs by Krall's musical heroes Bob Dylan (he inspired the album's title track "Wallflower") and Elton John ("Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word"). The album also features more recent gems like Crowded House's "Don't Dream It's Over" and a wonderful new composition from Paul McCartney ("If I Take You Home Tonight").  Recorded in Los Angeles and New York, Wallflower is a tremendously refreshing and collaborative effort that reflects Krall in a gorgeous new light. 

"A lot of the songs on Wallflower are ones I grew up loving on the radio and on vinyl, songs I heard at home. These are songs I've been singing to myself for years. I just needed the lyric sheet to make sure I wasn't singing the wrong words all this time. I got the 45 for "I'm Not In Love" by 10cc. I listened to Bryan Adams all the time. My parents and I both loved Linda Ronstadt, who was my inspiration to sing 'Desperado.' I even had a Peter Frampton poster on the wall. I was just a typical teenager hanging out with friends, not just listening to jazz. When Krall hears "Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word," she can still remember the musical Christmas gift that keeps on giving, a prized copy of her hero and mentor Elton John's album Blue Moves. "My biggest influence beside Oscar Peterson is Elton John," Krall says. "I have a picture somewhere of Christmas morning when Elton's Blue Moves album came out. I wanted that album so badly. The photo is of me when I was 16 with my mom and my dad holding that album. I used to listen to it downstairs on my record player. I had a Rhodes down there so I could play along.  Over the years, Elton has become like family. A while back we sang 'Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word' together on my husband Elvis Costello's TV show Spectacle. So many Elton songs mean so much to me but that one in particular is special."
Wallflower's title track is a relatively unknown Bob Dylan composition that has become a personal favorite of Krall's.

"I love Bob Dylan like crazy," says Krall. "I've only met him a few times. I told him I love the way he plays piano. He said, 'Well, you're a piano player, so you should know.' Dylan's music runs so deep. From the moment I heard the demo version of "Wallflower" with Bob singing his song along with a dog barking in the background, I have loved this song. I've been performing 'Wallflower' for a year and a half now with my band and I just had to record it here." "Wallflower" is a standout track featuring one of Krall's most affecting vocals ever and some outstanding guitar work from acclaimed guitarist Blake Mills. "This is a song that I feel very connected to," Krall explains. "I'm a bit of a method actor and 'Wallflower' is a part I really wanted to play.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Diana Krall (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

DIANA KRALL
Diana Krall is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer known for her outstanding contralto vocals. She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. In 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time.

Krall is the only jazz singer to have eight albums debuting at the top of the Billboard Jazz Albums. To date, she has won five Grammy Awards and eight Juno Awards. She has also earned nine gold, three platinum, and seven multi-platinum albums.

By any standard, this five-time Grammy®  winning jazz pianist and vocalist is one of the most accomplished and distinctive musicians in the world today. Respected far and wide as a wildly successful recording and performing artist, Krall remains a true musical force. At any given moment she could be producing Barbra Streisand's new album, serving as musical director and arranger for Paul McCartney or hitting the road for a good cause with Neil Young. As the record shows, Diana Krall has already done all that and much more. Along the way Krall has sold more albums than any other female jazz artist of the last 30 years, establishing herself as one of the best-selling and most beloved performers of her generation, one whose recordings thus far have earned her nine gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum albums.

On Wallflower, Krall's stunning and surprising new album for Verve Records, this world-class player has consciously chosen to hand over a little control to sixteen-time Grammy® winning producer David Foster in order, once again, to do something unexpected. On the new album she has recorded a collection of songs from the sixties to present day, showcasing her considerable gifts as a vocalist in a bold and beautiful way. Krall sings a set of songs that include familiar popular classics like The Mamas and the Papas' "California Dreaming" and the Eagles' "Desperado," favorite vintage songs by Krall's musical heroes Bob Dylan (he inspired the album's title track "Wallflower") and Elton John ("Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word"). The album also features more recent gems like Crowded House's "Don't Dream It's Over" and a wonderful new composition from Paul McCartney ("If I Take You Home Tonight").  Recorded in Los Angeles and New York, Wallflower is a tremendously refreshing and collaborative effort that reflects Krall in a gorgeous new light. 

"A lot of the songs on Wallflower are ones I grew up loving on the radio and on vinyl, songs I heard at home. These are songs I've been singing to myself for years. I just needed the lyric sheet to make sure I wasn't singing the wrong words all this time. I got the 45 for "I'm Not In Love" by 10cc. I listened to Bryan Adams all the time. My parents and I both loved Linda Ronstadt, who was my inspiration to sing 'Desperado.' I even had a Peter Frampton poster on the wall. I was just a typical teenager hanging out with friends, not just listening to jazz. When Krall hears "Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word," she can still remember the musical Christmas gift that keeps on giving, a prized copy of her hero and mentor Elton John's album Blue Moves. "My biggest influence beside Oscar Peterson is Elton John," Krall says. "I have a picture somewhere of Christmas morning when Elton's Blue Moves album came out. I wanted that album so badly. The photo is of me when I was 16 with my mom and my dad holding that album. I used to listen to it downstairs on my record player. I had a Rhodes down there so I could play along.  Over the years, Elton has become like family. A while back we sang 'Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word' together on my husband Elvis Costello's TV show Spectacle. So many Elton songs mean so much to me but that one in particular is special."
Wallflower's title track is a relatively unknown Bob Dylan composition that has become a personal favorite of Krall's.

"I love Bob Dylan like crazy," says Krall. "I've only met him a few times. I told him I love the way he plays piano. He said, 'Well, you're a piano player, so you should know.' Dylan's music runs so deep. From the moment I heard the demo version of "Wallflower" with Bob singing his song along with a dog barking in the background, I have loved this song. I've been performing 'Wallflower' for a year and a half now with my band and I just had to record it here." "Wallflower" is a standout track featuring one of Krall's most affecting vocals ever and some outstanding guitar work from acclaimed guitarist Blake Mills. "This is a song that I feel very connected to," Krall explains. "I'm a bit of a method actor and 'Wallflower' is a part I really wanted to play.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Diana Krall (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

DIANA KRALL
Diana Krall is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer known for her outstanding contralto vocals. She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. In 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time.

Krall is the only jazz singer to have eight albums debuting at the top of the Billboard Jazz Albums. To date, she has won five Grammy Awards and eight Juno Awards. She has also earned nine gold, three platinum, and seven multi-platinum albums.

By any standard, this five-time Grammy®  winning jazz pianist and vocalist is one of the most accomplished and distinctive musicians in the world today. Respected far and wide as a wildly successful recording and performing artist, Krall remains a true musical force. At any given moment she could be producing Barbra Streisand's new album, serving as musical director and arranger for Paul McCartney or hitting the road for a good cause with Neil Young. As the record shows, Diana Krall has already done all that and much more. Along the way Krall has sold more albums than any other female jazz artist of the last 30 years, establishing herself as one of the best-selling and most beloved performers of her generation, one whose recordings thus far have earned her nine gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum albums.

On Wallflower, Krall's stunning and surprising new album for Verve Records, this world-class player has consciously chosen to hand over a little control to sixteen-time Grammy® winning producer David Foster in order, once again, to do something unexpected. On the new album she has recorded a collection of songs from the sixties to present day, showcasing her considerable gifts as a vocalist in a bold and beautiful way. Krall sings a set of songs that include familiar popular classics like The Mamas and the Papas' "California Dreaming" and the Eagles' "Desperado," favorite vintage songs by Krall's musical heroes Bob Dylan (he inspired the album's title track "Wallflower") and Elton John ("Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word"). The album also features more recent gems like Crowded House's "Don't Dream It's Over" and a wonderful new composition from Paul McCartney ("If I Take You Home Tonight").  Recorded in Los Angeles and New York, Wallflower is a tremendously refreshing and collaborative effort that reflects Krall in a gorgeous new light. 

"A lot of the songs on Wallflower are ones I grew up loving on the radio and on vinyl, songs I heard at home. These are songs I've been singing to myself for years. I just needed the lyric sheet to make sure I wasn't singing the wrong words all this time. I got the 45 for "I'm Not In Love" by 10cc. I listened to Bryan Adams all the time. My parents and I both loved Linda Ronstadt, who was my inspiration to sing 'Desperado.' I even had a Peter Frampton poster on the wall. I was just a typical teenager hanging out with friends, not just listening to jazz. When Krall hears "Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word," she can still remember the musical Christmas gift that keeps on giving, a prized copy of her hero and mentor Elton John's album Blue Moves. "My biggest influence beside Oscar Peterson is Elton John," Krall says. "I have a picture somewhere of Christmas morning when Elton's Blue Moves album came out. I wanted that album so badly. The photo is of me when I was 16 with my mom and my dad holding that album. I used to listen to it downstairs on my record player. I had a Rhodes down there so I could play along.  Over the years, Elton has become like family. A while back we sang 'Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word' together on my husband Elvis Costello's TV show Spectacle. So many Elton songs mean so much to me but that one in particular is special."
Wallflower's title track is a relatively unknown Bob Dylan composition that has become a personal favorite of Krall's.

"I love Bob Dylan like crazy," says Krall. "I've only met him a few times. I told him I love the way he plays piano. He said, 'Well, you're a piano player, so you should know.' Dylan's music runs so deep. From the moment I heard the demo version of "Wallflower" with Bob singing his song along with a dog barking in the background, I have loved this song. I've been performing 'Wallflower' for a year and a half now with my band and I just had to record it here." "Wallflower" is a standout track featuring one of Krall's most affecting vocals ever and some outstanding guitar work from acclaimed guitarist Blake Mills. "This is a song that I feel very connected to," Krall explains. "I'm a bit of a method actor and 'Wallflower' is a part I really wanted to play.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Diana Krall (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

DIANA KRALL
Diana Krall is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer known for her outstanding contralto vocals. She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. In 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time.

Krall is the only jazz singer to have eight albums debuting at the top of the Billboard Jazz Albums. To date, she has won five Grammy Awards and eight Juno Awards. She has also earned nine gold, three platinum, and seven multi-platinum albums.

By any standard, this five-time Grammy®  winning jazz pianist and vocalist is one of the most accomplished and distinctive musicians in the world today. Respected far and wide as a wildly successful recording and performing artist, Krall remains a true musical force. At any given moment she could be producing Barbra Streisand's new album, serving as musical director and arranger for Paul McCartney or hitting the road for a good cause with Neil Young. As the record shows, Diana Krall has already done all that and much more. Along the way Krall has sold more albums than any other female jazz artist of the last 30 years, establishing herself as one of the best-selling and most beloved performers of her generation, one whose recordings thus far have earned her nine gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum albums.

On Wallflower, Krall's stunning and surprising new album for Verve Records, this world-class player has consciously chosen to hand over a little control to sixteen-time Grammy® winning producer David Foster in order, once again, to do something unexpected. On the new album she has recorded a collection of songs from the sixties to present day, showcasing her considerable gifts as a vocalist in a bold and beautiful way. Krall sings a set of songs that include familiar popular classics like The Mamas and the Papas' "California Dreaming" and the Eagles' "Desperado," favorite vintage songs by Krall's musical heroes Bob Dylan (he inspired the album's title track "Wallflower") and Elton John ("Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word"). The album also features more recent gems like Crowded House's "Don't Dream It's Over" and a wonderful new composition from Paul McCartney ("If I Take You Home Tonight").  Recorded in Los Angeles and New York, Wallflower is a tremendously refreshing and collaborative effort that reflects Krall in a gorgeous new light. 

"A lot of the songs on Wallflower are ones I grew up loving on the radio and on vinyl, songs I heard at home. These are songs I've been singing to myself for years. I just needed the lyric sheet to make sure I wasn't singing the wrong words all this time. I got the 45 for "I'm Not In Love" by 10cc. I listened to Bryan Adams all the time. My parents and I both loved Linda Ronstadt, who was my inspiration to sing 'Desperado.' I even had a Peter Frampton poster on the wall. I was just a typical teenager hanging out with friends, not just listening to jazz. When Krall hears "Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word," she can still remember the musical Christmas gift that keeps on giving, a prized copy of her hero and mentor Elton John's album Blue Moves. "My biggest influence beside Oscar Peterson is Elton John," Krall says. "I have a picture somewhere of Christmas morning when Elton's Blue Moves album came out. I wanted that album so badly. The photo is of me when I was 16 with my mom and my dad holding that album. I used to listen to it downstairs on my record player. I had a Rhodes down there so I could play along.  Over the years, Elton has become like family. A while back we sang 'Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word' together on my husband Elvis Costello's TV show Spectacle. So many Elton songs mean so much to me but that one in particular is special."
Wallflower's title track is a relatively unknown Bob Dylan composition that has become a personal favorite of Krall's.

"I love Bob Dylan like crazy," says Krall. "I've only met him a few times. I told him I love the way he plays piano. He said, 'Well, you're a piano player, so you should know.' Dylan's music runs so deep. From the moment I heard the demo version of "Wallflower" with Bob singing his song along with a dog barking in the background, I have loved this song. I've been performing 'Wallflower' for a year and a half now with my band and I just had to record it here." "Wallflower" is a standout track featuring one of Krall's most affecting vocals ever and some outstanding guitar work from acclaimed guitarist Blake Mills. "This is a song that I feel very connected to," Krall explains. "I'm a bit of a method actor and 'Wallflower' is a part I really wanted to play.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Diana Krall (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

DIANA KRALL
Diana Krall is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer known for her outstanding contralto vocals. She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. In 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time.

Krall is the only jazz singer to have eight albums debuting at the top of the Billboard Jazz Albums. To date, she has won five Grammy Awards and eight Juno Awards. She has also earned nine gold, three platinum, and seven multi-platinum albums.

By any standard, this five-time Grammy®  winning jazz pianist and vocalist is one of the most accomplished and distinctive musicians in the world today. Respected far and wide as a wildly successful recording and performing artist, Krall remains a true musical force. At any given moment she could be producing Barbra Streisand's new album, serving as musical director and arranger for Paul McCartney or hitting the road for a good cause with Neil Young. As the record shows, Diana Krall has already done all that and much more. Along the way Krall has sold more albums than any other female jazz artist of the last 30 years, establishing herself as one of the best-selling and most beloved performers of her generation, one whose recordings thus far have earned her nine gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum albums.

On Wallflower, Krall's stunning and surprising new album for Verve Records, this world-class player has consciously chosen to hand over a little control to sixteen-time Grammy® winning producer David Foster in order, once again, to do something unexpected. On the new album she has recorded a collection of songs from the sixties to present day, showcasing her considerable gifts as a vocalist in a bold and beautiful way. Krall sings a set of songs that include familiar popular classics like The Mamas and the Papas' "California Dreaming" and the Eagles' "Desperado," favorite vintage songs by Krall's musical heroes Bob Dylan (he inspired the album's title track "Wallflower") and Elton John ("Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word"). The album also features more recent gems like Crowded House's "Don't Dream It's Over" and a wonderful new composition from Paul McCartney ("If I Take You Home Tonight").  Recorded in Los Angeles and New York, Wallflower is a tremendously refreshing and collaborative effort that reflects Krall in a gorgeous new light. 

"A lot of the songs on Wallflower are ones I grew up loving on the radio and on vinyl, songs I heard at home. These are songs I've been singing to myself for years. I just needed the lyric sheet to make sure I wasn't singing the wrong words all this time. I got the 45 for "I'm Not In Love" by 10cc. I listened to Bryan Adams all the time. My parents and I both loved Linda Ronstadt, who was my inspiration to sing 'Desperado.' I even had a Peter Frampton poster on the wall. I was just a typical teenager hanging out with friends, not just listening to jazz. When Krall hears "Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word," she can still remember the musical Christmas gift that keeps on giving, a prized copy of her hero and mentor Elton John's album Blue Moves. "My biggest influence beside Oscar Peterson is Elton John," Krall says. "I have a picture somewhere of Christmas morning when Elton's Blue Moves album came out. I wanted that album so badly. The photo is of me when I was 16 with my mom and my dad holding that album. I used to listen to it downstairs on my record player. I had a Rhodes down there so I could play along.  Over the years, Elton has become like family. A while back we sang 'Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word' together on my husband Elvis Costello's TV show Spectacle. So many Elton songs mean so much to me but that one in particular is special."
Wallflower's title track is a relatively unknown Bob Dylan composition that has become a personal favorite of Krall's.

"I love Bob Dylan like crazy," says Krall. "I've only met him a few times. I told him I love the way he plays piano. He said, 'Well, you're a piano player, so you should know.' Dylan's music runs so deep. From the moment I heard the demo version of "Wallflower" with Bob singing his song along with a dog barking in the background, I have loved this song. I've been performing 'Wallflower' for a year and a half now with my band and I just had to record it here." "Wallflower" is a standout track featuring one of Krall's most affecting vocals ever and some outstanding guitar work from acclaimed guitarist Blake Mills. "This is a song that I feel very connected to," Krall explains. "I'm a bit of a method actor and 'Wallflower' is a part I really wanted to play.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Enso String Quartet - (8/17 - 8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

Enso String Quartet
With a 2010 Grammy nomination for "Best Chamber Music Performance," the NYC-based Enso String Quartet has quickly become one of the country's most exciting young ensembles. Founded at Yale University in 1999, the quartet earned honors at the Banff International String Quartet and Concert Artists Guild International Competitions.

Founded at Yale University in 1999, the Enso String Quartet has, in a decade and a half, risen to the front rank of string ensembles. Described by Strad magazine as "thrilling," and praised by the Washington Post for its "glorious sonorities," the Enso has won numerous awards, including top prizes at the Concert Artists Guild competition and the Banff International String Quartet Competition. In the words of Classical Voice, it is "one of the eminent string quartets of our era." Apart from a busy touring and teaching schedule, the New York-based quartet has made a number of critically acclaimed recordings for the Naxos label. In appraising the Enso's Grammy-nominated album of works by Alberto Ginastera, the reviewer for MusicWeb International declared, "The performances here by the Enso Quartet from America are quite staggeringly brilliant. I don't think I have been so thrilled by the sound of a string quartet in a long time.... If I could give this disc a standing ovation of one...I would!"

The Enso's members all were drawn to the string quartet repertoire because of its richness and diversity, and the ensemble is committed to exploring the four corners of that repertoire. The Enso regularly performs the classics of the string quartet literature, but also champions lesser-known works that deserve to be heard, along with much contemporary music, including works the Enso has commissioned. The ensemble also performs many of its own transcriptions, including arrangements of 16th Century Renaissance music.

"The quartet's ability to present music of three completely different idioms so persuasively puts it in the running for the mantle of Quartet of the Future" (Palm Beach ArtsPaper). World premieres include commissioned works by the esteemed New Zealand composer Dame Gillian Whitehead, and by the American composer Kurt Stallmann. The Enso also gave the world premiere of Joan Tower's Piano Quintet, with the composer at the keyboard.

In addition to their in-demand performances at concert halls around the world, the Enso and its individual members are sought after as instructors. The ensemble gives master classes for the next generation of professional musicians, but also works with enthusiastic amateurs, young and old, and with the autistic, in conjunction with the United Kingdom-based organization Music for Autism. The Enso has been awarded for its work with schoolchildren in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Based in New York City since 2007, the Enso String Quartet was previously in residence at Rice University in Houston, Texas, and at Northern Illinois University, in DeKalb, Illinois.

During the summer of 2013, the ensemble made debut appearances in Brazil, at the Festival Internacional de Inverno de Campos do Jordão, and in Mexico, at the San Miguel de Allende Festival Internacional de Musica de Camera. The 2013-14 season will include debuts at the Kennedy Center, and at Seattle's Town Hall. In 2013, the ensemble continued its artist residency at Interlochen College for Creative Arts, and will return to Rice University's Shepherd School of Music in Houston for a residency in 2014. The Enso's fourth recording for the Naxos label – featuring the quartets of Puccini, Verdi and Richard Strauss – is slated for release in Fall 2014.

The ensemble's name is derived from the Japanese Zen painting of the circle, which represents many things: perfection and imperfection, the moment of chaos that is creation, the emptiness of the void, the endless circle of life, and the fullness of the spirit.

8/17/2015 8/17/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Enso String Quartet - (8/19 - 8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

Enso String Quartet
With a 2010 Grammy nomination for "Best Chamber Music Performance," the NYC-based Enso String Quartet has quickly become one of the country's most exciting young ensembles. Founded at Yale University in 1999, the quartet earned honors at the Banff International String Quartet and Concert Artists Guild International Competitions.

Founded at Yale University in 1999, the Enso String Quartet has, in a decade and a half, risen to the front rank of string ensembles. Described by Strad magazine as "thrilling," and praised by the Washington Post for its "glorious sonorities," the Enso has won numerous awards, including top prizes at the Concert Artists Guild competition and the Banff International String Quartet Competition. In the words of Classical Voice, it is "one of the eminent string quartets of our era." Apart from a busy touring and teaching schedule, the New York-based quartet has made a number of critically acclaimed recordings for the Naxos label. In appraising the Enso's Grammy-nominated album of works by Alberto Ginastera, the reviewer for MusicWeb International declared, "The performances here by the Enso Quartet from America are quite staggeringly brilliant. I don't think I have been so thrilled by the sound of a string quartet in a long time.... If I could give this disc a standing ovation of one...I would!"

The Enso's members all were drawn to the string quartet repertoire because of its richness and diversity, and the ensemble is committed to exploring the four corners of that repertoire. The Enso regularly performs the classics of the string quartet literature, but also champions lesser-known works that deserve to be heard, along with much contemporary music, including works the Enso has commissioned. The ensemble also performs many of its own transcriptions, including arrangements of 16th Century Renaissance music.

"The quartet's ability to present music of three completely different idioms so persuasively puts it in the running for the mantle of Quartet of the Future" (Palm Beach ArtsPaper). World premieres include commissioned works by the esteemed New Zealand composer Dame Gillian Whitehead, and by the American composer Kurt Stallmann. The Enso also gave the world premiere of Joan Tower's Piano Quintet, with the composer at the keyboard.

In addition to their in-demand performances at concert halls around the world, the Enso and its individual members are sought after as instructors. The ensemble gives master classes for the next generation of professional musicians, but also works with enthusiastic amateurs, young and old, and with the autistic, in conjunction with the United Kingdom-based organization Music for Autism. The Enso has been awarded for its work with schoolchildren in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Based in New York City since 2007, the Enso String Quartet was previously in residence at Rice University in Houston, Texas, and at Northern Illinois University, in DeKalb, Illinois.

During the summer of 2013, the ensemble made debut appearances in Brazil, at the Festival Internacional de Inverno de Campos do Jordão, and in Mexico, at the San Miguel de Allende Festival Internacional de Musica de Camera. The 2013-14 season will include debuts at the Kennedy Center, and at Seattle's Town Hall. In 2013, the ensemble continued its artist residency at Interlochen College for Creative Arts, and will return to Rice University's Shepherd School of Music in Houston for a residency in 2014. The Enso's fourth recording for the Naxos label – featuring the quartets of Puccini, Verdi and Richard Strauss – is slated for release in Fall 2014.

The ensemble's name is derived from the Japanese Zen painting of the circle, which represents many things: perfection and imperfection, the moment of chaos that is creation, the emptiness of the void, the endless circle of life, and the fullness of the spirit.

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Enso String Quartet - (8/22 - 8pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

Enso String Quartet
With a 2010 Grammy nomination for "Best Chamber Music Performance," the NYC-based Enso String Quartet has quickly become one of the country's most exciting young ensembles. Founded at Yale University in 1999, the quartet earned honors at the Banff International String Quartet and Concert Artists Guild International Competitions.

Founded at Yale University in 1999, the Enso String Quartet has, in a decade and a half, risen to the front rank of string ensembles. Described by Strad magazine as "thrilling," and praised by the Washington Post for its "glorious sonorities," the Enso has won numerous awards, including top prizes at the Concert Artists Guild competition and the Banff International String Quartet Competition. In the words of Classical Voice, it is "one of the eminent string quartets of our era." Apart from a busy touring and teaching schedule, the New York-based quartet has made a number of critically acclaimed recordings for the Naxos label. In appraising the Enso's Grammy-nominated album of works by Alberto Ginastera, the reviewer for MusicWeb International declared, "The performances here by the Enso Quartet from America are quite staggeringly brilliant. I don't think I have been so thrilled by the sound of a string quartet in a long time.... If I could give this disc a standing ovation of one...I would!"

The Enso's members all were drawn to the string quartet repertoire because of its richness and diversity, and the ensemble is committed to exploring the four corners of that repertoire. The Enso regularly performs the classics of the string quartet literature, but also champions lesser-known works that deserve to be heard, along with much contemporary music, including works the Enso has commissioned. The ensemble also performs many of its own transcriptions, including arrangements of 16th Century Renaissance music.

"The quartet's ability to present music of three completely different idioms so persuasively puts it in the running for the mantle of Quartet of the Future" (Palm Beach ArtsPaper). World premieres include commissioned works by the esteemed New Zealand composer Dame Gillian Whitehead, and by the American composer Kurt Stallmann. The Enso also gave the world premiere of Joan Tower's Piano Quintet, with the composer at the keyboard.

In addition to their in-demand performances at concert halls around the world, the Enso and its individual members are sought after as instructors. The ensemble gives master classes for the next generation of professional musicians, but also works with enthusiastic amateurs, young and old, and with the autistic, in conjunction with the United Kingdom-based organization Music for Autism. The Enso has been awarded for its work with schoolchildren in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Based in New York City since 2007, the Enso String Quartet was previously in residence at Rice University in Houston, Texas, and at Northern Illinois University, in DeKalb, Illinois.

During the summer of 2013, the ensemble made debut appearances in Brazil, at the Festival Internacional de Inverno de Campos do Jordão, and in Mexico, at the San Miguel de Allende Festival Internacional de Musica de Camera. The 2013-14 season will include debuts at the Kennedy Center, and at Seattle's Town Hall. In 2013, the ensemble continued its artist residency at Interlochen College for Creative Arts, and will return to Rice University's Shepherd School of Music in Houston for a residency in 2014. The Enso's fourth recording for the Naxos label – featuring the quartets of Puccini, Verdi and Richard Strauss – is slated for release in Fall 2014.

The ensemble's name is derived from the Japanese Zen painting of the circle, which represents many things: perfection and imperfection, the moment of chaos that is creation, the emptiness of the void, the endless circle of life, and the fullness of the spirit.

8/22/2015 8/22/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Film Screening (4pm, DeRoy)

Location: DeRoy

Please arrive at DeRoy no later than 2:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Jazz - 8/7 (8pm, Chapel)

Location: Dendrinos Chapel

Please arrive at Dendrinos Chapel no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/7/2015 8/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre "Crazy For You" (8/6 - 7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

"CRAZY FOR YOU" - INTERLOCHEN HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL THEATRE COMPANY
"Crazy for You" is the story of Bobby Child, a well-to-do 1930′s playboy whose dream in life is to dance. And despite the serious efforts of his mother and soon-to-be ex-fiancée, Bobby achieves his dream! Memorable Gershwin tunes include "I Can't Be Bothered Now," "Bidin' My Time," "I Got Rhythm," "Naughty Baby," "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "But Not for Me," "Nice Work if You Can Get It," "Embraceable You" and "Someone to Watch Over Me." It's a high energy comedy which includes mistaken identity, plot twists, fabulous dance numbers and classic Gershwin music.

8/6/2015 8/6/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre "Crazy For You" (8/7 - 7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

"CRAZY FOR YOU" - INTERLOCHEN HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL THEATRE COMPANY
"Crazy for You" is the story of Bobby Child, a well-to-do 1930′s playboy whose dream in life is to dance. And despite the serious efforts of his mother and soon-to-be ex-fiancée, Bobby achieves his dream! Memorable Gershwin tunes include "I Can't Be Bothered Now," "Bidin' My Time," "I Got Rhythm," "Naughty Baby," "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "But Not for Me," "Nice Work if You Can Get It," "Embraceable You" and "Someone to Watch Over Me." It's a high energy comedy which includes mistaken identity, plot twists, fabulous dance numbers and classic Gershwin music.

8/7/2015 8/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre "Crazy For You" (8/8 - 7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

"CRAZY FOR YOU" - INTERLOCHEN HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL THEATRE COMPANY
"Crazy for You" is the story of Bobby Child, a well-to-do 1930′s playboy whose dream in life is to dance. And despite the serious efforts of his mother and soon-to-be ex-fiancée, Bobby achieves his dream! Memorable Gershwin tunes include "I Can't Be Bothered Now," "Bidin' My Time," "I Got Rhythm," "Naughty Baby," "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "But Not for Me," "Nice Work if You Can Get It," "Embraceable You" and "Someone to Watch Over Me." It's a high energy comedy which includes mistaken identity, plot twists, fabulous dance numbers and classic Gershwin music.

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre "Crazy For You" (8/9 - 1:30pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 12:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

"CRAZY FOR YOU" - INTERLOCHEN HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL THEATRE COMPANY
"Crazy for You" is the story of Bobby Child, a well-to-do 1930′s playboy whose dream in life is to dance. And despite the serious efforts of his mother and soon-to-be ex-fiancée, Bobby achieves his dream! Memorable Gershwin tunes include "I Can't Be Bothered Now," "Bidin' My Time," "I Got Rhythm," "Naughty Baby," "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "But Not for Me," "Nice Work if You Can Get It," "Embraceable You" and "Someone to Watch Over Me." It's a high energy comedy which includes mistaken identity, plot twists, fabulous dance numbers and classic Gershwin music. 

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre Workshop (1pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 12:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Musical Theatre Workshop (7pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Rep Theatre "Failure: A Love Story" - (8/1 - 7pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Rep Theatre "Failure: A Love Story" - (8/4 - 7pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/4/2015 8/4/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Rep Theatre "Failure: A Love Story" - (8/5 - 7pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/5/2015 8/5/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
HS Rep Theatre "Failure: A Love Story" (1:30pm, Harvey)

Location: Harvey Theatre

Please arrive at Harvey Theatre no later than 12:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
ICO/IWS/ISO - 8/8 (4pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 3:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Intermediate Concert Orchestra/Intermediate Wind Symphony/Intermediate Symphony Orchestra

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
INT Musical Theatre "Oliver!" (1:30pm, Phoenix)

Location: Phoenix Theatre

Please arrive at Phoenix Theatre no later than 12:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
INT Musical Theatre "Oliver!" (10am, Phoenix)

Location: Phoenix Theatre

Please arrive at Phoenix Theatre no later than 9:00 a.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

8/7/2015 8/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
INT Musical Theatre "Oliver!" (7pm, Phoenix)

Location: Phoenix Theatre

Please arrive at Phoenix Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/6/2015 8/6/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
INT Rep Theatre "The Wendy: A Story of Peter Pan" (8/6 - 10am, Phoenix)

Location: Phoenix Theatre

Please arrive at Phoenix Theatre no later than 9:00 a.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

8/6/2015 8/6/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
INT Rep Theatre "The Wendy: A Story of Peter Pan" (8/7 - 3pm, Phoenix)

Location: Phoenix Theatre

Please arrive at Phoenix Theatre no later than 2:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/7/2015 8/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
INT Rep Theatre "The Wendy: A Story of Peter Pan" (8/8 - 7pm, Phoenix)

Location: Phoenix Theatre

Please arrive at Phoenix Theatre no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen Philharmonic - 8/2 (3pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 2:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen Philharmonic - 8/9 (3pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 2:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Interlochen Summer Dance Ensemble (8pm, Upton-Morley)

Location: Upton-Morley Pavilion

Please arrive at Upton-Morley Pavilion no later than 7:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

 

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Joshua Davis' Homecoming Concert (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

JOSHUA DAVIS' HOMECOMING CONCERT: JOSHUA & HIS BAND
Traverse City's Joshua Davis is a singer-songwriter raised in the folk tradition, and he writes songs that blend the roots of American music with gritty rock n' roll and vintage soul. For over 15 years, Davis has made his living sharing his songs, stories and knowledge across the US and Canada at festivals, concert halls, coffeehouses and dives – as a solo act, front man for roots ensemble "Steppin' In It", classic swing band "Shout Sister Shout", songwriter showcase band "The Starlight Six" and frequently as a workshop facilitator, presenter or instructor. A professional musician for more than 15 years, Davis was recently featured as a Top 3 contestant on NBC's "The Voice" where he, among other accolades, sang duets with Adam Levine and nine-time Grammy award winner Sheryl Crow.

8/13/2015 8/13/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Joshua Davis' Homecoming Concert (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

JOSHUA DAVIS' HOMECOMING CONCERT: JOSHUA & HIS BAND
Traverse City's Joshua Davis is a singer-songwriter raised in the folk tradition, and he writes songs that blend the roots of American music with gritty rock n' roll and vintage soul. For over 15 years, Davis has made his living sharing his songs, stories and knowledge across the US and Canada at festivals, concert halls, coffeehouses and dives – as a solo act, front man for roots ensemble "Steppin' In It", classic swing band "Shout Sister Shout", songwriter showcase band "The Starlight Six" and frequently as a workshop facilitator, presenter or instructor. A professional musician for more than 15 years, Davis was recently featured as a Top 3 contestant on NBC's "The Voice" where he, among other accolades, sang duets with Adam Levine and nine-time Grammy award winner Sheryl Crow.

8/13/2015 8/13/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Joshua Davis' Homecoming Concert (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

JOSHUA DAVIS' HOMECOMING CONCERT: JOSHUA & HIS BAND
Traverse City's Joshua Davis is a singer-songwriter raised in the folk tradition, and he writes songs that blend the roots of American music with gritty rock n' roll and vintage soul. For over 15 years, Davis has made his living sharing his songs, stories and knowledge across the US and Canada at festivals, concert halls, coffeehouses and dives – as a solo act, front man for roots ensemble "Steppin' In It", classic swing band "Shout Sister Shout", songwriter showcase band "The Starlight Six" and frequently as a workshop facilitator, presenter or instructor. A professional musician for more than 15 years, Davis was recently featured as a Top 3 contestant on NBC's "The Voice" where he, among other accolades, sang duets with Adam Levine and nine-time Grammy award winner Sheryl Crow.

8/13/2015 8/13/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Joshua Davis' Homecoming Concert (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

JOSHUA DAVIS' HOMECOMING CONCERT: JOSHUA & HIS BAND
Traverse City's Joshua Davis is a singer-songwriter raised in the folk tradition, and he writes songs that blend the roots of American music with gritty rock n' roll and vintage soul. For over 15 years, Davis has made his living sharing his songs, stories and knowledge across the US and Canada at festivals, concert halls, coffeehouses and dives – as a solo act, front man for roots ensemble "Steppin' In It", classic swing band "Shout Sister Shout", songwriter showcase band "The Starlight Six" and frequently as a workshop facilitator, presenter or instructor. A professional musician for more than 15 years, Davis was recently featured as a Top 3 contestant on NBC's "The Voice" where he, among other accolades, sang duets with Adam Levine and nine-time Grammy award winner Sheryl Crow.

8/13/2015 8/13/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Joshua Davis' Homecoming Concert (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

JOSHUA DAVIS' HOMECOMING CONCERT: JOSHUA & HIS BAND
Traverse City's Joshua Davis is a singer-songwriter raised in the folk tradition, and he writes songs that blend the roots of American music with gritty rock n' roll and vintage soul. For over 15 years, Davis has made his living sharing his songs, stories and knowledge across the US and Canada at festivals, concert halls, coffeehouses and dives – as a solo act, front man for roots ensemble "Steppin' In It", classic swing band "Shout Sister Shout", songwriter showcase band "The Starlight Six" and frequently as a workshop facilitator, presenter or instructor. A professional musician for more than 15 years, Davis was recently featured as a Top 3 contestant on NBC's "The Voice" where he, among other accolades, sang duets with Adam Levine and nine-time Grammy award winner Sheryl Crow.

8/13/2015 8/13/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Joshua Davis' Homecoming Concert (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

JOSHUA DAVIS' HOMECOMING CONCERT: JOSHUA & HIS BAND
Traverse City's Joshua Davis is a singer-songwriter raised in the folk tradition, and he writes songs that blend the roots of American music with gritty rock n' roll and vintage soul. For over 15 years, Davis has made his living sharing his songs, stories and knowledge across the US and Canada at festivals, concert halls, coffeehouses and dives – as a solo act, front man for roots ensemble "Steppin' In It", classic swing band "Shout Sister Shout", songwriter showcase band "The Starlight Six" and frequently as a workshop facilitator, presenter or instructor. A professional musician for more than 15 years, Davis was recently featured as a Top 3 contestant on NBC's "The Voice" where he, among other accolades, sang duets with Adam Levine and nine-time Grammy award winner Sheryl Crow.

8/13/2015 8/13/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
JR Musical Theatre "YO, Vikings!" (8/6 - 10am, Penn Hall)

Location: Penn Hall

Please arrive at Penn Hall no later than 9:00 a.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/6/2015 8/6/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
JR Musical Theatre "YO, Vikings!" (8/7 - 10am, Penn Hall)

Location: Penn Hall

Please arrive at Penn Hall no later than 9:00 a.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/7/2015 8/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Junior Div. Final Concert - 8/7 (6pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 5:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

Junior Division Final includes Band, String Ensemble, String Orchestra, and Choir.

8/7/2015 8/7/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
O.A.R. (7pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

O.A.R. with special guest ALLEN STONE
O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans.

USA Today has called Allen Stone a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" and The New York Times has likened his socially conscious music to that of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers. But the 25-year-old singer-songwriter from the tiny backwoods town of Chewelah, Washington just sees himself as "a hippie with soul."

O.A.R
Classic American author Thomas Wolfe famously stated "you can't go home again," but don't tell that to the members of O.A.R. On their eighth studio album, THE ROCKVILLE LP, the shape-shifting rock band found that returning home triggered a journey of creative renewal and inspiration.

"This isn't about us going back to our musical roots per se," says lead singer Marc Roberge, who founded O.A.R. in 1996 with his Rockville, Md. high school classmates, drummer Chris Culos, guitarist Richard On, and bassist Benj Gershman (saxophonist Jerry DePizzo joined while the group was at Ohio State University). "It's about us getting inspired by the place we came from. We'd drive the same roads, visit the old haunts, spend time with our people.  Rockville was the catalyst then, and it's the catalyst now."

For the first time in a while, the band found that visiting their Maryland hometown gave them a sense of peace. For years, they had been pushing themselves to reach new levels of success, searching for their place in the world. Plus, turbulent times within their personal lives had led them to a slightly disconnected state. "I went home to Maryland many times while making this album and based these songs on all the familiar feelings that Rockville gave me," Roberge says. "I tried to focus in on the simple things that always made this band so creative and driven. For everyone in the band, this was a restart. We've been hanging out, enjoying life, letting things go…The whole album is about a reboot."

That sense of renewal is evident on the first single, the deep, yearning "Peace." "As we were writing it, I felt the weight of three years lift off my shoulders," Roberge says. "We wrote it about getting back to that even playing field after you go through turbulent times.  It's about what I see people going through all around me, everyone deserves second, third, fourth chances."

Roberge wrote "Peace"with Blair Daly and Nashville-based producer Nathan Chapman, best known for his work with Taylor Swift, after Roberge introduced himself to Chapman at an event in Los Angeles. The two got along so well that, in addition to "Peace," their writing sessions yielded three other songs: "Favorite Song," "Two Hands Up" and "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." Chapman produced "Favorite Song" and "Two Hands Up," while Gregg Wattenberg, who co-wrote O.A.R.'s No. 1 smash, "Shattered (Turn the Car Around)," produced "Peace." Chapman and Wattenberg shared production duties on "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." With those four tracks serving as the foundation for the album and as a boost to the band's confidence, Roberge produced the rest of the tracks on THE ROCKVILLE LP including a co-production with Jerry DePizzo on "The Element." "We felt like we were on to something with an overwhelming freedom to chase down some more songs," Roberge says.

THE ROCKVILLE LP, which was recorded in Nashville, Bethesda, Md., and Brooklyn, N.Y., features some of O.A.R.'s most diverse, intricate songs to date. Bold horn arrangements weave in and out of several of the tunes, including "Irish Rose" sequel and DePizzo showcase, the jangly, story song, "Caroline the Wrecking Ball," as well as the ambitious "The Architect," a song adored by longtime fans, but one O.A.R. had never committed to an album before.

Pure joy and light-heartedness infuse album opener, the spiky infectious anthem, "Two Hands Up," and the irrepressible reggae-tinged "Favorite Song" in which Roberge cheerfully references dozens of song titles. "We were driving down roads in Nashville and Maryland feeling nostalgic harkening back to the days of endlessly flipping through the radio dial singing loudly to your favorite songs.  This song is an ode to the hit, to recognize the pure joy you can get from a song and some rolled down windows."

O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans. With each studio album, the band has endeavored to achieve that sense of immediacy. On THE ROCKVILLE LP, "it comes the closest," Roberge says. "Every live band I know will always want nothing more than to carry their live performance onto the album.  It's an elusive thing to capture, so I'll never say we nailed it," Roberge says. "But I can guarantee we put that same live show energy and passion into each minute of THE ROCKVILLE LP and we can only hope the audience feels that."

Allen Stone
While the buzz was building in early 2014 about the Internet of Things, Allen Stone was recording in his rustic Washington State cabin and extolling the virtues of an old-fangled kind of connection – the one that exists between people playing music together. The 26-year-old soul singer, praised as a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" by USA Today, was working on the follow-up to his self-titled breakthrough album, which he released digitally on his own stickystones label in late 2011. Sure, he acknowledges, he could have written and recorded his new set of songs alone on a laptop – but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun.

"I'm a social person and, to me, the greatest energy that you can cultivate is a collaborative energy. It feels better when you've got somebody to bounce ideas off of," explains Stone.

While he's not keen on creating music with computers, Stone nevertheless considers technology to be an enormous blessing. In fact, he might have never met his co-producer, Swedish musician Magnus Tingsek, if he hadn't been digging around online for new music.

"I was like his number one fan for three years," recalls Allen. At that point, things started exploding for Stone. His self-titled album shot into the Top 10 of Billboard's Heatseekers chart and entered the Top 5 of iTunes' R&B/Soul charts shortly after its release. Soon the unsigned artist was appearing on shows like "Conan," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," "Last Call with Carson Daly" and "Live from Daryl's House." NPR's Ann Powers hailed the album as "meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful" and Forbes ran a feature focusing on his remarkable success as an independent artist. The New York Times' Jon Pareles praised Stone's live show, noting, "his music reached back four decades to the late 1960s and early '70s, when songwriters like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers brought introspection and social commentary to soul music."

A partnership with indie label ATO Records, which later released the album physically, opened new doors. Stone was voted one of mtvU's "Freshman 5" and named a VH1' "You Oughta Know" artist. He opened for Al Green and Dave Matthews and performed on "Late Show with David Letterman," "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno."

With an 85-date headline tour planned and two out of three openers selected, Stone asked his manager, "Why don't we see if Tingsek will come?" Tingsek, who had never toured outside of Scandinavia, agreed and the two became good friends as they traveled across North America and throughout Europe.

My number one joy is playing live, so when I write records I really just think of what song I could write that would be really fun to play live," says Stone. "Basically my job is to throw a party for people every night when we're on tour."

The non-stop pace of touring and promotional appearances makes it tempting to "set the cruise control a little too high," Allen notes, which can take its toll over time. After doing nearly 600 shows in two years, Stone was ready to turn from touring to recording. He moved from Seattle back to his hometown of Chewelah, WA – population 2,606.

"To find the balance I was looking for, I needed to move out to the middle of nowhere – where I have no distractions whatsoever," he says.

As he considered who he might like to collaborate with, Tingsek came to mind. Stone flew to Malmö, Sweden in November of 2013 and, after just a day in the studio with Tingsek, he knew it was the right pairing.

"Magnus is like Prince – he plays everything! He's like one of those Swiss Army knife musicians," says Stone. "He hears music completely different than I do. I'm more like a classic soul/classic blues kind of singer and he is able to hear music in this new, weird, disco jazz nuance that totally challenges me to broaden my ear and my vocality."

They wrote and recorded some tracks in Malmö and, in early 2014, reconvened in Chewelah so they could work with members of Allen's band. Stone is a big fan of recording with real – rather than virtual – instruments.

"The computer's such a nice tool that it's starting to take the human element out of art. So where's the line? If the computer is doing 85% of the work, then whose record is it?" he asks. "Every instrument on the new record is all real."

Seeing the preponderance of DJ acts at the festivals he has played has been a little unsettling. "I kind of feel like the clerk who's been working at the grocery story for twenty years and all of a sudden they start bringing in these self check-out stands. And you're like, what the hell are they gonna need me for?" says Allen, laughing.

9/1/2015 9/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
O.A.R. (7pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 4:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 4:45 p.m.

O.A.R. with special guest ALLEN STONE
O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans.

USA Today has called Allen Stone a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" and The New York Times has likened his socially conscious music to that of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers. But the 25-year-old singer-songwriter from the tiny backwoods town of Chewelah, Washington just sees himself as "a hippie with soul."

O.A.R
Classic American author Thomas Wolfe famously stated "you can't go home again," but don't tell that to the members of O.A.R. On their eighth studio album, THE ROCKVILLE LP, the shape-shifting rock band found that returning home triggered a journey of creative renewal and inspiration.

"This isn't about us going back to our musical roots per se," says lead singer Marc Roberge, who founded O.A.R. in 1996 with his Rockville, Md. high school classmates, drummer Chris Culos, guitarist Richard On, and bassist Benj Gershman (saxophonist Jerry DePizzo joined while the group was at Ohio State University). "It's about us getting inspired by the place we came from. We'd drive the same roads, visit the old haunts, spend time with our people.  Rockville was the catalyst then, and it's the catalyst now."

For the first time in a while, the band found that visiting their Maryland hometown gave them a sense of peace. For years, they had been pushing themselves to reach new levels of success, searching for their place in the world. Plus, turbulent times within their personal lives had led them to a slightly disconnected state. "I went home to Maryland many times while making this album and based these songs on all the familiar feelings that Rockville gave me," Roberge says. "I tried to focus in on the simple things that always made this band so creative and driven. For everyone in the band, this was a restart. We've been hanging out, enjoying life, letting things go…The whole album is about a reboot."

That sense of renewal is evident on the first single, the deep, yearning "Peace." "As we were writing it, I felt the weight of three years lift off my shoulders," Roberge says. "We wrote it about getting back to that even playing field after you go through turbulent times.  It's about what I see people going through all around me, everyone deserves second, third, fourth chances."

Roberge wrote "Peace"with Blair Daly and Nashville-based producer Nathan Chapman, best known for his work with Taylor Swift, after Roberge introduced himself to Chapman at an event in Los Angeles. The two got along so well that, in addition to "Peace," their writing sessions yielded three other songs: "Favorite Song," "Two Hands Up" and "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." Chapman produced "Favorite Song" and "Two Hands Up," while Gregg Wattenberg, who co-wrote O.A.R.'s No. 1 smash, "Shattered (Turn the Car Around)," produced "Peace." Chapman and Wattenberg shared production duties on "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." With those four tracks serving as the foundation for the album and as a boost to the band's confidence, Roberge produced the rest of the tracks on THE ROCKVILLE LP including a co-production with Jerry DePizzo on "The Element." "We felt like we were on to something with an overwhelming freedom to chase down some more songs," Roberge says.

THE ROCKVILLE LP, which was recorded in Nashville, Bethesda, Md., and Brooklyn, N.Y., features some of O.A.R.'s most diverse, intricate songs to date. Bold horn arrangements weave in and out of several of the tunes, including "Irish Rose" sequel and DePizzo showcase, the jangly, story song, "Caroline the Wrecking Ball," as well as the ambitious "The Architect," a song adored by longtime fans, but one O.A.R. had never committed to an album before.

Pure joy and light-heartedness infuse album opener, the spiky infectious anthem, "Two Hands Up," and the irrepressible reggae-tinged "Favorite Song" in which Roberge cheerfully references dozens of song titles. "We were driving down roads in Nashville and Maryland feeling nostalgic harkening back to the days of endlessly flipping through the radio dial singing loudly to your favorite songs.  This song is an ode to the hit, to recognize the pure joy you can get from a song and some rolled down windows."

O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans. With each studio album, the band has endeavored to achieve that sense of immediacy. On THE ROCKVILLE LP, "it comes the closest," Roberge says. "Every live band I know will always want nothing more than to carry their live performance onto the album.  It's an elusive thing to capture, so I'll never say we nailed it," Roberge says. "But I can guarantee we put that same live show energy and passion into each minute of THE ROCKVILLE LP and we can only hope the audience feels that."

Allen Stone
While the buzz was building in early 2014 about the Internet of Things, Allen Stone was recording in his rustic Washington State cabin and extolling the virtues of an old-fangled kind of connection – the one that exists between people playing music together. The 26-year-old soul singer, praised as a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" by USA Today, was working on the follow-up to his self-titled breakthrough album, which he released digitally on his own stickystones label in late 2011. Sure, he acknowledges, he could have written and recorded his new set of songs alone on a laptop – but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun.

"I'm a social person and, to me, the greatest energy that you can cultivate is a collaborative energy. It feels better when you've got somebody to bounce ideas off of," explains Stone.

While he's not keen on creating music with computers, Stone nevertheless considers technology to be an enormous blessing. In fact, he might have never met his co-producer, Swedish musician Magnus Tingsek, if he hadn't been digging around online for new music.

"I was like his number one fan for three years," recalls Allen. At that point, things started exploding for Stone. His self-titled album shot into the Top 10 of Billboard's Heatseekers chart and entered the Top 5 of iTunes' R&B/Soul charts shortly after its release. Soon the unsigned artist was appearing on shows like "Conan," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," "Last Call with Carson Daly" and "Live from Daryl's House." NPR's Ann Powers hailed the album as "meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful" and Forbes ran a feature focusing on his remarkable success as an independent artist. The New York Times' Jon Pareles praised Stone's live show, noting, "his music reached back four decades to the late 1960s and early '70s, when songwriters like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers brought introspection and social commentary to soul music."

A partnership with indie label ATO Records, which later released the album physically, opened new doors. Stone was voted one of mtvU's "Freshman 5" and named a VH1' "You Oughta Know" artist. He opened for Al Green and Dave Matthews and performed on "Late Show with David Letterman," "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno."

With an 85-date headline tour planned and two out of three openers selected, Stone asked his manager, "Why don't we see if Tingsek will come?" Tingsek, who had never toured outside of Scandinavia, agreed and the two became good friends as they traveled across North America and throughout Europe.

My number one joy is playing live, so when I write records I really just think of what song I could write that would be really fun to play live," says Stone. "Basically my job is to throw a party for people every night when we're on tour."

The non-stop pace of touring and promotional appearances makes it tempting to "set the cruise control a little too high," Allen notes, which can take its toll over time. After doing nearly 600 shows in two years, Stone was ready to turn from touring to recording. He moved from Seattle back to his hometown of Chewelah, WA – population 2,606.

"To find the balance I was looking for, I needed to move out to the middle of nowhere – where I have no distractions whatsoever," he says.

As he considered who he might like to collaborate with, Tingsek came to mind. Stone flew to Malmö, Sweden in November of 2013 and, after just a day in the studio with Tingsek, he knew it was the right pairing.

"Magnus is like Prince – he plays everything! He's like one of those Swiss Army knife musicians," says Stone. "He hears music completely different than I do. I'm more like a classic soul/classic blues kind of singer and he is able to hear music in this new, weird, disco jazz nuance that totally challenges me to broaden my ear and my vocality."

They wrote and recorded some tracks in Malmö and, in early 2014, reconvened in Chewelah so they could work with members of Allen's band. Stone is a big fan of recording with real – rather than virtual – instruments.

"The computer's such a nice tool that it's starting to take the human element out of art. So where's the line? If the computer is doing 85% of the work, then whose record is it?" he asks. "Every instrument on the new record is all real."

Seeing the preponderance of DJ acts at the festivals he has played has been a little unsettling. "I kind of feel like the clerk who's been working at the grocery story for twenty years and all of a sudden they start bringing in these self check-out stands. And you're like, what the hell are they gonna need me for?" says Allen, laughing.

9/1/2015 9/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
O.A.R. (7pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 4:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

O.A.R. with special guest ALLEN STONE
O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans.

USA Today has called Allen Stone a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" and The New York Times has likened his socially conscious music to that of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers. But the 25-year-old singer-songwriter from the tiny backwoods town of Chewelah, Washington just sees himself as "a hippie with soul."

O.A.R
Classic American author Thomas Wolfe famously stated "you can't go home again," but don't tell that to the members of O.A.R. On their eighth studio album, THE ROCKVILLE LP, the shape-shifting rock band found that returning home triggered a journey of creative renewal and inspiration.

"This isn't about us going back to our musical roots per se," says lead singer Marc Roberge, who founded O.A.R. in 1996 with his Rockville, Md. high school classmates, drummer Chris Culos, guitarist Richard On, and bassist Benj Gershman (saxophonist Jerry DePizzo joined while the group was at Ohio State University). "It's about us getting inspired by the place we came from. We'd drive the same roads, visit the old haunts, spend time with our people.  Rockville was the catalyst then, and it's the catalyst now."

For the first time in a while, the band found that visiting their Maryland hometown gave them a sense of peace. For years, they had been pushing themselves to reach new levels of success, searching for their place in the world. Plus, turbulent times within their personal lives had led them to a slightly disconnected state. "I went home to Maryland many times while making this album and based these songs on all the familiar feelings that Rockville gave me," Roberge says. "I tried to focus in on the simple things that always made this band so creative and driven. For everyone in the band, this was a restart. We've been hanging out, enjoying life, letting things go…The whole album is about a reboot."

That sense of renewal is evident on the first single, the deep, yearning "Peace." "As we were writing it, I felt the weight of three years lift off my shoulders," Roberge says. "We wrote it about getting back to that even playing field after you go through turbulent times.  It's about what I see people going through all around me, everyone deserves second, third, fourth chances."

Roberge wrote "Peace"with Blair Daly and Nashville-based producer Nathan Chapman, best known for his work with Taylor Swift, after Roberge introduced himself to Chapman at an event in Los Angeles. The two got along so well that, in addition to "Peace," their writing sessions yielded three other songs: "Favorite Song," "Two Hands Up" and "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." Chapman produced "Favorite Song" and "Two Hands Up," while Gregg Wattenberg, who co-wrote O.A.R.'s No. 1 smash, "Shattered (Turn the Car Around)," produced "Peace." Chapman and Wattenberg shared production duties on "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." With those four tracks serving as the foundation for the album and as a boost to the band's confidence, Roberge produced the rest of the tracks on THE ROCKVILLE LP including a co-production with Jerry DePizzo on "The Element." "We felt like we were on to something with an overwhelming freedom to chase down some more songs," Roberge says.

THE ROCKVILLE LP, which was recorded in Nashville, Bethesda, Md., and Brooklyn, N.Y., features some of O.A.R.'s most diverse, intricate songs to date. Bold horn arrangements weave in and out of several of the tunes, including "Irish Rose" sequel and DePizzo showcase, the jangly, story song, "Caroline the Wrecking Ball," as well as the ambitious "The Architect," a song adored by longtime fans, but one O.A.R. had never committed to an album before.

Pure joy and light-heartedness infuse album opener, the spiky infectious anthem, "Two Hands Up," and the irrepressible reggae-tinged "Favorite Song" in which Roberge cheerfully references dozens of song titles. "We were driving down roads in Nashville and Maryland feeling nostalgic harkening back to the days of endlessly flipping through the radio dial singing loudly to your favorite songs.  This song is an ode to the hit, to recognize the pure joy you can get from a song and some rolled down windows."

O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans. With each studio album, the band has endeavored to achieve that sense of immediacy. On THE ROCKVILLE LP, "it comes the closest," Roberge says. "Every live band I know will always want nothing more than to carry their live performance onto the album.  It's an elusive thing to capture, so I'll never say we nailed it," Roberge says. "But I can guarantee we put that same live show energy and passion into each minute of THE ROCKVILLE LP and we can only hope the audience feels that."

Allen Stone
While the buzz was building in early 2014 about the Internet of Things, Allen Stone was recording in his rustic Washington State cabin and extolling the virtues of an old-fangled kind of connection – the one that exists between people playing music together. The 26-year-old soul singer, praised as a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" by USA Today, was working on the follow-up to his self-titled breakthrough album, which he released digitally on his own stickystones label in late 2011. Sure, he acknowledges, he could have written and recorded his new set of songs alone on a laptop – but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun.

"I'm a social person and, to me, the greatest energy that you can cultivate is a collaborative energy. It feels better when you've got somebody to bounce ideas off of," explains Stone.

While he's not keen on creating music with computers, Stone nevertheless considers technology to be an enormous blessing. In fact, he might have never met his co-producer, Swedish musician Magnus Tingsek, if he hadn't been digging around online for new music.

"I was like his number one fan for three years," recalls Allen. At that point, things started exploding for Stone. His self-titled album shot into the Top 10 of Billboard's Heatseekers chart and entered the Top 5 of iTunes' R&B/Soul charts shortly after its release. Soon the unsigned artist was appearing on shows like "Conan," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," "Last Call with Carson Daly" and "Live from Daryl's House." NPR's Ann Powers hailed the album as "meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful" and Forbes ran a feature focusing on his remarkable success as an independent artist. The New York Times' Jon Pareles praised Stone's live show, noting, "his music reached back four decades to the late 1960s and early '70s, when songwriters like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers brought introspection and social commentary to soul music."

A partnership with indie label ATO Records, which later released the album physically, opened new doors. Stone was voted one of mtvU's "Freshman 5" and named a VH1' "You Oughta Know" artist. He opened for Al Green and Dave Matthews and performed on "Late Show with David Letterman," "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno."

With an 85-date headline tour planned and two out of three openers selected, Stone asked his manager, "Why don't we see if Tingsek will come?" Tingsek, who had never toured outside of Scandinavia, agreed and the two became good friends as they traveled across North America and throughout Europe.

My number one joy is playing live, so when I write records I really just think of what song I could write that would be really fun to play live," says Stone. "Basically my job is to throw a party for people every night when we're on tour."

The non-stop pace of touring and promotional appearances makes it tempting to "set the cruise control a little too high," Allen notes, which can take its toll over time. After doing nearly 600 shows in two years, Stone was ready to turn from touring to recording. He moved from Seattle back to his hometown of Chewelah, WA – population 2,606.

"To find the balance I was looking for, I needed to move out to the middle of nowhere – where I have no distractions whatsoever," he says.

As he considered who he might like to collaborate with, Tingsek came to mind. Stone flew to Malmö, Sweden in November of 2013 and, after just a day in the studio with Tingsek, he knew it was the right pairing.

"Magnus is like Prince – he plays everything! He's like one of those Swiss Army knife musicians," says Stone. "He hears music completely different than I do. I'm more like a classic soul/classic blues kind of singer and he is able to hear music in this new, weird, disco jazz nuance that totally challenges me to broaden my ear and my vocality."

They wrote and recorded some tracks in Malmö and, in early 2014, reconvened in Chewelah so they could work with members of Allen's band. Stone is a big fan of recording with real – rather than virtual – instruments.

"The computer's such a nice tool that it's starting to take the human element out of art. So where's the line? If the computer is doing 85% of the work, then whose record is it?" he asks. "Every instrument on the new record is all real."

Seeing the preponderance of DJ acts at the festivals he has played has been a little unsettling. "I kind of feel like the clerk who's been working at the grocery story for twenty years and all of a sudden they start bringing in these self check-out stands. And you're like, what the hell are they gonna need me for?" says Allen, laughing.

9/1/2015 9/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
O.A.R. (7pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 5:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

O.A.R. with special guest ALLEN STONE
O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans.

USA Today has called Allen Stone a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" and The New York Times has likened his socially conscious music to that of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers. But the 25-year-old singer-songwriter from the tiny backwoods town of Chewelah, Washington just sees himself as "a hippie with soul."

O.A.R
Classic American author Thomas Wolfe famously stated "you can't go home again," but don't tell that to the members of O.A.R. On their eighth studio album, THE ROCKVILLE LP, the shape-shifting rock band found that returning home triggered a journey of creative renewal and inspiration.

"This isn't about us going back to our musical roots per se," says lead singer Marc Roberge, who founded O.A.R. in 1996 with his Rockville, Md. high school classmates, drummer Chris Culos, guitarist Richard On, and bassist Benj Gershman (saxophonist Jerry DePizzo joined while the group was at Ohio State University). "It's about us getting inspired by the place we came from. We'd drive the same roads, visit the old haunts, spend time with our people.  Rockville was the catalyst then, and it's the catalyst now."

For the first time in a while, the band found that visiting their Maryland hometown gave them a sense of peace. For years, they had been pushing themselves to reach new levels of success, searching for their place in the world. Plus, turbulent times within their personal lives had led them to a slightly disconnected state. "I went home to Maryland many times while making this album and based these songs on all the familiar feelings that Rockville gave me," Roberge says. "I tried to focus in on the simple things that always made this band so creative and driven. For everyone in the band, this was a restart. We've been hanging out, enjoying life, letting things go…The whole album is about a reboot."

That sense of renewal is evident on the first single, the deep, yearning "Peace." "As we were writing it, I felt the weight of three years lift off my shoulders," Roberge says. "We wrote it about getting back to that even playing field after you go through turbulent times.  It's about what I see people going through all around me, everyone deserves second, third, fourth chances."

Roberge wrote "Peace"with Blair Daly and Nashville-based producer Nathan Chapman, best known for his work with Taylor Swift, after Roberge introduced himself to Chapman at an event in Los Angeles. The two got along so well that, in addition to "Peace," their writing sessions yielded three other songs: "Favorite Song," "Two Hands Up" and "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." Chapman produced "Favorite Song" and "Two Hands Up," while Gregg Wattenberg, who co-wrote O.A.R.'s No. 1 smash, "Shattered (Turn the Car Around)," produced "Peace." Chapman and Wattenberg shared production duties on "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." With those four tracks serving as the foundation for the album and as a boost to the band's confidence, Roberge produced the rest of the tracks on THE ROCKVILLE LP including a co-production with Jerry DePizzo on "The Element." "We felt like we were on to something with an overwhelming freedom to chase down some more songs," Roberge says.

THE ROCKVILLE LP, which was recorded in Nashville, Bethesda, Md., and Brooklyn, N.Y., features some of O.A.R.'s most diverse, intricate songs to date. Bold horn arrangements weave in and out of several of the tunes, including "Irish Rose" sequel and DePizzo showcase, the jangly, story song, "Caroline the Wrecking Ball," as well as the ambitious "The Architect," a song adored by longtime fans, but one O.A.R. had never committed to an album before.

Pure joy and light-heartedness infuse album opener, the spiky infectious anthem, "Two Hands Up," and the irrepressible reggae-tinged "Favorite Song" in which Roberge cheerfully references dozens of song titles. "We were driving down roads in Nashville and Maryland feeling nostalgic harkening back to the days of endlessly flipping through the radio dial singing loudly to your favorite songs.  This song is an ode to the hit, to recognize the pure joy you can get from a song and some rolled down windows."

O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans. With each studio album, the band has endeavored to achieve that sense of immediacy. On THE ROCKVILLE LP, "it comes the closest," Roberge says. "Every live band I know will always want nothing more than to carry their live performance onto the album.  It's an elusive thing to capture, so I'll never say we nailed it," Roberge says. "But I can guarantee we put that same live show energy and passion into each minute of THE ROCKVILLE LP and we can only hope the audience feels that."

Allen Stone
While the buzz was building in early 2014 about the Internet of Things, Allen Stone was recording in his rustic Washington State cabin and extolling the virtues of an old-fangled kind of connection – the one that exists between people playing music together. The 26-year-old soul singer, praised as a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" by USA Today, was working on the follow-up to his self-titled breakthrough album, which he released digitally on his own stickystones label in late 2011. Sure, he acknowledges, he could have written and recorded his new set of songs alone on a laptop – but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun.

"I'm a social person and, to me, the greatest energy that you can cultivate is a collaborative energy. It feels better when you've got somebody to bounce ideas off of," explains Stone.

While he's not keen on creating music with computers, Stone nevertheless considers technology to be an enormous blessing. In fact, he might have never met his co-producer, Swedish musician Magnus Tingsek, if he hadn't been digging around online for new music.

"I was like his number one fan for three years," recalls Allen. At that point, things started exploding for Stone. His self-titled album shot into the Top 10 of Billboard's Heatseekers chart and entered the Top 5 of iTunes' R&B/Soul charts shortly after its release. Soon the unsigned artist was appearing on shows like "Conan," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," "Last Call with Carson Daly" and "Live from Daryl's House." NPR's Ann Powers hailed the album as "meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful" and Forbes ran a feature focusing on his remarkable success as an independent artist. The New York Times' Jon Pareles praised Stone's live show, noting, "his music reached back four decades to the late 1960s and early '70s, when songwriters like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers brought introspection and social commentary to soul music."

A partnership with indie label ATO Records, which later released the album physically, opened new doors. Stone was voted one of mtvU's "Freshman 5" and named a VH1' "You Oughta Know" artist. He opened for Al Green and Dave Matthews and performed on "Late Show with David Letterman," "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno."

With an 85-date headline tour planned and two out of three openers selected, Stone asked his manager, "Why don't we see if Tingsek will come?" Tingsek, who had never toured outside of Scandinavia, agreed and the two became good friends as they traveled across North America and throughout Europe.

My number one joy is playing live, so when I write records I really just think of what song I could write that would be really fun to play live," says Stone. "Basically my job is to throw a party for people every night when we're on tour."

The non-stop pace of touring and promotional appearances makes it tempting to "set the cruise control a little too high," Allen notes, which can take its toll over time. After doing nearly 600 shows in two years, Stone was ready to turn from touring to recording. He moved from Seattle back to his hometown of Chewelah, WA – population 2,606.

"To find the balance I was looking for, I needed to move out to the middle of nowhere – where I have no distractions whatsoever," he says.

As he considered who he might like to collaborate with, Tingsek came to mind. Stone flew to Malmö, Sweden in November of 2013 and, after just a day in the studio with Tingsek, he knew it was the right pairing.

"Magnus is like Prince – he plays everything! He's like one of those Swiss Army knife musicians," says Stone. "He hears music completely different than I do. I'm more like a classic soul/classic blues kind of singer and he is able to hear music in this new, weird, disco jazz nuance that totally challenges me to broaden my ear and my vocality."

They wrote and recorded some tracks in Malmö and, in early 2014, reconvened in Chewelah so they could work with members of Allen's band. Stone is a big fan of recording with real – rather than virtual – instruments.

"The computer's such a nice tool that it's starting to take the human element out of art. So where's the line? If the computer is doing 85% of the work, then whose record is it?" he asks. "Every instrument on the new record is all real."

Seeing the preponderance of DJ acts at the festivals he has played has been a little unsettling. "I kind of feel like the clerk who's been working at the grocery story for twenty years and all of a sudden they start bringing in these self check-out stands. And you're like, what the hell are they gonna need me for?" says Allen, laughing.

9/1/2015 9/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
O.A.R. (7pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 4:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

O.A.R. with special guest ALLEN STONE
O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans.

USA Today has called Allen Stone a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" and The New York Times has likened his socially conscious music to that of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers. But the 25-year-old singer-songwriter from the tiny backwoods town of Chewelah, Washington just sees himself as "a hippie with soul."

O.A.R
Classic American author Thomas Wolfe famously stated "you can't go home again," but don't tell that to the members of O.A.R. On their eighth studio album, THE ROCKVILLE LP, the shape-shifting rock band found that returning home triggered a journey of creative renewal and inspiration.

"This isn't about us going back to our musical roots per se," says lead singer Marc Roberge, who founded O.A.R. in 1996 with his Rockville, Md. high school classmates, drummer Chris Culos, guitarist Richard On, and bassist Benj Gershman (saxophonist Jerry DePizzo joined while the group was at Ohio State University). "It's about us getting inspired by the place we came from. We'd drive the same roads, visit the old haunts, spend time with our people.  Rockville was the catalyst then, and it's the catalyst now."

For the first time in a while, the band found that visiting their Maryland hometown gave them a sense of peace. For years, they had been pushing themselves to reach new levels of success, searching for their place in the world. Plus, turbulent times within their personal lives had led them to a slightly disconnected state. "I went home to Maryland many times while making this album and based these songs on all the familiar feelings that Rockville gave me," Roberge says. "I tried to focus in on the simple things that always made this band so creative and driven. For everyone in the band, this was a restart. We've been hanging out, enjoying life, letting things go…The whole album is about a reboot."

That sense of renewal is evident on the first single, the deep, yearning "Peace." "As we were writing it, I felt the weight of three years lift off my shoulders," Roberge says. "We wrote it about getting back to that even playing field after you go through turbulent times.  It's about what I see people going through all around me, everyone deserves second, third, fourth chances."

Roberge wrote "Peace"with Blair Daly and Nashville-based producer Nathan Chapman, best known for his work with Taylor Swift, after Roberge introduced himself to Chapman at an event in Los Angeles. The two got along so well that, in addition to "Peace," their writing sessions yielded three other songs: "Favorite Song," "Two Hands Up" and "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." Chapman produced "Favorite Song" and "Two Hands Up," while Gregg Wattenberg, who co-wrote O.A.R.'s No. 1 smash, "Shattered (Turn the Car Around)," produced "Peace." Chapman and Wattenberg shared production duties on "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." With those four tracks serving as the foundation for the album and as a boost to the band's confidence, Roberge produced the rest of the tracks on THE ROCKVILLE LP including a co-production with Jerry DePizzo on "The Element." "We felt like we were on to something with an overwhelming freedom to chase down some more songs," Roberge says.

THE ROCKVILLE LP, which was recorded in Nashville, Bethesda, Md., and Brooklyn, N.Y., features some of O.A.R.'s most diverse, intricate songs to date. Bold horn arrangements weave in and out of several of the tunes, including "Irish Rose" sequel and DePizzo showcase, the jangly, story song, "Caroline the Wrecking Ball," as well as the ambitious "The Architect," a song adored by longtime fans, but one O.A.R. had never committed to an album before.

Pure joy and light-heartedness infuse album opener, the spiky infectious anthem, "Two Hands Up," and the irrepressible reggae-tinged "Favorite Song" in which Roberge cheerfully references dozens of song titles. "We were driving down roads in Nashville and Maryland feeling nostalgic harkening back to the days of endlessly flipping through the radio dial singing loudly to your favorite songs.  This song is an ode to the hit, to recognize the pure joy you can get from a song and some rolled down windows."

O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans. With each studio album, the band has endeavored to achieve that sense of immediacy. On THE ROCKVILLE LP, "it comes the closest," Roberge says. "Every live band I know will always want nothing more than to carry their live performance onto the album.  It's an elusive thing to capture, so I'll never say we nailed it," Roberge says. "But I can guarantee we put that same live show energy and passion into each minute of THE ROCKVILLE LP and we can only hope the audience feels that."

Allen Stone
While the buzz was building in early 2014 about the Internet of Things, Allen Stone was recording in his rustic Washington State cabin and extolling the virtues of an old-fangled kind of connection – the one that exists between people playing music together. The 26-year-old soul singer, praised as a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" by USA Today, was working on the follow-up to his self-titled breakthrough album, which he released digitally on his own stickystones label in late 2011. Sure, he acknowledges, he could have written and recorded his new set of songs alone on a laptop – but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun.

"I'm a social person and, to me, the greatest energy that you can cultivate is a collaborative energy. It feels better when you've got somebody to bounce ideas off of," explains Stone.

While he's not keen on creating music with computers, Stone nevertheless considers technology to be an enormous blessing. In fact, he might have never met his co-producer, Swedish musician Magnus Tingsek, if he hadn't been digging around online for new music.

"I was like his number one fan for three years," recalls Allen. At that point, things started exploding for Stone. His self-titled album shot into the Top 10 of Billboard's Heatseekers chart and entered the Top 5 of iTunes' R&B/Soul charts shortly after its release. Soon the unsigned artist was appearing on shows like "Conan," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," "Last Call with Carson Daly" and "Live from Daryl's House." NPR's Ann Powers hailed the album as "meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful" and Forbes ran a feature focusing on his remarkable success as an independent artist. The New York Times' Jon Pareles praised Stone's live show, noting, "his music reached back four decades to the late 1960s and early '70s, when songwriters like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers brought introspection and social commentary to soul music."

A partnership with indie label ATO Records, which later released the album physically, opened new doors. Stone was voted one of mtvU's "Freshman 5" and named a VH1' "You Oughta Know" artist. He opened for Al Green and Dave Matthews and performed on "Late Show with David Letterman," "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno."

With an 85-date headline tour planned and two out of three openers selected, Stone asked his manager, "Why don't we see if Tingsek will come?" Tingsek, who had never toured outside of Scandinavia, agreed and the two became good friends as they traveled across North America and throughout Europe.

My number one joy is playing live, so when I write records I really just think of what song I could write that would be really fun to play live," says Stone. "Basically my job is to throw a party for people every night when we're on tour."

The non-stop pace of touring and promotional appearances makes it tempting to "set the cruise control a little too high," Allen notes, which can take its toll over time. After doing nearly 600 shows in two years, Stone was ready to turn from touring to recording. He moved from Seattle back to his hometown of Chewelah, WA – population 2,606.

"To find the balance I was looking for, I needed to move out to the middle of nowhere – where I have no distractions whatsoever," he says.

As he considered who he might like to collaborate with, Tingsek came to mind. Stone flew to Malmö, Sweden in November of 2013 and, after just a day in the studio with Tingsek, he knew it was the right pairing.

"Magnus is like Prince – he plays everything! He's like one of those Swiss Army knife musicians," says Stone. "He hears music completely different than I do. I'm more like a classic soul/classic blues kind of singer and he is able to hear music in this new, weird, disco jazz nuance that totally challenges me to broaden my ear and my vocality."

They wrote and recorded some tracks in Malmö and, in early 2014, reconvened in Chewelah so they could work with members of Allen's band. Stone is a big fan of recording with real – rather than virtual – instruments.

"The computer's such a nice tool that it's starting to take the human element out of art. So where's the line? If the computer is doing 85% of the work, then whose record is it?" he asks. "Every instrument on the new record is all real."

Seeing the preponderance of DJ acts at the festivals he has played has been a little unsettling. "I kind of feel like the clerk who's been working at the grocery story for twenty years and all of a sudden they start bringing in these self check-out stands. And you're like, what the hell are they gonna need me for?" says Allen, laughing.

9/1/2015 9/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
O.A.R. (7pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

O.A.R. with special guest ALLEN STONE
O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans.

USA Today has called Allen Stone a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" and The New York Times has likened his socially conscious music to that of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers. But the 25-year-old singer-songwriter from the tiny backwoods town of Chewelah, Washington just sees himself as "a hippie with soul."

O.A.R
Classic American author Thomas Wolfe famously stated "you can't go home again," but don't tell that to the members of O.A.R. On their eighth studio album, THE ROCKVILLE LP, the shape-shifting rock band found that returning home triggered a journey of creative renewal and inspiration.

"This isn't about us going back to our musical roots per se," says lead singer Marc Roberge, who founded O.A.R. in 1996 with his Rockville, Md. high school classmates, drummer Chris Culos, guitarist Richard On, and bassist Benj Gershman (saxophonist Jerry DePizzo joined while the group was at Ohio State University). "It's about us getting inspired by the place we came from. We'd drive the same roads, visit the old haunts, spend time with our people.  Rockville was the catalyst then, and it's the catalyst now."

For the first time in a while, the band found that visiting their Maryland hometown gave them a sense of peace. For years, they had been pushing themselves to reach new levels of success, searching for their place in the world. Plus, turbulent times within their personal lives had led them to a slightly disconnected state. "I went home to Maryland many times while making this album and based these songs on all the familiar feelings that Rockville gave me," Roberge says. "I tried to focus in on the simple things that always made this band so creative and driven. For everyone in the band, this was a restart. We've been hanging out, enjoying life, letting things go…The whole album is about a reboot."

That sense of renewal is evident on the first single, the deep, yearning "Peace." "As we were writing it, I felt the weight of three years lift off my shoulders," Roberge says. "We wrote it about getting back to that even playing field after you go through turbulent times.  It's about what I see people going through all around me, everyone deserves second, third, fourth chances."

Roberge wrote "Peace"with Blair Daly and Nashville-based producer Nathan Chapman, best known for his work with Taylor Swift, after Roberge introduced himself to Chapman at an event in Los Angeles. The two got along so well that, in addition to "Peace," their writing sessions yielded three other songs: "Favorite Song," "Two Hands Up" and "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." Chapman produced "Favorite Song" and "Two Hands Up," while Gregg Wattenberg, who co-wrote O.A.R.'s No. 1 smash, "Shattered (Turn the Car Around)," produced "Peace." Chapman and Wattenberg shared production duties on "We'll Pick Up Where We Left Off." With those four tracks serving as the foundation for the album and as a boost to the band's confidence, Roberge produced the rest of the tracks on THE ROCKVILLE LP including a co-production with Jerry DePizzo on "The Element." "We felt like we were on to something with an overwhelming freedom to chase down some more songs," Roberge says.

THE ROCKVILLE LP, which was recorded in Nashville, Bethesda, Md., and Brooklyn, N.Y., features some of O.A.R.'s most diverse, intricate songs to date. Bold horn arrangements weave in and out of several of the tunes, including "Irish Rose" sequel and DePizzo showcase, the jangly, story song, "Caroline the Wrecking Ball," as well as the ambitious "The Architect," a song adored by longtime fans, but one O.A.R. had never committed to an album before.

Pure joy and light-heartedness infuse album opener, the spiky infectious anthem, "Two Hands Up," and the irrepressible reggae-tinged "Favorite Song" in which Roberge cheerfully references dozens of song titles. "We were driving down roads in Nashville and Maryland feeling nostalgic harkening back to the days of endlessly flipping through the radio dial singing loudly to your favorite songs.  This song is an ode to the hit, to recognize the pure joy you can get from a song and some rolled down windows."

O.A.R. is renowned for its intense, vibrant live show —including selling out Madison Square Garden twice —and the communal feeling it shares with its fans. With each studio album, the band has endeavored to achieve that sense of immediacy. On THE ROCKVILLE LP, "it comes the closest," Roberge says. "Every live band I know will always want nothing more than to carry their live performance onto the album.  It's an elusive thing to capture, so I'll never say we nailed it," Roberge says. "But I can guarantee we put that same live show energy and passion into each minute of THE ROCKVILLE LP and we can only hope the audience feels that."

Allen Stone
While the buzz was building in early 2014 about the Internet of Things, Allen Stone was recording in his rustic Washington State cabin and extolling the virtues of an old-fangled kind of connection – the one that exists between people playing music together. The 26-year-old soul singer, praised as a "pitch-perfect powerhouse" by USA Today, was working on the follow-up to his self-titled breakthrough album, which he released digitally on his own stickystones label in late 2011. Sure, he acknowledges, he could have written and recorded his new set of songs alone on a laptop – but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun.

"I'm a social person and, to me, the greatest energy that you can cultivate is a collaborative energy. It feels better when you've got somebody to bounce ideas off of," explains Stone.

While he's not keen on creating music with computers, Stone nevertheless considers technology to be an enormous blessing. In fact, he might have never met his co-producer, Swedish musician Magnus Tingsek, if he hadn't been digging around online for new music.

"I was like his number one fan for three years," recalls Allen. At that point, things started exploding for Stone. His self-titled album shot into the Top 10 of Billboard's Heatseekers chart and entered the Top 5 of iTunes' R&B/Soul charts shortly after its release. Soon the unsigned artist was appearing on shows like "Conan," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," "Last Call with Carson Daly" and "Live from Daryl's House." NPR's Ann Powers hailed the album as "meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful" and Forbes ran a feature focusing on his remarkable success as an independent artist. The New York Times' Jon Pareles praised Stone's live show, noting, "his music reached back four decades to the late 1960s and early '70s, when songwriters like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers brought introspection and social commentary to soul music."

A partnership with indie label ATO Records, which later released the album physically, opened new doors. Stone was voted one of mtvU's "Freshman 5" and named a VH1' "You Oughta Know" artist. He opened for Al Green and Dave Matthews and performed on "Late Show with David Letterman," "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno."

With an 85-date headline tour planned and two out of three openers selected, Stone asked his manager, "Why don't we see if Tingsek will come?" Tingsek, who had never toured outside of Scandinavia, agreed and the two became good friends as they traveled across North America and throughout Europe.

My number one joy is playing live, so when I write records I really just think of what song I could write that would be really fun to play live," says Stone. "Basically my job is to throw a party for people every night when we're on tour."

The non-stop pace of touring and promotional appearances makes it tempting to "set the cruise control a little too high," Allen notes, which can take its toll over time. After doing nearly 600 shows in two years, Stone was ready to turn from touring to recording. He moved from Seattle back to his hometown of Chewelah, WA – population 2,606.

"To find the balance I was looking for, I needed to move out to the middle of nowhere – where I have no distractions whatsoever," he says.

As he considered who he might like to collaborate with, Tingsek came to mind. Stone flew to Malmö, Sweden in November of 2013 and, after just a day in the studio with Tingsek, he knew it was the right pairing.

"Magnus is like Prince – he plays everything! He's like one of those Swiss Army knife musicians," says Stone. "He hears music completely different than I do. I'm more like a classic soul/classic blues kind of singer and he is able to hear music in this new, weird, disco jazz nuance that totally challenges me to broaden my ear and my vocality."

They wrote and recorded some tracks in Malmö and, in early 2014, reconvened in Chewelah so they could work with members of Allen's band. Stone is a big fan of recording with real – rather than virtual – instruments.

"The computer's such a nice tool that it's starting to take the human element out of art. So where's the line? If the computer is doing 85% of the work, then whose record is it?" he asks. "Every instrument on the new record is all real."

Seeing the preponderance of DJ acts at the festivals he has played has been a little unsettling. "I kind of feel like the clerk who's been working at the grocery story for twenty years and all of a sudden they start bringing in these self check-out stands. And you're like, what the hell are they gonna need me for?" says Allen, laughing.

9/1/2015 9/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Organ - 8/2 (5pm, Chapel)

Location: Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 4:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Organ - 8/9 (5pm, Chapel)

Location: Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 4:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Singer-Songwriter - 8/1 (6:30pm, Chapel)

Location: Chapel

Please arrive at the Chapel no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Piano Guys (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

THE PIANO GUYS
Hailing from Utah, The Piano Guys became an Internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of strikingly original self-made music videos. They've made over 35 since joining forces in early 2011. Members include musicians Jon Schmidt (piano), Steven Sharp Nelson (cello) and "equally significant members" Paul Anderson and Al van der Beek. They have been seen on programs from The Today Show to The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. So far, their smash videos have netted more than 293 million views on YouTube and earn more than a half-million new views daily. Among their videos, The Piano Guys released an innovative, 10-handed version of One Direction's "What Makes You Beautiful" and a "Mission: Impossible" spy thriller featuring violinist Lindsey Stirling. Their self-titled album features more of the music they're famous for and includes sources ranging from Mozart to Michael Jackson.

8/25/2015 8/25/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Piano Guys (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

THE PIANO GUYS
Hailing from Utah, The Piano Guys became an Internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of strikingly original self-made music videos. They've made over 35 since joining forces in early 2011. Members include musicians Jon Schmidt (piano), Steven Sharp Nelson (cello) and "equally significant members" Paul Anderson and Al van der Beek. They have been seen on programs from The Today Show to The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. So far, their smash videos have netted more than 293 million views on YouTube and earn more than a half-million new views daily. Among their videos, The Piano Guys released an innovative, 10-handed version of One Direction's "What Makes You Beautiful" and a "Mission: Impossible" spy thriller featuring violinist Lindsey Stirling. Their self-titled album features more of the music they're famous for and includes sources ranging from Mozart to Michael Jackson.

8/25/2015 8/25/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Piano Guys (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

THE PIANO GUYS
Hailing from Utah, The Piano Guys became an Internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of strikingly original self-made music videos. They've made over 35 since joining forces in early 2011. Members include musicians Jon Schmidt (piano), Steven Sharp Nelson (cello) and "equally significant members" Paul Anderson and Al van der Beek. They have been seen on programs from The Today Show to The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. So far, their smash videos have netted more than 293 million views on YouTube and earn more than a half-million new views daily. Among their videos, The Piano Guys released an innovative, 10-handed version of One Direction's "What Makes You Beautiful" and a "Mission: Impossible" spy thriller featuring violinist Lindsey Stirling. Their self-titled album features more of the music they're famous for and includes sources ranging from Mozart to Michael Jackson.

8/25/2015 8/25/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Piano Guys (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

THE PIANO GUYS
Hailing from Utah, The Piano Guys became an Internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of strikingly original self-made music videos. They've made over 35 since joining forces in early 2011. Members include musicians Jon Schmidt (piano), Steven Sharp Nelson (cello) and "equally significant members" Paul Anderson and Al van der Beek. They have been seen on programs from The Today Show to The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. So far, their smash videos have netted more than 293 million views on YouTube and earn more than a half-million new views daily. Among their videos, The Piano Guys released an innovative, 10-handed version of One Direction's "What Makes You Beautiful" and a "Mission: Impossible" spy thriller featuring violinist Lindsey Stirling. Their self-titled album features more of the music they're famous for and includes sources ranging from Mozart to Michael Jackson.

8/25/2015 8/25/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Piano Guys (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

THE PIANO GUYS
Hailing from Utah, The Piano Guys became an Internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of strikingly original self-made music videos. They've made over 35 since joining forces in early 2011. Members include musicians Jon Schmidt (piano), Steven Sharp Nelson (cello) and "equally significant members" Paul Anderson and Al van der Beek. They have been seen on programs from The Today Show to The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. So far, their smash videos have netted more than 293 million views on YouTube and earn more than a half-million new views daily. Among their videos, The Piano Guys released an innovative, 10-handed version of One Direction's "What Makes You Beautiful" and a "Mission: Impossible" spy thriller featuring violinist Lindsey Stirling. Their self-titled album features more of the music they're famous for and includes sources ranging from Mozart to Michael Jackson.

8/25/2015 8/25/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
The Piano Guys (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

THE PIANO GUYS
Hailing from Utah, The Piano Guys became an Internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of strikingly original self-made music videos. They've made over 35 since joining forces in early 2011. Members include musicians Jon Schmidt (piano), Steven Sharp Nelson (cello) and "equally significant members" Paul Anderson and Al van der Beek. They have been seen on programs from The Today Show to The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. So far, their smash videos have netted more than 293 million views on YouTube and earn more than a half-million new views daily. Among their videos, The Piano Guys released an innovative, 10-handed version of One Direction's "What Makes You Beautiful" and a "Mission: Impossible" spy thriller featuring violinist Lindsey Stirling. Their self-titled album features more of the music they're famous for and includes sources ranging from Mozart to Michael Jackson.

8/25/2015 8/25/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Vince Gill (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

VINCE GILL
One of the most popular singers in modern country music, Vince Gill is famous for his top-notch songwriting, world-class guitar playing and warm, soaring tenor, all wrapped up in a quick and easy wit.

Vincent Grant Gill was born April 12, 1957 in Norman, Okla. His father encouraged him to learn to play guitar and banjo, which he did along with bass, mandolin, dobro and fiddle. While in high school, he performed in the bluegrass band Mountain Smoke, which built a strong local following and opened a concert for Pure Prairie League.

After graduating high school in 1975, Gill moved to Louisville, Ky. to be part of the band Bluegrass Alliance. After a brief time in Ricky Skaggs's Boone Creek band, Gill moved to Los Angeles and joined Sundance, a bluegrass group fronted by fiddler Byron Berline. In 1979, he joined Pure Prairie League as lead singer and recorded three albums with the band, the first of which yielded the Top Ten pop hit "Let Me Love You Tonight" in 1980. Departing the group in 1981, Gill joined Rodney Crowell's backing band the Cherry Bombs, where he met and worked with Tony Brown and Emory Gordy Jr., both of whom would later produce many of his future solo albums.

In 1983, Gill signed with RCA Records and moved with his wife Janis and daughter Jenny to Nashville to pursue his dream of being a Country Music artist. His debut mini-album Turn Me Loose (produced by Gordy) was released the following year, featuring his first charting solo single, "Victim of Life's Circumstance." The Things That Matter, his first full album was released later that year, featuring two Top 10 hits: a duet with Rosanne Cash on "If It Weren't For Him" and a solo hit with "Oklahoma Borderline." In 1987 he achieved his first Top 5 single, "Cinderella," from his album The Way Back Home. In addition to performing as a solo artist, Gill also worked frequently as a studio musician, wrote songs for other artists and toured with Emmylou Harris.

Gill signed with MCA Records in 1989, reuniting with Brown as a producer, and released the album When I Call Your Name. While the debut single "Oklahoma Swing" (a duet with Reba McEntire) reached the Top 20, it was the title cut that firmly established the singer as a new force on the Country Music scene. The song peaked at No. 2 and earned Gill his first CMA Award (Single of the Year) and his first Grammy Award (Best Male Country Vocal Performance) in 1990. The next single, "Never Knew Lonely," peaked at No. 3 and the album was certified Platinum by the RIAA for sales of more than one million copies.

Declining an offer from Mark Knopfler to join Dire Straits as a full-time member, Gill went on to record his next album Pocket Full of Gold, which also became a Platinum certified album after it was released in 1991. The album featured four Top 10 hits including the title cut, "Liza Jane," "Look at Us" and "Take Your Memory With You." That year he also earned his first CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award for his performance with Mark O'Connor and the New Nashville Cats (featuring Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Steve Wariner). In 1992 he released the quadruple-Platinum certified I Still Believe In You. The title cut became Gill's first No. 1 single, followed quickly by "Don't Let Our Love Start Slippin' Away." The album also featured the hits "One More Last Chance," "Tryin' to Get Over You" and "No Future in the Past." Gill also topped the charts with "The Heart Won't Lie," his second duet with McEntire, which was featured on her album It's Your Call.

Vince Gill co-hosted the CMA Awards for the first time in 1992. He continued to host "Country Music's Biggest Night" for 12 consecutive years, ending his run in 2003. Gill not only set a record for the most times anyone has consecutively hosted a televised award show, but he set the bar for other television awards emcees with his respect for his peers and the audience, quick ad libs and gentle humor.

Gill recorded his first Christmas album Let There Be Peace on Earth in 1993, before releasing When Love Finds You in 1994. This album also sold more than four million copies and featured six hits including the title cut, "What the Cowgirls Do," "Whenever You Come Around," "Which Bridge to Cross (Which Bridge to Burn)," "You Better Think Twice" and "Go Rest High On That Mountain." Becoming an in-demand duet partner, Gill sang with Amy Grant on "House of Love," the title cut of her 1994 album which became a hit on adult contemporary radio stations, and with Dolly Parton on a duet version of her signature "I Will Always Love You" from her Something Special album that earned the duo the CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award 1996.

His 1996 album High Lonesome Sound featured Gill's eclectic musical stylings. Hits included the title cut, "My Pretty Little Adrianna," "Worlds Apart," "You and You Alone" and "A Little More Love." The Key, released in 1998, was a return to hardcore Country while chronicling the turmoil in his life including the death of his father and the breakup of his first marriage. The album, which was one of his most critically acclaimed releases and his first to top the Billboard Country Albums Chart, featured the hits "If You Ever Have Forever In Mind" and his duet with Patty Loveless on "My Kind of Woman/My Kind of Man." His status as an in-demand duet partner continued with his 1999 duet "If You Ever Leave Me" with Barbra Streisand on the latter's album A Love Like Ours.

Gill married singer Amy Grant in 2000, and released Let's Make Sure We Kiss Goodbye that same year. The album celebrated his new relationship and featured the hit "Feels Like Love." The couple celebrated the birth of their daughter Corrina Grant Gill in 2001. Three years later, Gill released Next Big Thing, his first solo-produced album, featuring the title cut and "Young Man's Town." He reunited with Rodney Crowell, Tony Brown, Richard Bennett and Hank Devito (as well as new additions Eddie Bayers, John Hobbs and Michael Rhodes) as the Notorious Cherry Bombs, and the supergroup released an album in 2004 on Universal South Records featuring the single "It's Hard to Kiss the Lips at Night that Chew Your Ass Out All Day Long."

In 2006, Gill released These Days, a groundbreaking, four-CD set featuring 43 new recordings of diverse musical stylings. Each album in the set explored a different musical mood: traditional Country; ballads; contemporary, up-tempo; and acoustic/bluegrass music. The set features a variety of guest performers including John Anderson, Guy Clark, Sheryl Crow, Phil Everly, daughter Jenny Gill, wife Amy Grant, Emmylou Harris, Diana Krall, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt, Leann Rimes, Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Trisha Yearwood and more.

Gill has sold more than 26 million albums. He has earned 18 CMA Awards, including Entertainer of the Year in 1993 and 1994. He is tied with George Strait for having won the most CMA Male Vocalist Awards (five), and is currently second only to Brooks and Dunn for accumulating the most CMA Awards in history. Gill is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, and has received 20 Grammy Awards to date, the most of any male Country artist. An avid golfer, he helped create the annual Vince Gill Pro-Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament ("The Vinny") in 1993 in order to help support junior golf programs throughout Tennessee. Besides being known for his talent as a performer, musician and songwriter, Gill is regarded as one of Country Music's best known humanitarians, participating in hundreds of charitable events throughout his career.

In August of 2007, the Country Music Association inducted Gill as the newest members of the coveted Country Music Hall of Fame.

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Vince Gill (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

VINCE GILL
One of the most popular singers in modern country music, Vince Gill is famous for his top-notch songwriting, world-class guitar playing and warm, soaring tenor, all wrapped up in a quick and easy wit.

Vincent Grant Gill was born April 12, 1957 in Norman, Okla. His father encouraged him to learn to play guitar and banjo, which he did along with bass, mandolin, dobro and fiddle. While in high school, he performed in the bluegrass band Mountain Smoke, which built a strong local following and opened a concert for Pure Prairie League.

After graduating high school in 1975, Gill moved to Louisville, Ky. to be part of the band Bluegrass Alliance. After a brief time in Ricky Skaggs's Boone Creek band, Gill moved to Los Angeles and joined Sundance, a bluegrass group fronted by fiddler Byron Berline. In 1979, he joined Pure Prairie League as lead singer and recorded three albums with the band, the first of which yielded the Top Ten pop hit "Let Me Love You Tonight" in 1980. Departing the group in 1981, Gill joined Rodney Crowell's backing band the Cherry Bombs, where he met and worked with Tony Brown and Emory Gordy Jr., both of whom would later produce many of his future solo albums.

In 1983, Gill signed with RCA Records and moved with his wife Janis and daughter Jenny to Nashville to pursue his dream of being a Country Music artist. His debut mini-album Turn Me Loose (produced by Gordy) was released the following year, featuring his first charting solo single, "Victim of Life's Circumstance." The Things That Matter, his first full album was released later that year, featuring two Top 10 hits: a duet with Rosanne Cash on "If It Weren't For Him" and a solo hit with "Oklahoma Borderline." In 1987 he achieved his first Top 5 single, "Cinderella," from his album The Way Back Home. In addition to performing as a solo artist, Gill also worked frequently as a studio musician, wrote songs for other artists and toured with Emmylou Harris.

Gill signed with MCA Records in 1989, reuniting with Brown as a producer, and released the album When I Call Your Name. While the debut single "Oklahoma Swing" (a duet with Reba McEntire) reached the Top 20, it was the title cut that firmly established the singer as a new force on the Country Music scene. The song peaked at No. 2 and earned Gill his first CMA Award (Single of the Year) and his first Grammy Award (Best Male Country Vocal Performance) in 1990. The next single, "Never Knew Lonely," peaked at No. 3 and the album was certified Platinum by the RIAA for sales of more than one million copies.

Declining an offer from Mark Knopfler to join Dire Straits as a full-time member, Gill went on to record his next album Pocket Full of Gold, which also became a Platinum certified album after it was released in 1991. The album featured four Top 10 hits including the title cut, "Liza Jane," "Look at Us" and "Take Your Memory With You." That year he also earned his first CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award for his performance with Mark O'Connor and the New Nashville Cats (featuring Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Steve Wariner). In 1992 he released the quadruple-Platinum certified I Still Believe In You. The title cut became Gill's first No. 1 single, followed quickly by "Don't Let Our Love Start Slippin' Away." The album also featured the hits "One More Last Chance," "Tryin' to Get Over You" and "No Future in the Past." Gill also topped the charts with "The Heart Won't Lie," his second duet with McEntire, which was featured on her album It's Your Call.

Vince Gill co-hosted the CMA Awards for the first time in 1992. He continued to host "Country Music's Biggest Night" for 12 consecutive years, ending his run in 2003. Gill not only set a record for the most times anyone has consecutively hosted a televised award show, but he set the bar for other television awards emcees with his respect for his peers and the audience, quick ad libs and gentle humor.

Gill recorded his first Christmas album Let There Be Peace on Earth in 1993, before releasing When Love Finds You in 1994. This album also sold more than four million copies and featured six hits including the title cut, "What the Cowgirls Do," "Whenever You Come Around," "Which Bridge to Cross (Which Bridge to Burn)," "You Better Think Twice" and "Go Rest High On That Mountain." Becoming an in-demand duet partner, Gill sang with Amy Grant on "House of Love," the title cut of her 1994 album which became a hit on adult contemporary radio stations, and with Dolly Parton on a duet version of her signature "I Will Always Love You" from her Something Special album that earned the duo the CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award 1996.

His 1996 album High Lonesome Sound featured Gill's eclectic musical stylings. Hits included the title cut, "My Pretty Little Adrianna," "Worlds Apart," "You and You Alone" and "A Little More Love." The Key, released in 1998, was a return to hardcore Country while chronicling the turmoil in his life including the death of his father and the breakup of his first marriage. The album, which was one of his most critically acclaimed releases and his first to top the Billboard Country Albums Chart, featured the hits "If You Ever Have Forever In Mind" and his duet with Patty Loveless on "My Kind of Woman/My Kind of Man." His status as an in-demand duet partner continued with his 1999 duet "If You Ever Leave Me" with Barbra Streisand on the latter's album A Love Like Ours.

Gill married singer Amy Grant in 2000, and released Let's Make Sure We Kiss Goodbye that same year. The album celebrated his new relationship and featured the hit "Feels Like Love." The couple celebrated the birth of their daughter Corrina Grant Gill in 2001. Three years later, Gill released Next Big Thing, his first solo-produced album, featuring the title cut and "Young Man's Town." He reunited with Rodney Crowell, Tony Brown, Richard Bennett and Hank Devito (as well as new additions Eddie Bayers, John Hobbs and Michael Rhodes) as the Notorious Cherry Bombs, and the supergroup released an album in 2004 on Universal South Records featuring the single "It's Hard to Kiss the Lips at Night that Chew Your Ass Out All Day Long."

In 2006, Gill released These Days, a groundbreaking, four-CD set featuring 43 new recordings of diverse musical stylings. Each album in the set explored a different musical mood: traditional Country; ballads; contemporary, up-tempo; and acoustic/bluegrass music. The set features a variety of guest performers including John Anderson, Guy Clark, Sheryl Crow, Phil Everly, daughter Jenny Gill, wife Amy Grant, Emmylou Harris, Diana Krall, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt, Leann Rimes, Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Trisha Yearwood and more.

Gill has sold more than 26 million albums. He has earned 18 CMA Awards, including Entertainer of the Year in 1993 and 1994. He is tied with George Strait for having won the most CMA Male Vocalist Awards (five), and is currently second only to Brooks and Dunn for accumulating the most CMA Awards in history. Gill is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, and has received 20 Grammy Awards to date, the most of any male Country artist. An avid golfer, he helped create the annual Vince Gill Pro-Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament ("The Vinny") in 1993 in order to help support junior golf programs throughout Tennessee. Besides being known for his talent as a performer, musician and songwriter, Gill is regarded as one of Country Music's best known humanitarians, participating in hundreds of charitable events throughout his career.

In August of 2007, the Country Music Association inducted Gill as the newest members of the coveted Country Music Hall of Fame.

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Vince Gill (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

VINCE GILL
One of the most popular singers in modern country music, Vince Gill is famous for his top-notch songwriting, world-class guitar playing and warm, soaring tenor, all wrapped up in a quick and easy wit.

Vincent Grant Gill was born April 12, 1957 in Norman, Okla. His father encouraged him to learn to play guitar and banjo, which he did along with bass, mandolin, dobro and fiddle. While in high school, he performed in the bluegrass band Mountain Smoke, which built a strong local following and opened a concert for Pure Prairie League.

After graduating high school in 1975, Gill moved to Louisville, Ky. to be part of the band Bluegrass Alliance. After a brief time in Ricky Skaggs's Boone Creek band, Gill moved to Los Angeles and joined Sundance, a bluegrass group fronted by fiddler Byron Berline. In 1979, he joined Pure Prairie League as lead singer and recorded three albums with the band, the first of which yielded the Top Ten pop hit "Let Me Love You Tonight" in 1980. Departing the group in 1981, Gill joined Rodney Crowell's backing band the Cherry Bombs, where he met and worked with Tony Brown and Emory Gordy Jr., both of whom would later produce many of his future solo albums.

In 1983, Gill signed with RCA Records and moved with his wife Janis and daughter Jenny to Nashville to pursue his dream of being a Country Music artist. His debut mini-album Turn Me Loose (produced by Gordy) was released the following year, featuring his first charting solo single, "Victim of Life's Circumstance." The Things That Matter, his first full album was released later that year, featuring two Top 10 hits: a duet with Rosanne Cash on "If It Weren't For Him" and a solo hit with "Oklahoma Borderline." In 1987 he achieved his first Top 5 single, "Cinderella," from his album The Way Back Home. In addition to performing as a solo artist, Gill also worked frequently as a studio musician, wrote songs for other artists and toured with Emmylou Harris.

Gill signed with MCA Records in 1989, reuniting with Brown as a producer, and released the album When I Call Your Name. While the debut single "Oklahoma Swing" (a duet with Reba McEntire) reached the Top 20, it was the title cut that firmly established the singer as a new force on the Country Music scene. The song peaked at No. 2 and earned Gill his first CMA Award (Single of the Year) and his first Grammy Award (Best Male Country Vocal Performance) in 1990. The next single, "Never Knew Lonely," peaked at No. 3 and the album was certified Platinum by the RIAA for sales of more than one million copies.

Declining an offer from Mark Knopfler to join Dire Straits as a full-time member, Gill went on to record his next album Pocket Full of Gold, which also became a Platinum certified album after it was released in 1991. The album featured four Top 10 hits including the title cut, "Liza Jane," "Look at Us" and "Take Your Memory With You." That year he also earned his first CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award for his performance with Mark O'Connor and the New Nashville Cats (featuring Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Steve Wariner). In 1992 he released the quadruple-Platinum certified I Still Believe In You. The title cut became Gill's first No. 1 single, followed quickly by "Don't Let Our Love Start Slippin' Away." The album also featured the hits "One More Last Chance," "Tryin' to Get Over You" and "No Future in the Past." Gill also topped the charts with "The Heart Won't Lie," his second duet with McEntire, which was featured on her album It's Your Call.

Vince Gill co-hosted the CMA Awards for the first time in 1992. He continued to host "Country Music's Biggest Night" for 12 consecutive years, ending his run in 2003. Gill not only set a record for the most times anyone has consecutively hosted a televised award show, but he set the bar for other television awards emcees with his respect for his peers and the audience, quick ad libs and gentle humor.

Gill recorded his first Christmas album Let There Be Peace on Earth in 1993, before releasing When Love Finds You in 1994. This album also sold more than four million copies and featured six hits including the title cut, "What the Cowgirls Do," "Whenever You Come Around," "Which Bridge to Cross (Which Bridge to Burn)," "You Better Think Twice" and "Go Rest High On That Mountain." Becoming an in-demand duet partner, Gill sang with Amy Grant on "House of Love," the title cut of her 1994 album which became a hit on adult contemporary radio stations, and with Dolly Parton on a duet version of her signature "I Will Always Love You" from her Something Special album that earned the duo the CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award 1996.

His 1996 album High Lonesome Sound featured Gill's eclectic musical stylings. Hits included the title cut, "My Pretty Little Adrianna," "Worlds Apart," "You and You Alone" and "A Little More Love." The Key, released in 1998, was a return to hardcore Country while chronicling the turmoil in his life including the death of his father and the breakup of his first marriage. The album, which was one of his most critically acclaimed releases and his first to top the Billboard Country Albums Chart, featured the hits "If You Ever Have Forever In Mind" and his duet with Patty Loveless on "My Kind of Woman/My Kind of Man." His status as an in-demand duet partner continued with his 1999 duet "If You Ever Leave Me" with Barbra Streisand on the latter's album A Love Like Ours.

Gill married singer Amy Grant in 2000, and released Let's Make Sure We Kiss Goodbye that same year. The album celebrated his new relationship and featured the hit "Feels Like Love." The couple celebrated the birth of their daughter Corrina Grant Gill in 2001. Three years later, Gill released Next Big Thing, his first solo-produced album, featuring the title cut and "Young Man's Town." He reunited with Rodney Crowell, Tony Brown, Richard Bennett and Hank Devito (as well as new additions Eddie Bayers, John Hobbs and Michael Rhodes) as the Notorious Cherry Bombs, and the supergroup released an album in 2004 on Universal South Records featuring the single "It's Hard to Kiss the Lips at Night that Chew Your Ass Out All Day Long."

In 2006, Gill released These Days, a groundbreaking, four-CD set featuring 43 new recordings of diverse musical stylings. Each album in the set explored a different musical mood: traditional Country; ballads; contemporary, up-tempo; and acoustic/bluegrass music. The set features a variety of guest performers including John Anderson, Guy Clark, Sheryl Crow, Phil Everly, daughter Jenny Gill, wife Amy Grant, Emmylou Harris, Diana Krall, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt, Leann Rimes, Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Trisha Yearwood and more.

Gill has sold more than 26 million albums. He has earned 18 CMA Awards, including Entertainer of the Year in 1993 and 1994. He is tied with George Strait for having won the most CMA Male Vocalist Awards (five), and is currently second only to Brooks and Dunn for accumulating the most CMA Awards in history. Gill is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, and has received 20 Grammy Awards to date, the most of any male Country artist. An avid golfer, he helped create the annual Vince Gill Pro-Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament ("The Vinny") in 1993 in order to help support junior golf programs throughout Tennessee. Besides being known for his talent as a performer, musician and songwriter, Gill is regarded as one of Country Music's best known humanitarians, participating in hundreds of charitable events throughout his career.

In August of 2007, the Country Music Association inducted Gill as the newest members of the coveted Country Music Hall of Fame.

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Vince Gill (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

VINCE GILL
One of the most popular singers in modern country music, Vince Gill is famous for his top-notch songwriting, world-class guitar playing and warm, soaring tenor, all wrapped up in a quick and easy wit.

Vincent Grant Gill was born April 12, 1957 in Norman, Okla. His father encouraged him to learn to play guitar and banjo, which he did along with bass, mandolin, dobro and fiddle. While in high school, he performed in the bluegrass band Mountain Smoke, which built a strong local following and opened a concert for Pure Prairie League.

After graduating high school in 1975, Gill moved to Louisville, Ky. to be part of the band Bluegrass Alliance. After a brief time in Ricky Skaggs's Boone Creek band, Gill moved to Los Angeles and joined Sundance, a bluegrass group fronted by fiddler Byron Berline. In 1979, he joined Pure Prairie League as lead singer and recorded three albums with the band, the first of which yielded the Top Ten pop hit "Let Me Love You Tonight" in 1980. Departing the group in 1981, Gill joined Rodney Crowell's backing band the Cherry Bombs, where he met and worked with Tony Brown and Emory Gordy Jr., both of whom would later produce many of his future solo albums.

In 1983, Gill signed with RCA Records and moved with his wife Janis and daughter Jenny to Nashville to pursue his dream of being a Country Music artist. His debut mini-album Turn Me Loose (produced by Gordy) was released the following year, featuring his first charting solo single, "Victim of Life's Circumstance." The Things That Matter, his first full album was released later that year, featuring two Top 10 hits: a duet with Rosanne Cash on "If It Weren't For Him" and a solo hit with "Oklahoma Borderline." In 1987 he achieved his first Top 5 single, "Cinderella," from his album The Way Back Home. In addition to performing as a solo artist, Gill also worked frequently as a studio musician, wrote songs for other artists and toured with Emmylou Harris.

Gill signed with MCA Records in 1989, reuniting with Brown as a producer, and released the album When I Call Your Name. While the debut single "Oklahoma Swing" (a duet with Reba McEntire) reached the Top 20, it was the title cut that firmly established the singer as a new force on the Country Music scene. The song peaked at No. 2 and earned Gill his first CMA Award (Single of the Year) and his first Grammy Award (Best Male Country Vocal Performance) in 1990. The next single, "Never Knew Lonely," peaked at No. 3 and the album was certified Platinum by the RIAA for sales of more than one million copies.

Declining an offer from Mark Knopfler to join Dire Straits as a full-time member, Gill went on to record his next album Pocket Full of Gold, which also became a Platinum certified album after it was released in 1991. The album featured four Top 10 hits including the title cut, "Liza Jane," "Look at Us" and "Take Your Memory With You." That year he also earned his first CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award for his performance with Mark O'Connor and the New Nashville Cats (featuring Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Steve Wariner). In 1992 he released the quadruple-Platinum certified I Still Believe In You. The title cut became Gill's first No. 1 single, followed quickly by "Don't Let Our Love Start Slippin' Away." The album also featured the hits "One More Last Chance," "Tryin' to Get Over You" and "No Future in the Past." Gill also topped the charts with "The Heart Won't Lie," his second duet with McEntire, which was featured on her album It's Your Call.

Vince Gill co-hosted the CMA Awards for the first time in 1992. He continued to host "Country Music's Biggest Night" for 12 consecutive years, ending his run in 2003. Gill not only set a record for the most times anyone has consecutively hosted a televised award show, but he set the bar for other television awards emcees with his respect for his peers and the audience, quick ad libs and gentle humor.

Gill recorded his first Christmas album Let There Be Peace on Earth in 1993, before releasing When Love Finds You in 1994. This album also sold more than four million copies and featured six hits including the title cut, "What the Cowgirls Do," "Whenever You Come Around," "Which Bridge to Cross (Which Bridge to Burn)," "You Better Think Twice" and "Go Rest High On That Mountain." Becoming an in-demand duet partner, Gill sang with Amy Grant on "House of Love," the title cut of her 1994 album which became a hit on adult contemporary radio stations, and with Dolly Parton on a duet version of her signature "I Will Always Love You" from her Something Special album that earned the duo the CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award 1996.

His 1996 album High Lonesome Sound featured Gill's eclectic musical stylings. Hits included the title cut, "My Pretty Little Adrianna," "Worlds Apart," "You and You Alone" and "A Little More Love." The Key, released in 1998, was a return to hardcore Country while chronicling the turmoil in his life including the death of his father and the breakup of his first marriage. The album, which was one of his most critically acclaimed releases and his first to top the Billboard Country Albums Chart, featured the hits "If You Ever Have Forever In Mind" and his duet with Patty Loveless on "My Kind of Woman/My Kind of Man." His status as an in-demand duet partner continued with his 1999 duet "If You Ever Leave Me" with Barbra Streisand on the latter's album A Love Like Ours.

Gill married singer Amy Grant in 2000, and released Let's Make Sure We Kiss Goodbye that same year. The album celebrated his new relationship and featured the hit "Feels Like Love." The couple celebrated the birth of their daughter Corrina Grant Gill in 2001. Three years later, Gill released Next Big Thing, his first solo-produced album, featuring the title cut and "Young Man's Town." He reunited with Rodney Crowell, Tony Brown, Richard Bennett and Hank Devito (as well as new additions Eddie Bayers, John Hobbs and Michael Rhodes) as the Notorious Cherry Bombs, and the supergroup released an album in 2004 on Universal South Records featuring the single "It's Hard to Kiss the Lips at Night that Chew Your Ass Out All Day Long."

In 2006, Gill released These Days, a groundbreaking, four-CD set featuring 43 new recordings of diverse musical stylings. Each album in the set explored a different musical mood: traditional Country; ballads; contemporary, up-tempo; and acoustic/bluegrass music. The set features a variety of guest performers including John Anderson, Guy Clark, Sheryl Crow, Phil Everly, daughter Jenny Gill, wife Amy Grant, Emmylou Harris, Diana Krall, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt, Leann Rimes, Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Trisha Yearwood and more.

Gill has sold more than 26 million albums. He has earned 18 CMA Awards, including Entertainer of the Year in 1993 and 1994. He is tied with George Strait for having won the most CMA Male Vocalist Awards (five), and is currently second only to Brooks and Dunn for accumulating the most CMA Awards in history. Gill is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, and has received 20 Grammy Awards to date, the most of any male Country artist. An avid golfer, he helped create the annual Vince Gill Pro-Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament ("The Vinny") in 1993 in order to help support junior golf programs throughout Tennessee. Besides being known for his talent as a performer, musician and songwriter, Gill is regarded as one of Country Music's best known humanitarians, participating in hundreds of charitable events throughout his career.

In August of 2007, the Country Music Association inducted Gill as the newest members of the coveted Country Music Hall of Fame.

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Vince Gill (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

VINCE GILL
One of the most popular singers in modern country music, Vince Gill is famous for his top-notch songwriting, world-class guitar playing and warm, soaring tenor, all wrapped up in a quick and easy wit.

Vincent Grant Gill was born April 12, 1957 in Norman, Okla. His father encouraged him to learn to play guitar and banjo, which he did along with bass, mandolin, dobro and fiddle. While in high school, he performed in the bluegrass band Mountain Smoke, which built a strong local following and opened a concert for Pure Prairie League.

After graduating high school in 1975, Gill moved to Louisville, Ky. to be part of the band Bluegrass Alliance. After a brief time in Ricky Skaggs's Boone Creek band, Gill moved to Los Angeles and joined Sundance, a bluegrass group fronted by fiddler Byron Berline. In 1979, he joined Pure Prairie League as lead singer and recorded three albums with the band, the first of which yielded the Top Ten pop hit "Let Me Love You Tonight" in 1980. Departing the group in 1981, Gill joined Rodney Crowell's backing band the Cherry Bombs, where he met and worked with Tony Brown and Emory Gordy Jr., both of whom would later produce many of his future solo albums.

In 1983, Gill signed with RCA Records and moved with his wife Janis and daughter Jenny to Nashville to pursue his dream of being a Country Music artist. His debut mini-album Turn Me Loose (produced by Gordy) was released the following year, featuring his first charting solo single, "Victim of Life's Circumstance." The Things That Matter, his first full album was released later that year, featuring two Top 10 hits: a duet with Rosanne Cash on "If It Weren't For Him" and a solo hit with "Oklahoma Borderline." In 1987 he achieved his first Top 5 single, "Cinderella," from his album The Way Back Home. In addition to performing as a solo artist, Gill also worked frequently as a studio musician, wrote songs for other artists and toured with Emmylou Harris.

Gill signed with MCA Records in 1989, reuniting with Brown as a producer, and released the album When I Call Your Name. While the debut single "Oklahoma Swing" (a duet with Reba McEntire) reached the Top 20, it was the title cut that firmly established the singer as a new force on the Country Music scene. The song peaked at No. 2 and earned Gill his first CMA Award (Single of the Year) and his first Grammy Award (Best Male Country Vocal Performance) in 1990. The next single, "Never Knew Lonely," peaked at No. 3 and the album was certified Platinum by the RIAA for sales of more than one million copies.

Declining an offer from Mark Knopfler to join Dire Straits as a full-time member, Gill went on to record his next album Pocket Full of Gold, which also became a Platinum certified album after it was released in 1991. The album featured four Top 10 hits including the title cut, "Liza Jane," "Look at Us" and "Take Your Memory With You." That year he also earned his first CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award for his performance with Mark O'Connor and the New Nashville Cats (featuring Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Steve Wariner). In 1992 he released the quadruple-Platinum certified I Still Believe In You. The title cut became Gill's first No. 1 single, followed quickly by "Don't Let Our Love Start Slippin' Away." The album also featured the hits "One More Last Chance," "Tryin' to Get Over You" and "No Future in the Past." Gill also topped the charts with "The Heart Won't Lie," his second duet with McEntire, which was featured on her album It's Your Call.

Vince Gill co-hosted the CMA Awards for the first time in 1992. He continued to host "Country Music's Biggest Night" for 12 consecutive years, ending his run in 2003. Gill not only set a record for the most times anyone has consecutively hosted a televised award show, but he set the bar for other television awards emcees with his respect for his peers and the audience, quick ad libs and gentle humor.

Gill recorded his first Christmas album Let There Be Peace on Earth in 1993, before releasing When Love Finds You in 1994. This album also sold more than four million copies and featured six hits including the title cut, "What the Cowgirls Do," "Whenever You Come Around," "Which Bridge to Cross (Which Bridge to Burn)," "You Better Think Twice" and "Go Rest High On That Mountain." Becoming an in-demand duet partner, Gill sang with Amy Grant on "House of Love," the title cut of her 1994 album which became a hit on adult contemporary radio stations, and with Dolly Parton on a duet version of her signature "I Will Always Love You" from her Something Special album that earned the duo the CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award 1996.

His 1996 album High Lonesome Sound featured Gill's eclectic musical stylings. Hits included the title cut, "My Pretty Little Adrianna," "Worlds Apart," "You and You Alone" and "A Little More Love." The Key, released in 1998, was a return to hardcore Country while chronicling the turmoil in his life including the death of his father and the breakup of his first marriage. The album, which was one of his most critically acclaimed releases and his first to top the Billboard Country Albums Chart, featured the hits "If You Ever Have Forever In Mind" and his duet with Patty Loveless on "My Kind of Woman/My Kind of Man." His status as an in-demand duet partner continued with his 1999 duet "If You Ever Leave Me" with Barbra Streisand on the latter's album A Love Like Ours.

Gill married singer Amy Grant in 2000, and released Let's Make Sure We Kiss Goodbye that same year. The album celebrated his new relationship and featured the hit "Feels Like Love." The couple celebrated the birth of their daughter Corrina Grant Gill in 2001. Three years later, Gill released Next Big Thing, his first solo-produced album, featuring the title cut and "Young Man's Town." He reunited with Rodney Crowell, Tony Brown, Richard Bennett and Hank Devito (as well as new additions Eddie Bayers, John Hobbs and Michael Rhodes) as the Notorious Cherry Bombs, and the supergroup released an album in 2004 on Universal South Records featuring the single "It's Hard to Kiss the Lips at Night that Chew Your Ass Out All Day Long."

In 2006, Gill released These Days, a groundbreaking, four-CD set featuring 43 new recordings of diverse musical stylings. Each album in the set explored a different musical mood: traditional Country; ballads; contemporary, up-tempo; and acoustic/bluegrass music. The set features a variety of guest performers including John Anderson, Guy Clark, Sheryl Crow, Phil Everly, daughter Jenny Gill, wife Amy Grant, Emmylou Harris, Diana Krall, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt, Leann Rimes, Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Trisha Yearwood and more.

Gill has sold more than 26 million albums. He has earned 18 CMA Awards, including Entertainer of the Year in 1993 and 1994. He is tied with George Strait for having won the most CMA Male Vocalist Awards (five), and is currently second only to Brooks and Dunn for accumulating the most CMA Awards in history. Gill is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, and has received 20 Grammy Awards to date, the most of any male Country artist. An avid golfer, he helped create the annual Vince Gill Pro-Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament ("The Vinny") in 1993 in order to help support junior golf programs throughout Tennessee. Besides being known for his talent as a performer, musician and songwriter, Gill is regarded as one of Country Music's best known humanitarians, participating in hundreds of charitable events throughout his career.

In August of 2007, the Country Music Association inducted Gill as the newest members of the coveted Country Music Hall of Fame.

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
Vince Gill (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

VINCE GILL
One of the most popular singers in modern country music, Vince Gill is famous for his top-notch songwriting, world-class guitar playing and warm, soaring tenor, all wrapped up in a quick and easy wit.

Vincent Grant Gill was born April 12, 1957 in Norman, Okla. His father encouraged him to learn to play guitar and banjo, which he did along with bass, mandolin, dobro and fiddle. While in high school, he performed in the bluegrass band Mountain Smoke, which built a strong local following and opened a concert for Pure Prairie League.

After graduating high school in 1975, Gill moved to Louisville, Ky. to be part of the band Bluegrass Alliance. After a brief time in Ricky Skaggs's Boone Creek band, Gill moved to Los Angeles and joined Sundance, a bluegrass group fronted by fiddler Byron Berline. In 1979, he joined Pure Prairie League as lead singer and recorded three albums with the band, the first of which yielded the Top Ten pop hit "Let Me Love You Tonight" in 1980. Departing the group in 1981, Gill joined Rodney Crowell's backing band the Cherry Bombs, where he met and worked with Tony Brown and Emory Gordy Jr., both of whom would later produce many of his future solo albums.

In 1983, Gill signed with RCA Records and moved with his wife Janis and daughter Jenny to Nashville to pursue his dream of being a Country Music artist. His debut mini-album Turn Me Loose (produced by Gordy) was released the following year, featuring his first charting solo single, "Victim of Life's Circumstance." The Things That Matter, his first full album was released later that year, featuring two Top 10 hits: a duet with Rosanne Cash on "If It Weren't For Him" and a solo hit with "Oklahoma Borderline." In 1987 he achieved his first Top 5 single, "Cinderella," from his album The Way Back Home. In addition to performing as a solo artist, Gill also worked frequently as a studio musician, wrote songs for other artists and toured with Emmylou Harris.

Gill signed with MCA Records in 1989, reuniting with Brown as a producer, and released the album When I Call Your Name. While the debut single "Oklahoma Swing" (a duet with Reba McEntire) reached the Top 20, it was the title cut that firmly established the singer as a new force on the Country Music scene. The song peaked at No. 2 and earned Gill his first CMA Award (Single of the Year) and his first Grammy Award (Best Male Country Vocal Performance) in 1990. The next single, "Never Knew Lonely," peaked at No. 3 and the album was certified Platinum by the RIAA for sales of more than one million copies.

Declining an offer from Mark Knopfler to join Dire Straits as a full-time member, Gill went on to record his next album Pocket Full of Gold, which also became a Platinum certified album after it was released in 1991. The album featured four Top 10 hits including the title cut, "Liza Jane," "Look at Us" and "Take Your Memory With You." That year he also earned his first CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award for his performance with Mark O'Connor and the New Nashville Cats (featuring Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Steve Wariner). In 1992 he released the quadruple-Platinum certified I Still Believe In You. The title cut became Gill's first No. 1 single, followed quickly by "Don't Let Our Love Start Slippin' Away." The album also featured the hits "One More Last Chance," "Tryin' to Get Over You" and "No Future in the Past." Gill also topped the charts with "The Heart Won't Lie," his second duet with McEntire, which was featured on her album It's Your Call.

Vince Gill co-hosted the CMA Awards for the first time in 1992. He continued to host "Country Music's Biggest Night" for 12 consecutive years, ending his run in 2003. Gill not only set a record for the most times anyone has consecutively hosted a televised award show, but he set the bar for other television awards emcees with his respect for his peers and the audience, quick ad libs and gentle humor.

Gill recorded his first Christmas album Let There Be Peace on Earth in 1993, before releasing When Love Finds You in 1994. This album also sold more than four million copies and featured six hits including the title cut, "What the Cowgirls Do," "Whenever You Come Around," "Which Bridge to Cross (Which Bridge to Burn)," "You Better Think Twice" and "Go Rest High On That Mountain." Becoming an in-demand duet partner, Gill sang with Amy Grant on "House of Love," the title cut of her 1994 album which became a hit on adult contemporary radio stations, and with Dolly Parton on a duet version of her signature "I Will Always Love You" from her Something Special album that earned the duo the CMA Vocal Event of the Year Award 1996.

His 1996 album High Lonesome Sound featured Gill's eclectic musical stylings. Hits included the title cut, "My Pretty Little Adrianna," "Worlds Apart," "You and You Alone" and "A Little More Love." The Key, released in 1998, was a return to hardcore Country while chronicling the turmoil in his life including the death of his father and the breakup of his first marriage. The album, which was one of his most critically acclaimed releases and his first to top the Billboard Country Albums Chart, featured the hits "If You Ever Have Forever In Mind" and his duet with Patty Loveless on "My Kind of Woman/My Kind of Man." His status as an in-demand duet partner continued with his 1999 duet "If You Ever Leave Me" with Barbra Streisand on the latter's album A Love Like Ours.

Gill married singer Amy Grant in 2000, and released Let's Make Sure We Kiss Goodbye that same year. The album celebrated his new relationship and featured the hit "Feels Like Love." The couple celebrated the birth of their daughter Corrina Grant Gill in 2001. Three years later, Gill released Next Big Thing, his first solo-produced album, featuring the title cut and "Young Man's Town." He reunited with Rodney Crowell, Tony Brown, Richard Bennett and Hank Devito (as well as new additions Eddie Bayers, John Hobbs and Michael Rhodes) as the Notorious Cherry Bombs, and the supergroup released an album in 2004 on Universal South Records featuring the single "It's Hard to Kiss the Lips at Night that Chew Your Ass Out All Day Long."

In 2006, Gill released These Days, a groundbreaking, four-CD set featuring 43 new recordings of diverse musical stylings. Each album in the set explored a different musical mood: traditional Country; ballads; contemporary, up-tempo; and acoustic/bluegrass music. The set features a variety of guest performers including John Anderson, Guy Clark, Sheryl Crow, Phil Everly, daughter Jenny Gill, wife Amy Grant, Emmylou Harris, Diana Krall, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt, Leann Rimes, Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Trisha Yearwood and more.

Gill has sold more than 26 million albums. He has earned 18 CMA Awards, including Entertainer of the Year in 1993 and 1994. He is tied with George Strait for having won the most CMA Male Vocalist Awards (five), and is currently second only to Brooks and Dunn for accumulating the most CMA Awards in history. Gill is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, and has received 20 Grammy Awards to date, the most of any male Country artist. An avid golfer, he helped create the annual Vince Gill Pro-Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament ("The Vinny") in 1993 in order to help support junior golf programs throughout Tennessee. Besides being known for his talent as a performer, musician and songwriter, Gill is regarded as one of Country Music's best known humanitarians, participating in hundreds of charitable events throughout his career.

In August of 2007, the Country Music Association inducted Gill as the newest members of the coveted Country Music Hall of Fame.

8/19/2015 8/19/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYHC w/HS Singers (1pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 12:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO "Les Preludes" (7:30pm, Bowl) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: The Bowl

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:15 p.m.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA and "LES PRELUDES"
The season concludes with Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for a Common Man" and "Appalachian Spring," followed by the Interlochen Summer Arts Camp traditional final performance of Franz Liszt's "Les Preludes" - complete with the enormous forces of Interlochen's high school orchestra, band and dance ensembles.

Jung-Ho Pak, Conductor
Jeffrey S. Kimpton, Conductor

 


8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO "Les Preludes" (7:30pm, Bowl) - CART DRIVER

Location: The Bowl

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:15 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA and "LES PRELUDES"
The season concludes with Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for a Common Man" and "Appalachian Spring," followed by the Interlochen Summer Arts Camp traditional final performance of Franz Liszt's "Les Preludes" - complete with the enormous forces of Interlochen's high school orchestra, band and dance ensembles.

Jung-Ho Pak, Conductor
Jeffrey S. Kimpton, Conductor

 

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO "Les Preludes" (7:30pm, Bowl) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: The Bowl

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA and "LES PRELUDES"
The season concludes with Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for a Common Man" and "Appalachian Spring," followed by the Interlochen Summer Arts Camp traditional final performance of Franz Liszt's "Les Preludes" - complete with the enormous forces of Interlochen's high school orchestra, band and dance ensembles.

Jung-Ho Pak, Conductor
Jeffrey S. Kimpton, Conductor

 

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO "Les Preludes" (7:30pm, Bowl) - PARKING

Location: The Bowl

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:15 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA and "LES PRELUDES"
The season concludes with Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for a Common Man" and "Appalachian Spring," followed by the Interlochen Summer Arts Camp traditional final performance of Franz Liszt's "Les Preludes" - complete with the enormous forces of Interlochen's high school orchestra, band and dance ensembles.

Jung-Ho Pak, Conductor
Jeffrey S. Kimpton, Conductor

 

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO "Les Preludes" (7:30pm, Bowl) - USHER

Location: The Bowl

Please arrive at The Bowl no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA and "LES PRELUDES"
The season concludes with Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for a Common Man" and "Appalachian Spring," followed by the Interlochen Summer Arts Camp traditional final performance of Franz Liszt's "Les Preludes" - complete with the enormous forces of Interlochen's high school orchestra, band and dance ensembles.

Jung-Ho Pak, Conductor
Jeffrey S. Kimpton, Conductor

 

8/9/2015 8/9/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Cristian Macelaru & Christine Brewer (8pm, Kresge) - BOX OFFICE

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Box Office no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CRISTIAN MACELARU, CONDUCTOR and CHRISTINE BREWER, SOPRANO
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Cristian Macelaru to perform Barber's "Knoxville Summer of 1915." Other repertoire will include selections from Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet."

Christine Brewer
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer's appearances in opera, concert, and recital are marked by her own unique timbre, at once warm and brilliant, combined with a vibrant personality and emotional honesty reminiscent of the great sopranos of the past. Named one of the top 20 sopranos of all time (BBC Music), her range, golden tone, boundless power, and control make her a favorite of the stage and a highly sought-after recording artist, one who is "in her prime and sounding glorious" (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times).

Highlights of Brewer's 2011-12 season include singing Wagner and Beethoven for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's season-opening concert, followed by Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder with the New World Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas, and finally Ring cycle excerpts with the San Francisco Symphony and Esa-Pekka Salonen. The soprano also revisits Beethoven in five accounts of the Missa solemnis with the Boston Symphony and James Levine, culminating in a March 2012 performance at New York's Carnegie Hall. The "superlative Strauss singer" (New York Times) undertakes the late-Romantic's Four Last Songs with the St. Louis Symphony and David Robertson, and performs his music alongside that of Marx, Thomson, Ives, and Smith for a Mother's Day recital with her regular pianist Craig Rutenberg at New York's Alice Tully Hall. She returns to the London Symphony Orchestra under Sir Colin Davis for concert performances of Weber's Der Freischütz and makes her Los Angeles Opera debut with her celebrated portrayal of Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring.

The soprano's numerous 2010-11 season highlights included performances of Beethoven's Missa solemnis with both the Atlanta Symphony under Donald Runnicles and the San Francisco Symphony with Tilson Thomas, as well as Janácek's Glagolitic Mass with the Toronto and Chicago Symphonies led by James Conlon. She reprised Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with the Royal Concertgebouw and Detroit Symphony under Mariss Jansons and Leonard Slatkin, respectively, and performed Mahler's Symphony No. 2 and Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard with David Robertson and the St. Louis Symphony. She debuted in the iconic title role of Puccini's Turandot in a concert performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel, and was the featured soloist for the New York City Opera's opening night gala.

An avid recitalist, Brewer has graced such prestigious venues as Carnegie's Zankel Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, Oberlin Conservatory, the Friends of Chamber Music, Washington, D.C.'s Vocal Arts Society, and many others. She has appeared in Lincoln Center's "Art of the Song" series at Alice Tully Hall, the Boston Celebrity Series, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Atlanta's Spivey Hall, California's Mondavi Center, and Amsterdam's Concertgebouw. Her unique voice has also been featured at the Gilmore, Ravinia, and Cleveland Art Song festivals.

On the opera stage, Brewer is highly regarded for her striking portrayal of the title role in Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos, which she has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, Opéra de Lyon, Théatre du Chatelet, Santa Fe Opera, English National Opera, and Opera Theater of St. Louis. Attracting glowing reviews with each role, she has performed Wagner's Tristan und Isolde at San Francisco Opera, Gluck's Alceste with Santa Fe Opera, the Dyer's Wife in Strauss's Die Frau ohne Schatten at Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Paris Opera, and Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring at Santa Fe Opera. She is also revered for her work on lesser-known operas, which has seen her take on the title roles in Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride with the Edinburgh Festival, the Rio de Janeiro Opera, and Madrid Opera and Strauss's Die ägyptische Helena with the Santa Fe Opera.

Brewer has worked with many of today's most notable conductors, including Pierre Boulez, James Conlon, Sir Colin Davis, Christoph von Dohnányi, Christoph Eschenbach, Valery Gergiev, Alan Gilbert, Lorin Maazel, Sir Charles Mackerras, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, Antonio Pappano, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Sir Simon Rattle, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Shaw, and Jaap van Zweden. Frequently sought after to sing the great symphonic works of Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Mahler, Beethoven, Strauss, Wagner, Janácek, and Britten, she has sung with the philharmonics of New York and Los Angeles, and the orchestras of Cleveland, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, San Francisco, Boston, and Dallas. In Europe, the soprano counts the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra and Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, Gewandhaus Leipzig, Orchestre de Paris, and Toulouse Orchestra as regular partners. In addition, she has made appearances with the Malaysia Philharmonic, New World Symphony, and Toronto Symphony. The versatile artist has also been invited to perform for such special engagements as the re-opening of Covent Garden with Plácido Domingo for TRH the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, a concert of Handel with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and a gala performance of Górecki's Third Symphony with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and long-time collaborator Runnicles.

Brewer's recordings include a contribution to Hyperion's prestigious Schubert series with pianist Graham Johnson; the Janácek Glagolitic Mass and Dvorák Te Deum with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (Telarc); Dvorák's Stabat Mater (Naxos); and two recital recordings entitled "Saint Louis Woman" and "Music for a While," produced and released by Opera Theatre of St. Louis. March 2011 saw the release of Echoes of Nightingales (Hyperion), presenting the soprano and pianist Roger Vignoles in a nostalgic selection of the encore songs once favored by Kirsten Flagstad, Eileen Farrell, Helen Traubel, and Eleanor Steber. As the UK's Guardian describes, "Brewer, in tremendous voice, carves out a niche as their successor, partly because the majestic quality of her delivery equals theirs, but more importantly because she, like they, has the ability to make this repertoire live and breathe." Other recent releases include a live recital disc from Wigmore Hall (Koch); Strauss's Four Last Songs with the "Liebestod" from Tristan und Isolde, Strauss's Opera Scenes, and Mozart's Requiem with Runnicles and the Atlanta Symphony (Telarc); Fidelio in German with Davis and the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO Live); Barber's Vanessa with the BBC Symphony (Chandos) and the Grammy Award-winning Bolcom Songs of Innocence and Experience (Naxos), both conducted by Slatkin; Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with Sir Simon Rattle conducting the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI); a disc of lieder for Hyperion's new Richard Strauss series with Vignoles; Fidelio in English and "Great Operatic Arias" with the London Philharmonic (Chandos); and Britten's War Requiem with the London Philharmonic and Masur (LPO Live).

Actively involved in passing on a love of opera to the younger generation, Brewer introduced "Opera-tunities" to the sixth grade students of Marissa Elementary School, where she herself once taught, in Marissa, IL; the St. Louis Post-Dispatch describes this new educational outreach program as "an excellent lesson in music-making."

Cristian Măcelaru
Winner of the 2014 Solti Conducting Award, Cristian Măcelaru has established himself as one of the fast-rising stars of the conducting world. With every concert he displays an exciting and highly regarded presence, thoughtful interpretations and energetic conviction on the podium. Cristian Măcelaru came to public attention in February 2012 when he conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a replacement for Pierre Boulez in performances met with critical acclaim. Since his Chicago debut, he has conducted that orchestra on subscription in three consecutive seasons including 14/15. The Chicago Sun-Times exclaimed: "Măcelaru is the real thing, displaying confidence without arrogance and offering expressiveness without excess demonstration."

Recently appointed Conductor-in-Residence of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Măcelaru made an unexpected subscription debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra in April 2013. Since then, he has conducted Philadelphia in two further subscription programs in 13/14 and will lead two programs on subscription in 14/15. The 2014/15 season sees Măcelaru make his Carnegie Hall debut on a program with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Replacing the orchestra's Chief Conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Măcelaru will have the honor of conducting the Danish National Symphony Orchestra in Denmark and on a German and U.S. tour in January and February 2015. The 11-concert project includes the Carnegie appearance which features Anne-Sophie Mutter as violin soloist.

This season Mr. Măcelaru also returns on subscription to Chicago and has subscription debuts with the Toronto, Baltimore, Houston, St. Louis, Seattle, Detroit, Milwaukee and Indianapolis symphony orchestras in North America; the U.K.'s Hallé Orchestra and Bournemouth Symphony; and the Hague's Residentie Orkest in the Netherlands.

Guest-conducting highlights of the 2013-14 season included a subscription debut with the National Symphony Orchestra and violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, a European debut stepping in at the last minute with the Gothenburg Symphony, and concerts in his home country to lead the National Radio Orchestra of Romania in Mozart's Requiem. In March 2014, he returned to Chicago where he led overwhelmingly successful subscription appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, his third season in a row as a replacement for Maestro Boulez. His 2014 summer season commenced with an opening concert for the Caramoor Festival with the Orchestra of St. Luke's and Joshua Bell as soloist. Other summer appearances included festivals in Vail, Mann Center, Chautauqua and Saratoga Springs.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Cristian Macelaru & Christine Brewer (8pm, Kresge) - CART COORDINATOR

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge; Shuttle Cart Drivers will arrive no later than 5:45 p.m.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CRISTIAN MACELARU, CONDUCTOR and CHRISTINE BREWER, SOPRANO
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Cristian Macelaru to perform Barber's "Knoxville Summer of 1915." Other repertoire will include selections from Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet."

Christine Brewer
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer's appearances in opera, concert, and recital are marked by her own unique timbre, at once warm and brilliant, combined with a vibrant personality and emotional honesty reminiscent of the great sopranos of the past. Named one of the top 20 sopranos of all time (BBC Music), her range, golden tone, boundless power, and control make her a favorite of the stage and a highly sought-after recording artist, one who is "in her prime and sounding glorious" (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times).

Highlights of Brewer's 2011-12 season include singing Wagner and Beethoven for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's season-opening concert, followed by Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder with the New World Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas, and finally Ring cycle excerpts with the San Francisco Symphony and Esa-Pekka Salonen. The soprano also revisits Beethoven in five accounts of the Missa solemnis with the Boston Symphony and James Levine, culminating in a March 2012 performance at New York's Carnegie Hall. The "superlative Strauss singer" (New York Times) undertakes the late-Romantic's Four Last Songs with the St. Louis Symphony and David Robertson, and performs his music alongside that of Marx, Thomson, Ives, and Smith for a Mother's Day recital with her regular pianist Craig Rutenberg at New York's Alice Tully Hall. She returns to the London Symphony Orchestra under Sir Colin Davis for concert performances of Weber's Der Freischütz and makes her Los Angeles Opera debut with her celebrated portrayal of Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring.

The soprano's numerous 2010-11 season highlights included performances of Beethoven's Missa solemnis with both the Atlanta Symphony under Donald Runnicles and the San Francisco Symphony with Tilson Thomas, as well as Janácek's Glagolitic Mass with the Toronto and Chicago Symphonies led by James Conlon. She reprised Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with the Royal Concertgebouw and Detroit Symphony under Mariss Jansons and Leonard Slatkin, respectively, and performed Mahler's Symphony No. 2 and Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard with David Robertson and the St. Louis Symphony. She debuted in the iconic title role of Puccini's Turandot in a concert performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel, and was the featured soloist for the New York City Opera's opening night gala.

An avid recitalist, Brewer has graced such prestigious venues as Carnegie's Zankel Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, Oberlin Conservatory, the Friends of Chamber Music, Washington, D.C.'s Vocal Arts Society, and many others. She has appeared in Lincoln Center's "Art of the Song" series at Alice Tully Hall, the Boston Celebrity Series, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Atlanta's Spivey Hall, California's Mondavi Center, and Amsterdam's Concertgebouw. Her unique voice has also been featured at the Gilmore, Ravinia, and Cleveland Art Song festivals.

On the opera stage, Brewer is highly regarded for her striking portrayal of the title role in Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos, which she has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, Opéra de Lyon, Théatre du Chatelet, Santa Fe Opera, English National Opera, and Opera Theater of St. Louis. Attracting glowing reviews with each role, she has performed Wagner's Tristan und Isolde at San Francisco Opera, Gluck's Alceste with Santa Fe Opera, the Dyer's Wife in Strauss's Die Frau ohne Schatten at Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Paris Opera, and Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring at Santa Fe Opera. She is also revered for her work on lesser-known operas, which has seen her take on the title roles in Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride with the Edinburgh Festival, the Rio de Janeiro Opera, and Madrid Opera and Strauss's Die ägyptische Helena with the Santa Fe Opera.

Brewer has worked with many of today's most notable conductors, including Pierre Boulez, James Conlon, Sir Colin Davis, Christoph von Dohnányi, Christoph Eschenbach, Valery Gergiev, Alan Gilbert, Lorin Maazel, Sir Charles Mackerras, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, Antonio Pappano, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Sir Simon Rattle, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Shaw, and Jaap van Zweden. Frequently sought after to sing the great symphonic works of Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Mahler, Beethoven, Strauss, Wagner, Janácek, and Britten, she has sung with the philharmonics of New York and Los Angeles, and the orchestras of Cleveland, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, San Francisco, Boston, and Dallas. In Europe, the soprano counts the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra and Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, Gewandhaus Leipzig, Orchestre de Paris, and Toulouse Orchestra as regular partners. In addition, she has made appearances with the Malaysia Philharmonic, New World Symphony, and Toronto Symphony. The versatile artist has also been invited to perform for such special engagements as the re-opening of Covent Garden with Plácido Domingo for TRH the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, a concert of Handel with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and a gala performance of Górecki's Third Symphony with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and long-time collaborator Runnicles.

Brewer's recordings include a contribution to Hyperion's prestigious Schubert series with pianist Graham Johnson; the Janácek Glagolitic Mass and Dvorák Te Deum with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (Telarc); Dvorák's Stabat Mater (Naxos); and two recital recordings entitled "Saint Louis Woman" and "Music for a While," produced and released by Opera Theatre of St. Louis. March 2011 saw the release of Echoes of Nightingales (Hyperion), presenting the soprano and pianist Roger Vignoles in a nostalgic selection of the encore songs once favored by Kirsten Flagstad, Eileen Farrell, Helen Traubel, and Eleanor Steber. As the UK's Guardian describes, "Brewer, in tremendous voice, carves out a niche as their successor, partly because the majestic quality of her delivery equals theirs, but more importantly because she, like they, has the ability to make this repertoire live and breathe." Other recent releases include a live recital disc from Wigmore Hall (Koch); Strauss's Four Last Songs with the "Liebestod" from Tristan und Isolde, Strauss's Opera Scenes, and Mozart's Requiem with Runnicles and the Atlanta Symphony (Telarc); Fidelio in German with Davis and the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO Live); Barber's Vanessa with the BBC Symphony (Chandos) and the Grammy Award-winning Bolcom Songs of Innocence and Experience (Naxos), both conducted by Slatkin; Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with Sir Simon Rattle conducting the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI); a disc of lieder for Hyperion's new Richard Strauss series with Vignoles; Fidelio in English and "Great Operatic Arias" with the London Philharmonic (Chandos); and Britten's War Requiem with the London Philharmonic and Masur (LPO Live).

Actively involved in passing on a love of opera to the younger generation, Brewer introduced "Opera-tunities" to the sixth grade students of Marissa Elementary School, where she herself once taught, in Marissa, IL; the St. Louis Post-Dispatch describes this new educational outreach program as "an excellent lesson in music-making."

Cristian Măcelaru
Winner of the 2014 Solti Conducting Award, Cristian Măcelaru has established himself as one of the fast-rising stars of the conducting world. With every concert he displays an exciting and highly regarded presence, thoughtful interpretations and energetic conviction on the podium. Cristian Măcelaru came to public attention in February 2012 when he conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a replacement for Pierre Boulez in performances met with critical acclaim. Since his Chicago debut, he has conducted that orchestra on subscription in three consecutive seasons including 14/15. The Chicago Sun-Times exclaimed: "Măcelaru is the real thing, displaying confidence without arrogance and offering expressiveness without excess demonstration."

Recently appointed Conductor-in-Residence of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Măcelaru made an unexpected subscription debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra in April 2013. Since then, he has conducted Philadelphia in two further subscription programs in 13/14 and will lead two programs on subscription in 14/15. The 2014/15 season sees Măcelaru make his Carnegie Hall debut on a program with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Replacing the orchestra's Chief Conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Măcelaru will have the honor of conducting the Danish National Symphony Orchestra in Denmark and on a German and U.S. tour in January and February 2015. The 11-concert project includes the Carnegie appearance which features Anne-Sophie Mutter as violin soloist.

This season Mr. Măcelaru also returns on subscription to Chicago and has subscription debuts with the Toronto, Baltimore, Houston, St. Louis, Seattle, Detroit, Milwaukee and Indianapolis symphony orchestras in North America; the U.K.'s Hallé Orchestra and Bournemouth Symphony; and the Hague's Residentie Orkest in the Netherlands.

Guest-conducting highlights of the 2013-14 season included a subscription debut with the National Symphony Orchestra and violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, a European debut stepping in at the last minute with the Gothenburg Symphony, and concerts in his home country to lead the National Radio Orchestra of Romania in Mozart's Requiem. In March 2014, he returned to Chicago where he led overwhelmingly successful subscription appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, his third season in a row as a replacement for Maestro Boulez. His 2014 summer season commenced with an opening concert for the Caramoor Festival with the Orchestra of St. Luke's and Joshua Bell as soloist. Other summer appearances included festivals in Vail, Mann Center, Chautauqua and Saratoga Springs.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Cristian Macelaru & Christine Brewer (8pm, Kresge) - CART DRIVER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at the Storage Barn on Sawmill Road no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CRISTIAN MACELARU, CONDUCTOR and CHRISTINE BREWER, SOPRANO
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Cristian Macelaru to perform Barber's "Knoxville Summer of 1915." Other repertoire will include selections from Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet."

Christine Brewer
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer's appearances in opera, concert, and recital are marked by her own unique timbre, at once warm and brilliant, combined with a vibrant personality and emotional honesty reminiscent of the great sopranos of the past. Named one of the top 20 sopranos of all time (BBC Music), her range, golden tone, boundless power, and control make her a favorite of the stage and a highly sought-after recording artist, one who is "in her prime and sounding glorious" (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times).

Highlights of Brewer's 2011-12 season include singing Wagner and Beethoven for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's season-opening concert, followed by Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder with the New World Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas, and finally Ring cycle excerpts with the San Francisco Symphony and Esa-Pekka Salonen. The soprano also revisits Beethoven in five accounts of the Missa solemnis with the Boston Symphony and James Levine, culminating in a March 2012 performance at New York's Carnegie Hall. The "superlative Strauss singer" (New York Times) undertakes the late-Romantic's Four Last Songs with the St. Louis Symphony and David Robertson, and performs his music alongside that of Marx, Thomson, Ives, and Smith for a Mother's Day recital with her regular pianist Craig Rutenberg at New York's Alice Tully Hall. She returns to the London Symphony Orchestra under Sir Colin Davis for concert performances of Weber's Der Freischütz and makes her Los Angeles Opera debut with her celebrated portrayal of Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring.

The soprano's numerous 2010-11 season highlights included performances of Beethoven's Missa solemnis with both the Atlanta Symphony under Donald Runnicles and the San Francisco Symphony with Tilson Thomas, as well as Janácek's Glagolitic Mass with the Toronto and Chicago Symphonies led by James Conlon. She reprised Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with the Royal Concertgebouw and Detroit Symphony under Mariss Jansons and Leonard Slatkin, respectively, and performed Mahler's Symphony No. 2 and Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard with David Robertson and the St. Louis Symphony. She debuted in the iconic title role of Puccini's Turandot in a concert performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel, and was the featured soloist for the New York City Opera's opening night gala.

An avid recitalist, Brewer has graced such prestigious venues as Carnegie's Zankel Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, Oberlin Conservatory, the Friends of Chamber Music, Washington, D.C.'s Vocal Arts Society, and many others. She has appeared in Lincoln Center's "Art of the Song" series at Alice Tully Hall, the Boston Celebrity Series, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Atlanta's Spivey Hall, California's Mondavi Center, and Amsterdam's Concertgebouw. Her unique voice has also been featured at the Gilmore, Ravinia, and Cleveland Art Song festivals.

On the opera stage, Brewer is highly regarded for her striking portrayal of the title role in Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos, which she has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, Opéra de Lyon, Théatre du Chatelet, Santa Fe Opera, English National Opera, and Opera Theater of St. Louis. Attracting glowing reviews with each role, she has performed Wagner's Tristan und Isolde at San Francisco Opera, Gluck's Alceste with Santa Fe Opera, the Dyer's Wife in Strauss's Die Frau ohne Schatten at Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Paris Opera, and Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring at Santa Fe Opera. She is also revered for her work on lesser-known operas, which has seen her take on the title roles in Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride with the Edinburgh Festival, the Rio de Janeiro Opera, and Madrid Opera and Strauss's Die ägyptische Helena with the Santa Fe Opera.

Brewer has worked with many of today's most notable conductors, including Pierre Boulez, James Conlon, Sir Colin Davis, Christoph von Dohnányi, Christoph Eschenbach, Valery Gergiev, Alan Gilbert, Lorin Maazel, Sir Charles Mackerras, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, Antonio Pappano, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Sir Simon Rattle, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Shaw, and Jaap van Zweden. Frequently sought after to sing the great symphonic works of Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Mahler, Beethoven, Strauss, Wagner, Janácek, and Britten, she has sung with the philharmonics of New York and Los Angeles, and the orchestras of Cleveland, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, San Francisco, Boston, and Dallas. In Europe, the soprano counts the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra and Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, Gewandhaus Leipzig, Orchestre de Paris, and Toulouse Orchestra as regular partners. In addition, she has made appearances with the Malaysia Philharmonic, New World Symphony, and Toronto Symphony. The versatile artist has also been invited to perform for such special engagements as the re-opening of Covent Garden with Plácido Domingo for TRH the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, a concert of Handel with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and a gala performance of Górecki's Third Symphony with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and long-time collaborator Runnicles.

Brewer's recordings include a contribution to Hyperion's prestigious Schubert series with pianist Graham Johnson; the Janácek Glagolitic Mass and Dvorák Te Deum with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (Telarc); Dvorák's Stabat Mater (Naxos); and two recital recordings entitled "Saint Louis Woman" and "Music for a While," produced and released by Opera Theatre of St. Louis. March 2011 saw the release of Echoes of Nightingales (Hyperion), presenting the soprano and pianist Roger Vignoles in a nostalgic selection of the encore songs once favored by Kirsten Flagstad, Eileen Farrell, Helen Traubel, and Eleanor Steber. As the UK's Guardian describes, "Brewer, in tremendous voice, carves out a niche as their successor, partly because the majestic quality of her delivery equals theirs, but more importantly because she, like they, has the ability to make this repertoire live and breathe." Other recent releases include a live recital disc from Wigmore Hall (Koch); Strauss's Four Last Songs with the "Liebestod" from Tristan und Isolde, Strauss's Opera Scenes, and Mozart's Requiem with Runnicles and the Atlanta Symphony (Telarc); Fidelio in German with Davis and the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO Live); Barber's Vanessa with the BBC Symphony (Chandos) and the Grammy Award-winning Bolcom Songs of Innocence and Experience (Naxos), both conducted by Slatkin; Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with Sir Simon Rattle conducting the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI); a disc of lieder for Hyperion's new Richard Strauss series with Vignoles; Fidelio in English and "Great Operatic Arias" with the London Philharmonic (Chandos); and Britten's War Requiem with the London Philharmonic and Masur (LPO Live).

Actively involved in passing on a love of opera to the younger generation, Brewer introduced "Opera-tunities" to the sixth grade students of Marissa Elementary School, where she herself once taught, in Marissa, IL; the St. Louis Post-Dispatch describes this new educational outreach program as "an excellent lesson in music-making."

Cristian Măcelaru
Winner of the 2014 Solti Conducting Award, Cristian Măcelaru has established himself as one of the fast-rising stars of the conducting world. With every concert he displays an exciting and highly regarded presence, thoughtful interpretations and energetic conviction on the podium. Cristian Măcelaru came to public attention in February 2012 when he conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a replacement for Pierre Boulez in performances met with critical acclaim. Since his Chicago debut, he has conducted that orchestra on subscription in three consecutive seasons including 14/15. The Chicago Sun-Times exclaimed: "Măcelaru is the real thing, displaying confidence without arrogance and offering expressiveness without excess demonstration."

Recently appointed Conductor-in-Residence of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Măcelaru made an unexpected subscription debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra in April 2013. Since then, he has conducted Philadelphia in two further subscription programs in 13/14 and will lead two programs on subscription in 14/15. The 2014/15 season sees Măcelaru make his Carnegie Hall debut on a program with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Replacing the orchestra's Chief Conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Măcelaru will have the honor of conducting the Danish National Symphony Orchestra in Denmark and on a German and U.S. tour in January and February 2015. The 11-concert project includes the Carnegie appearance which features Anne-Sophie Mutter as violin soloist.

This season Mr. Măcelaru also returns on subscription to Chicago and has subscription debuts with the Toronto, Baltimore, Houston, St. Louis, Seattle, Detroit, Milwaukee and Indianapolis symphony orchestras in North America; the U.K.'s Hallé Orchestra and Bournemouth Symphony; and the Hague's Residentie Orkest in the Netherlands.

Guest-conducting highlights of the 2013-14 season included a subscription debut with the National Symphony Orchestra and violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, a European debut stepping in at the last minute with the Gothenburg Symphony, and concerts in his home country to lead the National Radio Orchestra of Romania in Mozart's Requiem. In March 2014, he returned to Chicago where he led overwhelmingly successful subscription appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, his third season in a row as a replacement for Maestro Boulez. His 2014 summer season commenced with an opening concert for the Caramoor Festival with the Orchestra of St. Luke's and Joshua Bell as soloist. Other summer appearances included festivals in Vail, Mann Center, Chautauqua and Saratoga Springs.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Cristian Macelaru & Christine Brewer (8pm, Kresge) - CROSSING GUARD

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please meet the Shuttle Cart Coordinators at Kresge no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CRISTIAN MACELARU, CONDUCTOR and CHRISTINE BREWER, SOPRANO
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Cristian Macelaru to perform Barber's "Knoxville Summer of 1915." Other repertoire will include selections from Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet."

Christine Brewer
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer's appearances in opera, concert, and recital are marked by her own unique timbre, at once warm and brilliant, combined with a vibrant personality and emotional honesty reminiscent of the great sopranos of the past. Named one of the top 20 sopranos of all time (BBC Music), her range, golden tone, boundless power, and control make her a favorite of the stage and a highly sought-after recording artist, one who is "in her prime and sounding glorious" (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times).

Highlights of Brewer's 2011-12 season include singing Wagner and Beethoven for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's season-opening concert, followed by Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder with the New World Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas, and finally Ring cycle excerpts with the San Francisco Symphony and Esa-Pekka Salonen. The soprano also revisits Beethoven in five accounts of the Missa solemnis with the Boston Symphony and James Levine, culminating in a March 2012 performance at New York's Carnegie Hall. The "superlative Strauss singer" (New York Times) undertakes the late-Romantic's Four Last Songs with the St. Louis Symphony and David Robertson, and performs his music alongside that of Marx, Thomson, Ives, and Smith for a Mother's Day recital with her regular pianist Craig Rutenberg at New York's Alice Tully Hall. She returns to the London Symphony Orchestra under Sir Colin Davis for concert performances of Weber's Der Freischütz and makes her Los Angeles Opera debut with her celebrated portrayal of Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring.

The soprano's numerous 2010-11 season highlights included performances of Beethoven's Missa solemnis with both the Atlanta Symphony under Donald Runnicles and the San Francisco Symphony with Tilson Thomas, as well as Janácek's Glagolitic Mass with the Toronto and Chicago Symphonies led by James Conlon. She reprised Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with the Royal Concertgebouw and Detroit Symphony under Mariss Jansons and Leonard Slatkin, respectively, and performed Mahler's Symphony No. 2 and Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard with David Robertson and the St. Louis Symphony. She debuted in the iconic title role of Puccini's Turandot in a concert performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel, and was the featured soloist for the New York City Opera's opening night gala.

An avid recitalist, Brewer has graced such prestigious venues as Carnegie's Zankel Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, Oberlin Conservatory, the Friends of Chamber Music, Washington, D.C.'s Vocal Arts Society, and many others. She has appeared in Lincoln Center's "Art of the Song" series at Alice Tully Hall, the Boston Celebrity Series, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Atlanta's Spivey Hall, California's Mondavi Center, and Amsterdam's Concertgebouw. Her unique voice has also been featured at the Gilmore, Ravinia, and Cleveland Art Song festivals.

On the opera stage, Brewer is highly regarded for her striking portrayal of the title role in Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos, which she has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, Opéra de Lyon, Théatre du Chatelet, Santa Fe Opera, English National Opera, and Opera Theater of St. Louis. Attracting glowing reviews with each role, she has performed Wagner's Tristan und Isolde at San Francisco Opera, Gluck's Alceste with Santa Fe Opera, the Dyer's Wife in Strauss's Die Frau ohne Schatten at Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Paris Opera, and Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring at Santa Fe Opera. She is also revered for her work on lesser-known operas, which has seen her take on the title roles in Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride with the Edinburgh Festival, the Rio de Janeiro Opera, and Madrid Opera and Strauss's Die ägyptische Helena with the Santa Fe Opera.

Brewer has worked with many of today's most notable conductors, including Pierre Boulez, James Conlon, Sir Colin Davis, Christoph von Dohnányi, Christoph Eschenbach, Valery Gergiev, Alan Gilbert, Lorin Maazel, Sir Charles Mackerras, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, Antonio Pappano, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Sir Simon Rattle, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Shaw, and Jaap van Zweden. Frequently sought after to sing the great symphonic works of Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Mahler, Beethoven, Strauss, Wagner, Janácek, and Britten, she has sung with the philharmonics of New York and Los Angeles, and the orchestras of Cleveland, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, San Francisco, Boston, and Dallas. In Europe, the soprano counts the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra and Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, Gewandhaus Leipzig, Orchestre de Paris, and Toulouse Orchestra as regular partners. In addition, she has made appearances with the Malaysia Philharmonic, New World Symphony, and Toronto Symphony. The versatile artist has also been invited to perform for such special engagements as the re-opening of Covent Garden with Plácido Domingo for TRH the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, a concert of Handel with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and a gala performance of Górecki's Third Symphony with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and long-time collaborator Runnicles.

Brewer's recordings include a contribution to Hyperion's prestigious Schubert series with pianist Graham Johnson; the Janácek Glagolitic Mass and Dvorák Te Deum with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (Telarc); Dvorák's Stabat Mater (Naxos); and two recital recordings entitled "Saint Louis Woman" and "Music for a While," produced and released by Opera Theatre of St. Louis. March 2011 saw the release of Echoes of Nightingales (Hyperion), presenting the soprano and pianist Roger Vignoles in a nostalgic selection of the encore songs once favored by Kirsten Flagstad, Eileen Farrell, Helen Traubel, and Eleanor Steber. As the UK's Guardian describes, "Brewer, in tremendous voice, carves out a niche as their successor, partly because the majestic quality of her delivery equals theirs, but more importantly because she, like they, has the ability to make this repertoire live and breathe." Other recent releases include a live recital disc from Wigmore Hall (Koch); Strauss's Four Last Songs with the "Liebestod" from Tristan und Isolde, Strauss's Opera Scenes, and Mozart's Requiem with Runnicles and the Atlanta Symphony (Telarc); Fidelio in German with Davis and the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO Live); Barber's Vanessa with the BBC Symphony (Chandos) and the Grammy Award-winning Bolcom Songs of Innocence and Experience (Naxos), both conducted by Slatkin; Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with Sir Simon Rattle conducting the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI); a disc of lieder for Hyperion's new Richard Strauss series with Vignoles; Fidelio in English and "Great Operatic Arias" with the London Philharmonic (Chandos); and Britten's War Requiem with the London Philharmonic and Masur (LPO Live).

Actively involved in passing on a love of opera to the younger generation, Brewer introduced "Opera-tunities" to the sixth grade students of Marissa Elementary School, where she herself once taught, in Marissa, IL; the St. Louis Post-Dispatch describes this new educational outreach program as "an excellent lesson in music-making."

Cristian Măcelaru
Winner of the 2014 Solti Conducting Award, Cristian Măcelaru has established himself as one of the fast-rising stars of the conducting world. With every concert he displays an exciting and highly regarded presence, thoughtful interpretations and energetic conviction on the podium. Cristian Măcelaru came to public attention in February 2012 when he conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a replacement for Pierre Boulez in performances met with critical acclaim. Since his Chicago debut, he has conducted that orchestra on subscription in three consecutive seasons including 14/15. The Chicago Sun-Times exclaimed: "Măcelaru is the real thing, displaying confidence without arrogance and offering expressiveness without excess demonstration."

Recently appointed Conductor-in-Residence of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Măcelaru made an unexpected subscription debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra in April 2013. Since then, he has conducted Philadelphia in two further subscription programs in 13/14 and will lead two programs on subscription in 14/15. The 2014/15 season sees Măcelaru make his Carnegie Hall debut on a program with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Replacing the orchestra's Chief Conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Măcelaru will have the honor of conducting the Danish National Symphony Orchestra in Denmark and on a German and U.S. tour in January and February 2015. The 11-concert project includes the Carnegie appearance which features Anne-Sophie Mutter as violin soloist.

This season Mr. Măcelaru also returns on subscription to Chicago and has subscription debuts with the Toronto, Baltimore, Houston, St. Louis, Seattle, Detroit, Milwaukee and Indianapolis symphony orchestras in North America; the U.K.'s Hallé Orchestra and Bournemouth Symphony; and the Hague's Residentie Orkest in the Netherlands.

Guest-conducting highlights of the 2013-14 season included a subscription debut with the National Symphony Orchestra and violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, a European debut stepping in at the last minute with the Gothenburg Symphony, and concerts in his home country to lead the National Radio Orchestra of Romania in Mozart's Requiem. In March 2014, he returned to Chicago where he led overwhelmingly successful subscription appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, his third season in a row as a replacement for Maestro Boulez. His 2014 summer season commenced with an opening concert for the Caramoor Festival with the Orchestra of St. Luke's and Joshua Bell as soloist. Other summer appearances included festivals in Vail, Mann Center, Chautauqua and Saratoga Springs.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Cristian Macelaru & Christine Brewer (8pm, Kresge) - PARKING

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Security no later than 5:45 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CRISTIAN MACELARU, CONDUCTOR and CHRISTINE BREWER, SOPRANO
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Cristian Macelaru to perform Barber's "Knoxville Summer of 1915." Other repertoire will include selections from Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet."

Christine Brewer
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer's appearances in opera, concert, and recital are marked by her own unique timbre, at once warm and brilliant, combined with a vibrant personality and emotional honesty reminiscent of the great sopranos of the past. Named one of the top 20 sopranos of all time (BBC Music), her range, golden tone, boundless power, and control make her a favorite of the stage and a highly sought-after recording artist, one who is "in her prime and sounding glorious" (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times).

Highlights of Brewer's 2011-12 season include singing Wagner and Beethoven for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's season-opening concert, followed by Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder with the New World Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas, and finally Ring cycle excerpts with the San Francisco Symphony and Esa-Pekka Salonen. The soprano also revisits Beethoven in five accounts of the Missa solemnis with the Boston Symphony and James Levine, culminating in a March 2012 performance at New York's Carnegie Hall. The "superlative Strauss singer" (New York Times) undertakes the late-Romantic's Four Last Songs with the St. Louis Symphony and David Robertson, and performs his music alongside that of Marx, Thomson, Ives, and Smith for a Mother's Day recital with her regular pianist Craig Rutenberg at New York's Alice Tully Hall. She returns to the London Symphony Orchestra under Sir Colin Davis for concert performances of Weber's Der Freischütz and makes her Los Angeles Opera debut with her celebrated portrayal of Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring.

The soprano's numerous 2010-11 season highlights included performances of Beethoven's Missa solemnis with both the Atlanta Symphony under Donald Runnicles and the San Francisco Symphony with Tilson Thomas, as well as Janácek's Glagolitic Mass with the Toronto and Chicago Symphonies led by James Conlon. She reprised Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with the Royal Concertgebouw and Detroit Symphony under Mariss Jansons and Leonard Slatkin, respectively, and performed Mahler's Symphony No. 2 and Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard with David Robertson and the St. Louis Symphony. She debuted in the iconic title role of Puccini's Turandot in a concert performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel, and was the featured soloist for the New York City Opera's opening night gala.

An avid recitalist, Brewer has graced such prestigious venues as Carnegie's Zankel Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, Oberlin Conservatory, the Friends of Chamber Music, Washington, D.C.'s Vocal Arts Society, and many others. She has appeared in Lincoln Center's "Art of the Song" series at Alice Tully Hall, the Boston Celebrity Series, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Atlanta's Spivey Hall, California's Mondavi Center, and Amsterdam's Concertgebouw. Her unique voice has also been featured at the Gilmore, Ravinia, and Cleveland Art Song festivals.

On the opera stage, Brewer is highly regarded for her striking portrayal of the title role in Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos, which she has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, Opéra de Lyon, Théatre du Chatelet, Santa Fe Opera, English National Opera, and Opera Theater of St. Louis. Attracting glowing reviews with each role, she has performed Wagner's Tristan und Isolde at San Francisco Opera, Gluck's Alceste with Santa Fe Opera, the Dyer's Wife in Strauss's Die Frau ohne Schatten at Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Paris Opera, and Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring at Santa Fe Opera. She is also revered for her work on lesser-known operas, which has seen her take on the title roles in Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride with the Edinburgh Festival, the Rio de Janeiro Opera, and Madrid Opera and Strauss's Die ägyptische Helena with the Santa Fe Opera.

Brewer has worked with many of today's most notable conductors, including Pierre Boulez, James Conlon, Sir Colin Davis, Christoph von Dohnányi, Christoph Eschenbach, Valery Gergiev, Alan Gilbert, Lorin Maazel, Sir Charles Mackerras, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, Antonio Pappano, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Sir Simon Rattle, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Shaw, and Jaap van Zweden. Frequently sought after to sing the great symphonic works of Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Mahler, Beethoven, Strauss, Wagner, Janácek, and Britten, she has sung with the philharmonics of New York and Los Angeles, and the orchestras of Cleveland, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, San Francisco, Boston, and Dallas. In Europe, the soprano counts the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra and Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, Gewandhaus Leipzig, Orchestre de Paris, and Toulouse Orchestra as regular partners. In addition, she has made appearances with the Malaysia Philharmonic, New World Symphony, and Toronto Symphony. The versatile artist has also been invited to perform for such special engagements as the re-opening of Covent Garden with Plácido Domingo for TRH the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, a concert of Handel with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and a gala performance of Górecki's Third Symphony with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and long-time collaborator Runnicles.

Brewer's recordings include a contribution to Hyperion's prestigious Schubert series with pianist Graham Johnson; the Janácek Glagolitic Mass and Dvorák Te Deum with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (Telarc); Dvorák's Stabat Mater (Naxos); and two recital recordings entitled "Saint Louis Woman" and "Music for a While," produced and released by Opera Theatre of St. Louis. March 2011 saw the release of Echoes of Nightingales (Hyperion), presenting the soprano and pianist Roger Vignoles in a nostalgic selection of the encore songs once favored by Kirsten Flagstad, Eileen Farrell, Helen Traubel, and Eleanor Steber. As the UK's Guardian describes, "Brewer, in tremendous voice, carves out a niche as their successor, partly because the majestic quality of her delivery equals theirs, but more importantly because she, like they, has the ability to make this repertoire live and breathe." Other recent releases include a live recital disc from Wigmore Hall (Koch); Strauss's Four Last Songs with the "Liebestod" from Tristan und Isolde, Strauss's Opera Scenes, and Mozart's Requiem with Runnicles and the Atlanta Symphony (Telarc); Fidelio in German with Davis and the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO Live); Barber's Vanessa with the BBC Symphony (Chandos) and the Grammy Award-winning Bolcom Songs of Innocence and Experience (Naxos), both conducted by Slatkin; Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with Sir Simon Rattle conducting the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI); a disc of lieder for Hyperion's new Richard Strauss series with Vignoles; Fidelio in English and "Great Operatic Arias" with the London Philharmonic (Chandos); and Britten's War Requiem with the London Philharmonic and Masur (LPO Live).

Actively involved in passing on a love of opera to the younger generation, Brewer introduced "Opera-tunities" to the sixth grade students of Marissa Elementary School, where she herself once taught, in Marissa, IL; the St. Louis Post-Dispatch describes this new educational outreach program as "an excellent lesson in music-making."

Cristian Măcelaru
Winner of the 2014 Solti Conducting Award, Cristian Măcelaru has established himself as one of the fast-rising stars of the conducting world. With every concert he displays an exciting and highly regarded presence, thoughtful interpretations and energetic conviction on the podium. Cristian Măcelaru came to public attention in February 2012 when he conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a replacement for Pierre Boulez in performances met with critical acclaim. Since his Chicago debut, he has conducted that orchestra on subscription in three consecutive seasons including 14/15. The Chicago Sun-Times exclaimed: "Măcelaru is the real thing, displaying confidence without arrogance and offering expressiveness without excess demonstration."

Recently appointed Conductor-in-Residence of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Măcelaru made an unexpected subscription debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra in April 2013. Since then, he has conducted Philadelphia in two further subscription programs in 13/14 and will lead two programs on subscription in 14/15. The 2014/15 season sees Măcelaru make his Carnegie Hall debut on a program with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Replacing the orchestra's Chief Conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Măcelaru will have the honor of conducting the Danish National Symphony Orchestra in Denmark and on a German and U.S. tour in January and February 2015. The 11-concert project includes the Carnegie appearance which features Anne-Sophie Mutter as violin soloist.

This season Mr. Măcelaru also returns on subscription to Chicago and has subscription debuts with the Toronto, Baltimore, Houston, St. Louis, Seattle, Detroit, Milwaukee and Indianapolis symphony orchestras in North America; the U.K.'s Hallé Orchestra and Bournemouth Symphony; and the Hague's Residentie Orkest in the Netherlands.

Guest-conducting highlights of the 2013-14 season included a subscription debut with the National Symphony Orchestra and violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, a European debut stepping in at the last minute with the Gothenburg Symphony, and concerts in his home country to lead the National Radio Orchestra of Romania in Mozart's Requiem. In March 2014, he returned to Chicago where he led overwhelmingly successful subscription appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, his third season in a row as a replacement for Maestro Boulez. His 2014 summer season commenced with an opening concert for the Caramoor Festival with the Orchestra of St. Luke's and Joshua Bell as soloist. Other summer appearances included festivals in Vail, Mann Center, Chautauqua and Saratoga Springs.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYSO w/Cristian Macelaru & Christine Brewer (8pm, Kresge) - USHER

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:30 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge. 

WORLD YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with CRISTIAN MACELARU, CONDUCTOR and CHRISTINE BREWER, SOPRANO
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer will join the World Youth Symphony Orchestra with guest conductor Cristian Macelaru to perform Barber's "Knoxville Summer of 1915." Other repertoire will include selections from Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet."

Christine Brewer
Grammy Award-winning American soprano Christine Brewer's appearances in opera, concert, and recital are marked by her own unique timbre, at once warm and brilliant, combined with a vibrant personality and emotional honesty reminiscent of the great sopranos of the past. Named one of the top 20 sopranos of all time (BBC Music), her range, golden tone, boundless power, and control make her a favorite of the stage and a highly sought-after recording artist, one who is "in her prime and sounding glorious" (Anthony Tommasini, New York Times).

Highlights of Brewer's 2011-12 season include singing Wagner and Beethoven for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's season-opening concert, followed by Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder with the New World Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas, and finally Ring cycle excerpts with the San Francisco Symphony and Esa-Pekka Salonen. The soprano also revisits Beethoven in five accounts of the Missa solemnis with the Boston Symphony and James Levine, culminating in a March 2012 performance at New York's Carnegie Hall. The "superlative Strauss singer" (New York Times) undertakes the late-Romantic's Four Last Songs with the St. Louis Symphony and David Robertson, and performs his music alongside that of Marx, Thomson, Ives, and Smith for a Mother's Day recital with her regular pianist Craig Rutenberg at New York's Alice Tully Hall. She returns to the London Symphony Orchestra under Sir Colin Davis for concert performances of Weber's Der Freischütz and makes her Los Angeles Opera debut with her celebrated portrayal of Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring.

The soprano's numerous 2010-11 season highlights included performances of Beethoven's Missa solemnis with both the Atlanta Symphony under Donald Runnicles and the San Francisco Symphony with Tilson Thomas, as well as Janácek's Glagolitic Mass with the Toronto and Chicago Symphonies led by James Conlon. She reprised Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with the Royal Concertgebouw and Detroit Symphony under Mariss Jansons and Leonard Slatkin, respectively, and performed Mahler's Symphony No. 2 and Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard with David Robertson and the St. Louis Symphony. She debuted in the iconic title role of Puccini's Turandot in a concert performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel, and was the featured soloist for the New York City Opera's opening night gala.

An avid recitalist, Brewer has graced such prestigious venues as Carnegie's Zankel Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, Oberlin Conservatory, the Friends of Chamber Music, Washington, D.C.'s Vocal Arts Society, and many others. She has appeared in Lincoln Center's "Art of the Song" series at Alice Tully Hall, the Boston Celebrity Series, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Atlanta's Spivey Hall, California's Mondavi Center, and Amsterdam's Concertgebouw. Her unique voice has also been featured at the Gilmore, Ravinia, and Cleveland Art Song festivals.

On the opera stage, Brewer is highly regarded for her striking portrayal of the title role in Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos, which she has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, Opéra de Lyon, Théatre du Chatelet, Santa Fe Opera, English National Opera, and Opera Theater of St. Louis. Attracting glowing reviews with each role, she has performed Wagner's Tristan und Isolde at San Francisco Opera, Gluck's Alceste with Santa Fe Opera, the Dyer's Wife in Strauss's Die Frau ohne Schatten at Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Paris Opera, and Lady Billows in Britten's Albert Herring at Santa Fe Opera. She is also revered for her work on lesser-known operas, which has seen her take on the title roles in Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride with the Edinburgh Festival, the Rio de Janeiro Opera, and Madrid Opera and Strauss's Die ägyptische Helena with the Santa Fe Opera.

Brewer has worked with many of today's most notable conductors, including Pierre Boulez, James Conlon, Sir Colin Davis, Christoph von Dohnányi, Christoph Eschenbach, Valery Gergiev, Alan Gilbert, Lorin Maazel, Sir Charles Mackerras, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, Antonio Pappano, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Sir Simon Rattle, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Shaw, and Jaap van Zweden. Frequently sought after to sing the great symphonic works of Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Mahler, Beethoven, Strauss, Wagner, Janácek, and Britten, she has sung with the philharmonics of New York and Los Angeles, and the orchestras of Cleveland, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, San Francisco, Boston, and Dallas. In Europe, the soprano counts the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra and Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, Gewandhaus Leipzig, Orchestre de Paris, and Toulouse Orchestra as regular partners. In addition, she has made appearances with the Malaysia Philharmonic, New World Symphony, and Toronto Symphony. The versatile artist has also been invited to perform for such special engagements as the re-opening of Covent Garden with Plácido Domingo for TRH the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, a concert of Handel with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and a gala performance of Górecki's Third Symphony with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and long-time collaborator Runnicles.

Brewer's recordings include a contribution to Hyperion's prestigious Schubert series with pianist Graham Johnson; the Janácek Glagolitic Mass and Dvorák Te Deum with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (Telarc); Dvorák's Stabat Mater (Naxos); and two recital recordings entitled "Saint Louis Woman" and "Music for a While," produced and released by Opera Theatre of St. Louis. March 2011 saw the release of Echoes of Nightingales (Hyperion), presenting the soprano and pianist Roger Vignoles in a nostalgic selection of the encore songs once favored by Kirsten Flagstad, Eileen Farrell, Helen Traubel, and Eleanor Steber. As the UK's Guardian describes, "Brewer, in tremendous voice, carves out a niche as their successor, partly because the majestic quality of her delivery equals theirs, but more importantly because she, like they, has the ability to make this repertoire live and breathe." Other recent releases include a live recital disc from Wigmore Hall (Koch); Strauss's Four Last Songs with the "Liebestod" from Tristan und Isolde, Strauss's Opera Scenes, and Mozart's Requiem with Runnicles and the Atlanta Symphony (Telarc); Fidelio in German with Davis and the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO Live); Barber's Vanessa with the BBC Symphony (Chandos) and the Grammy Award-winning Bolcom Songs of Innocence and Experience (Naxos), both conducted by Slatkin; Mahler's Symphony No. 8 with Sir Simon Rattle conducting the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI); a disc of lieder for Hyperion's new Richard Strauss series with Vignoles; Fidelio in English and "Great Operatic Arias" with the London Philharmonic (Chandos); and Britten's War Requiem with the London Philharmonic and Masur (LPO Live).

Actively involved in passing on a love of opera to the younger generation, Brewer introduced "Opera-tunities" to the sixth grade students of Marissa Elementary School, where she herself once taught, in Marissa, IL; the St. Louis Post-Dispatch describes this new educational outreach program as "an excellent lesson in music-making."

Cristian Măcelaru
Winner of the 2014 Solti Conducting Award, Cristian Măcelaru has established himself as one of the fast-rising stars of the conducting world. With every concert he displays an exciting and highly regarded presence, thoughtful interpretations and energetic conviction on the podium. Cristian Măcelaru came to public attention in February 2012 when he conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a replacement for Pierre Boulez in performances met with critical acclaim. Since his Chicago debut, he has conducted that orchestra on subscription in three consecutive seasons including 14/15. The Chicago Sun-Times exclaimed: "Măcelaru is the real thing, displaying confidence without arrogance and offering expressiveness without excess demonstration."

Recently appointed Conductor-in-Residence of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Măcelaru made an unexpected subscription debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra in April 2013. Since then, he has conducted Philadelphia in two further subscription programs in 13/14 and will lead two programs on subscription in 14/15. The 2014/15 season sees Măcelaru make his Carnegie Hall debut on a program with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Replacing the orchestra's Chief Conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Măcelaru will have the honor of conducting the Danish National Symphony Orchestra in Denmark and on a German and U.S. tour in January and February 2015. The 11-concert project includes the Carnegie appearance which features Anne-Sophie Mutter as violin soloist.

This season Mr. Măcelaru also returns on subscription to Chicago and has subscription debuts with the Toronto, Baltimore, Houston, St. Louis, Seattle, Detroit, Milwaukee and Indianapolis symphony orchestras in North America; the U.K.'s Hallé Orchestra and Bournemouth Symphony; and the Hague's Residentie Orkest in the Netherlands.

Guest-conducting highlights of the 2013-14 season included a subscription debut with the National Symphony Orchestra and violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, a European debut stepping in at the last minute with the Gothenburg Symphony, and concerts in his home country to lead the National Radio Orchestra of Romania in Mozart's Requiem. In March 2014, he returned to Chicago where he led overwhelmingly successful subscription appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, his third season in a row as a replacement for Maestro Boulez. His 2014 summer season commenced with an opening concert for the Caramoor Festival with the Orchestra of St. Luke's and Joshua Bell as soloist. Other summer appearances included festivals in Vail, Mann Center, Chautauqua and Saratoga Springs.

8/2/2015 8/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYWS - 8/1 (7pm, Corson)

Location: Corson Auditorium

Please arrive at Corson Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/1/2015 8/1/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
WYWS - 8/8 (7pm, Kresge)

Location: Kresge Auditorium

Please arrive at Kresge Auditorium no later than 6:00 p.m. in uniform and with your volunteer name badge.

8/8/2015 8/8/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  

Volunteer Interests

Activity Start Date End Date Status  
M-137 Litter Pick-Up 8/4/15

ICA Volunteers do a tremendous job at cleaning up the appx. 2-mile stretch of M-137 from Interlochen Elementary to Norpines. MDOT vests, gloves, bags, and sticks are provided. This activity generally takes 2 hours or less to complete.

8/4/2015 8/4/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  
M-137 Litter Pick-Up 9/2/15

ICA Volunteers do a tremendous job at cleaning up the appx. 2-mile stretch of M-137 from Interlochen Elementary to Norpines. MDOT vests, gloves, bags, and sticks are provided. This activity generally takes 2 hours or less to complete.

9/2/2015 9/2/2015 3Scheduled  0All shifts available  

Mission Statement

Interlochen Center for the Arts engages and inspires people worldwide through excellence in educational, artistic and cultural programs, enhancing the quality of life through the universal language of the arts.
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